MichS

Untreated stress - source of relapse?

6 posts in this topic

Hi! I've recently discovered the 'anticancer services' of Ukrainian psycho-oncologist Vladislav Matrenitsky M.D., Ph.D. He claims that cancer is psychosomatic illness which develops as a result of irresolvable psychic traumas, intrapersonal conflicts or other severe stresses turned into chronic state. This leads to emerging of a 'psychogenic oncodominant' in mind, discovered by scientists from the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences.
I quote:

"This dominant firmly holds the place of the purpose of life dominant, and forms deep deformations of the psychosomatic system.
Thus, the “mental neoplasm”, the oncological dominant, entails a somatic neoplasm – cancer.
The psychogenic oncodominant, according to Russian scientists, usually does not disappear during the traditional, somatically oriented treatment. When “familiar” psychotraumatic stimuli appear, which often happens when the patient returns to his/her old way of life, the oncodominant can be reactivated. This leads to a recurrence of tumor growth.

Consequently, successful treatment of oncological diseases is impossible without the psychotherapeutic elimination of the oncodominant."

Any ideas if it worth to try?

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Hi Mich,

Just my opinion, but this sounds like another version of blaming us for our illness. I  think that our state of mind can affect our quality of life in recovery, and that stress reduction, prayer (ours and others), positive thoughts, visualization, etc, can be helpful for some of us.  But I distrust someone who treats cancer as a psychosomatic illness that requires psychotherapy for "successful treatment".  And I note that this person appears to be selling a particular brand of psychotherapy. I'm not buying!

Bridget

Julie in SoCal and Judy M. like this

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Yes, this sounds like another version of blame the patient or maybe a more "sophisticated version" of sell healing to the vulnerable.

Maybe I'm more sensitive to this than others, but I hate it when people hear I have lung cancer and then ask if I smoked. Now I get the connection, but why would anyone ask.  We wouldn't ask a breast cancer patient if they nursed their babies! How is it socially ok to ask if I smoked? Because if I smoked then in the mind of the theoretical asker, I could be blamed for my lung cancer and if I sun bathed, I can be blamed for my melanoma. And since the asker theoretically didn't do these things, he or she will be ok. Yes this is dog wash.

So, with Respect to Mitch the above poster, what do you intend with your post? Are you selling us healing? Blaming us for our illness? What's your connection with cancer? Are you free of psychotraumaic stimuli?  Or are you posting a service?

And by the way, no, I didn't smoke or sun bathe!

Julie

 

Judy M. likes this

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Mich,

If "successful treatment of oncological diseases is impossible without the psychotherapeutic elimination of the oncodominant", and I didn't have psychotherapeutic elimination, how do you explain my successful treatment.

Impossible has a specific and clear meaning.  No scientist or physician, Russian or otherwise, would use the word impossible in that context.  Therefore, I conclude Vladislav Matrenitsky M.D., Ph.D is not credible.

Stay the course.

Tom

Julie in SoCal likes this

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Hi there

To me the topic sounds very much in line with ideas of Simontons, Siegel, Leshan etc. Actually, I was looking for somebody who develops their ideas and found this Dr. Just wanted to hear if somebody tried this kind of service.

Michael

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Julie
And I nursed 2 of my 4 children and still got breast cancer. This and no family history was why I really never worried about that. And I can affirm that breast cancer patients get a lot more public support than lung cancer patients having walked in both of those shoes. I don't believe stress causes relapse, but we do all feel better without it. But easier said than done in the situation.

Sent from my SM-J100VPP using Tapatalk

Julie in SoCal likes this

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