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Lets hear about the positive side of lung cancer

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I, too, looked at this post like "what could be the positive side of having cancer?" But then as I read all the other posts, I realized that there have been so many things I have realized in this past year that I would never have known if it were not for my cancer.

1. Your true friends ARE your true friends and they will do ANYTHING to help you out. Mine cooked for me for two months, and my sons swim team collected money and frequent flyer miles behind my back to send me, my husband and my son to Arizona this past summer. They call, offering all kinds of help and I have learned to be able to say "thank you" and allow people to do for me.

2. I learned that my husband and I are MUCH closer than what I had thought. Before I had cancer, we were both off doing our own thing and not spending quality time together like we should have been doing.

3. More than anything, I am trying to instill in my teenage son that life is worth living, and you have to stand up and fight!! Never, ever, give up - not on life or anything in your life!! And I hope so much that when my days are over, that I will have taught him to live up to the last moment with dignity, caring for other people and grace.

Isn't it sad that it took me being diagnosed with cancer to open all this up in my life. So I guess there is a positive side of cancer because there are so many others out there who may never realize the things I have.

God bless you all.

Patti

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One of the positive things that has happened is I've realized how strong I could be. I think I might have "kicked *ss"!!!!

It's not always easy, but I try to appreciate everyday, some of the little things. I read a book that said to try and appreciate certain things like washing dishes. I think I'm doing good on that one. :D

2 days in a row last week I sat in traffic for about 2 hours. I generally think I've become less patient since my cancer, which may not be positive, but... sitting in that traffic I thought to myself... I am HERE, tomorrow is Thanksgiving, I have water and crackers in the car, my cellphone battery was very low, but I have music, so what if my leg is getting tired on the clutch (I have a stick-shift)... I am HERE! :lol:

-Elyse

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There's no doubt that a lung cancer diagnosis and the horrors that follow (and my horrors have been minor so far, compared to so many) give you an attitude adjustment. I appreciate so many things now that I never gave a second thought about before.

The other positive for me is that the chemotherapy seems to have mosquito-proofed me for five months and counting. :D

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The positive side of cancer from a caretaker's point of view...

Our family came together like never before and fought the beast. As we fought the beast, we were able to make memories that must last a lifetime. And when we saw that it was time to lay down our weapons, we were able to say and do those things that were most important to us.

Cancer, as vicious as it can be, allows us the time to make memories.

Lynn

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Some of my favorite things -- about having Stage 4 adenocarcinoma:

1. I don't intend to ever see a dentist again. :)

2. My chances of getting Alzheimer's (always my biggest fear) have dropped to zero.

3. My chances of going blind from macular degeneration (like my father and his 3 brothers) (my 2nd biggest fear) have dropped to zero.

4. The likelihood of my spending my final years in a diaper in a nursing home have dropped to zero.

5. The chances of my never seeing another Republican elected President are high. :) :) :)

Seriously, my heart goes out to the younger people in my medical situation who have young children -- but I'm 64, have done everything I ever wanted to do, and figure I'm going to avoid the only things that frighten me. Of course, I'd be delighted if I woke up and this was all a dream -- but it could sure be worse.

Ellen in PA

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Oh My God Ellen, :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol: Okay, okay okay, this was too toooooo funny, but Damn Girl, your ONLY and I STRESS THE WORD O N L Y 64 years YOUNG. Are you KIDDING ME??? :wink: My hubby is 64.

But, I gotta agree there's always the FLIP side of things!!! LOL!

Gotta tell ya though, I have a good friend of mine who is a STAGE IV, 9 year lung cancer survivor and she just turned 70 in August. So crap happens and you just might live a very looonnnng life and maybe die in the middle of making love or something like that. ( kind of my wishful way of thinking)! LOL LOL LOL !!!!

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I have always known I was strong, resilient and fiercely independent. Post dx of advanced lung cancer, I'm still strong and resilient but have made some positive adjustments to my independent streak. I was so fatigued through most of my treatments that I had to learn to depend on my husband. He really took care of me and I had to let him. I still joke that I have to be careful or I'll become that little old lady whose husband drives her everywhere!

Some of the positive aspects of cancer for me was learning not to sweat the small stuff, letting go of childhood financial fears (don't worry about not having enough money, you never will have enough lol), and finally letting go of my workaholic tendencies. Having retired my counseling practice, I'm free to travel with my husband while he works. I also have a new appreciation of people and our common histories. I was already reconnecting with old gal friends from grade school and high school in recent years, and the way they rallied around me when I visted NJ in July was heartwarming. My husband and I reconnected with even more old friends this current trip when we revisited the Kutztown area where we lived 22 years ago. It was fabulous to meet old friends and feel like we just picked up where we left off even though we haven't seen each other in years.

I've let go of old family hurts and resentments, and I find myself dealing with those people with humor and patience. Life is too short. Most importantly, I appreciate the fact that working through the bumps and bruises and near divorce in 44 years of marriage (we're an opposites attract kind of couple) was so worth the effort. In spite of all the people who care about us, when it comes right down to it, we really only have each other.

Judy writing from a WalMart parking lot in VA!

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Absolutely, the struggle with cancer can have positive results. If we are still here, it's hard not to appreciate every day, every moment, more. To cherish our relationships, the love we give and the love we receive. To feel compassion for those less fortunate.

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"ts"]The hair on my legs and under my arms does not need shaving every other day. First time in 40 years.

Stephanie has inspired me! LOL! The hair on my head is finally growing in it's about an inch long now and it is curly (yah!) and it is as soft as a baby bunny! Next sorry guys you probably won't relate, but I finally no longer have my "monthly", double yah!!!! :wink:

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Rich,

Great topic. We all tend to focus on the negative, especially me. But I have learned a lot through this journey and there are some positives. I have become much closer to my daughter and the people who matter. I realized how important those special moments are. I take nothing for granted. I have way more empathy for other people and will do whatever it takes to help anyone in need. My compassion for human life grows everyday.

Thank you for keeping me in check :)

Libby

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all of you...survivors who show us inspiration each and every day- are the positive side of lung cancer.

It's no longer sweating the small stuff and remembering that it's people- not things- that are so important.

And telling people how you feel- right away. Showing graditude and care and compassion like I could never imagine.

The importance of standing up for the medical care you deserve.

It's treasuring memory making opportunities...

All of those things are the positives that came out of it for me.

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Material things are just that Its the emotional and mental things and what not that make the difference in this fight and life!!

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Well this will be a little bit of an odd way to tell a positive story but I'll tell it. My Dad was diagnosed with lung cancer when I was about 20 years old. He was on an oxygen concentrator the whole 9 yards. I was smoking at the time and I knew he wasn't in good shape. He promised me he'd be alive to see me get married. I knew he really had to fight to keep his promise. He died after my husband and I got home from our honeymoon. To this day that is the greatest act of fatherhood I have ever witnessed. My Dad is my hero.

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Nice story - even better if you tell us you quit smoking as well? Welcome to LUNGevity and LCSC - anything you need from us? An ear, a word of advice? Please introduce yourself and let us know.

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Great story. We have heard it in various forms before--people staying alive for weddings, the birth of grandchildren, seeing a young man or woman graduate from HS. It's always inspiring and surprising to know that even against this villian LC, some people have amazing will.

Judy in KW

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When the doctor said the word cancer in relation to me while my husband and daughter were in the room with me I knew from the looks on their faces that the first thought that came to their minds was death. That did not come to my mind, not right then anyway. The first thought I had was oh great, now I am going to have to re-schedule a trip my husband and I had planned to Denver until after my surgery. The plane tickets were bought and a room and rental car were reserved, what a nuisance to have to re-schedule. Yep, that is how my mind works. I had my surgery went on my trip and had a great time. Came home and found out my tumor was ALK+ and started on a drug called Xalkori with no side effects, so thankful for that. I rarely think about the cancer because I feel so good at this time. I do my research, listen to my body for any signs of a problem but for the most part I am not limited to doing anything I was doing before my diagnosis. I am eating healthier and getting a little exercise each day and staying connected to the Lungevity site to keep up on all the other survivors and to give a little input from time to time. I am not foolish enough to think that there are not bad times ahead but for now, today at this moment I am going to live it fully and happily. Thank everyone who post for sharing your stories of hope and encouragement, they mean so much to a newbie at this. God be with you all as you travel your roads.

 

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Although there are probably not any "positives" to the disease itself, there are wonderful positives that come from your diagnosis

I realized that everyday IS a gift from God...treat it as such

I realized that my family is what keeps me moving forward everyday....love them

I realized that my friends love and support me always...be grateful for them

I realized that there are many people worse off than myself...do what I can to help them

I realized that I can not take one minute of one day for granted or my family members or my friends, ever

I realized I can make a difference in the life of someone that is suffering...be that difference

I realized that God came into this world with me and He will be the one that goes out of this world with me, I will put Him first in my life for the rest of my life.

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