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NanMT

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Hi, my husband is a Viet Nam Vet and was exposed to Agent Orange while he was there.  Forty four years later he has been diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer with mets to the liver, lymph nodes and spine.  Right now we have him on cannabis oil doing the 90 day protocol, he is a little past the 30 gram mark, working his way to 60 grams next month.  What I really could use help with is discussing what kind of diet should he be on.  I am so confused with this subject.  I've heard Keto, Vegan, I've been told it's ok for him to eat meat and eggs, etc.  I have been told by several people that Vegan is the only way to go because he needs to be on a plant based diet.  We are now fighting and hardly speaking, I am so frustrated, tired and stressed at this point.  I could really use some guidance when it comes to diet and what he is allowed and not allowed to eat.  What are others in this group doing as far as meals go?  TIA

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Welcome,

I am not going to be much help as for a specific diet as my mom receives chemo with her immunotherapy and she eats whatever doesn't taste vile or makes her heartburn worse on that particular day.  At initial diagnosis, my mom was referred to oncology staff who discussed the various side effects of her treatment and discussed diet.  While receiving chemo the staff would regularly come to see her and give her tips on how to deal with any side effects or her diet concerns.  Perhaps the oncologist that diagnosed your husband could give some ideas or there is someone within the department who consults on diet???

I'm sorry to hear that the stress of this situation is causing a rift between you and your husband.  Most of us has felt this, even if just for a short time, as we deal with the stress of living with cancer.  I imagine it is very hard being in the same house and around one another all of the time when the both of you have so many emotions to deal with.  I hope that once the two of you find your "new norm" (whatever that's supposed to mean!), that the two of you can treasure your time together once again.

Take Care,

Steff

 

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Hello Nan.  My husband was a Vietnam Vet.  He was in the Navy --- so not on shore.  He did get cancer.  Perhaps tied to the ship building he was 

involve in .  They were aboard with lots of aspestos  exposure in the shipyard.  He was part of  the first crew aboard 2 ships being built,  The commissioning crew 

for the USS Jesse L. Brown and the USS Virginia.     His cancer spread fast.

 

Keep us posted on how your husband  is doing. I know this is a very stressful time.

Is he seeing an Oncologist ?  I don't know what kind of diet you are following.  They say sugar helps cancer grow faster.

To heal at all I wound think you would need a healthy diet with protein and vegetables and fruit.

Keep us posted.

 

Donna G

 

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11 hours ago, Steff said:

Welcome,

I am not going to be much help as for a specific diet as my mom receives chemo with her immunotherapy and she eats whatever doesn't taste vile or makes her heartburn worse on that particular day.  At initial diagnosis, my mom was referred to oncology staff who discussed the various side effects of her treatment and discussed diet.  While receiving chemo the staff would regularly come to see her and give her tips on how to deal with any side effects or her diet concerns.  Perhaps the oncologist that diagnosed your husband could give some ideas or there is someone within the department who consults on diet???

I'm sorry to hear that the stress of this situation is causing a rift between you and your husband.  Most of us has felt this, even if just for a short time, as we deal with the stress of living with cancer.  I imagine it is very hard being in the same house and around one another all of the time when the both of you have so many emotions to deal with.  I hope that once the two of you find your "new norm" (whatever that's supposed to mean!), that the two of you can treasure your time together once again.

Take Care,

Steff

 

Thank you Steff.  Today was a better day.  We're both feeling anxious and realize we will have bad days.  Hoping to hear good news about this cancer being gone. 

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6 hours ago, Donna G said:

Hello Nan.  My husband was a Vietnam Vet.  He was in the Navy --- so not on shore.  He did get cancer.  Perhaps tied to the ship building he was 

involve in .  They were aboard with lots of aspestos  exposure in the shipyard.  He was part of  the first crew aboard 2 ships being built,  The commissioning crew 

for the USS Jesse L. Brown and the USS Virginia.     His cancer spread fast.

 

Keep us posted on how your husband  is doing. I know this is a very stressful time.

Is he seeing an Oncologist ?  I don't know what kind of diet you are following.  They say sugar helps cancer grow faster.

To heal at all I wound think you would need a healthy diet with protein and vegetables and fruit.

Keep us posted.

 

Donna G

 

Hi Donna.  Sorry to hear of your husband got cancer as well.  My husband did go see an oncologist.  His oncologist suggested doing a biopsy, husband refused as was concerned cancer would spread more.  When he told the oncologist he wasn't going to do the biopsy, he was told not to bother coming back.  Agree, sugar is very bad for cancer patients, my husband doesn't eat anything with sugar or processed foods.  Someone suggested Keto in another group I am in and I was wondering since you are allowed to eat meat from Keto and potatoes from Vegan, if you could use both diet plans.  I was told you need to stick to one or the other.  So it seems everyone has an opinion, and maybe what I need to do is just go with what I think would work best for him since he is more of a meat eater.  I will keep you posted, thank you.

 

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I am curious, Nan; how was he diagnosed if he hasn’t had a biopsy? What kind of lung cancer does he have? I assume that means he was also not tested for mutations. The oncologist probably explained to him that there are treatments available now that involve taking a pill if he tests positive for a mutation that has an approved targeted drug. It sounds like you are not going with “traditional” medicine at all. Others have made that choice and have probably done a lot more research on diet, herbs, supplements, etc. Perhaps you could find a holistic medicine professional in your area. I try to eat a common sense diet and drink lots of water. By the way, I believe that sugar contributing to cancer is a myth, although it is true that it is not good for any of us (occasionally/in moderation?).

cindy

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Nan,

Fortunately, everyone can exercise choices in medical treatment.  I suggest reading The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee to validate your choice.  Alternatively, you can watch a PBS documentary by the same title.  Here is the link.  The book and video about the book are a "biography" of cancer.  It is unusual in that the information is presented without too much medical terminology so it is an easy read.

Stay the course.

Tom

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On 12/13/2017 at 7:39 PM, CIndy0121 said:

I am curious, Nan; how was he diagnosed if he hasn’t had a biopsy? What kind of lung cancer does he have? I assume that means he was also not tested for mutations. The oncologist probably explained to him that there are treatments available now that involve taking a pill if he tests positive for a mutation that has an approved targeted drug. It sounds like you are not going with “traditional” medicine at all. Others have made that choice and have probably done a lot more research on diet, herbs, supplements, etc. Perhaps you could find a holistic medicine professional in your area. I try to eat a common sense diet and drink lots of water. By the way, I believe that sugar contributing to cancer is a myth, although it is true that it is not good for any of us (occasionally/in moderation?).

cindy

Hi Cindy, he had an MRI and a PET scan.  MRI said he had lesions on his spine which after the MRI, the PET scan was ordered.  PET scan showed cancer in the lung as primary withmetastasis to the lymph nodes, liver and spine.  We don't know what kind of lung cancer he has, as when he heard it was inoperable and he was terminal, he decided then he wasn't going to do chemo.  I had an appt for him to see an oncologist naturo, but had to cancel, as he wasn't feeling well enough to go.  Hopefully I can reschedule this coming week and get him in.

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An oncologist told me my cancer was “terminal” too. (That was my one and only visit with THAT doctor!) I was diagnosed with stage IV metastatic NSCLC. That was 3 and 1/2 years ago. I understand that a tissue biopsy is more invasive than some people are willing to do. But it would give you and your oncologist so much more information about his cancer and his treatment options. Chemotherapy isn’t (necessarily) the only option. Whoever you DO see next, ask about the possibility of a liquid biopsy if he refuses a needle one. You must feel really torn about respecting his wishes and what you might want to see happen. That’s an admirable thing to put the patient’s wishes ahead of your own, but another suggestion is that you both learn a little more about what’s possible and if you’re hopeful about any option, maybe you could agree on a treatment plan you can both feel good about. To automatically reject a biopsy and (the possibility of) chemotherapy tells me he owes it to both of you to listen to some of the newer treatments that are available for different lung cancers. 

The diagnosis is stressful enough, and, trust me, it causes enough additional stress on a marriage even when the patient and spouse agree on how to proceed. I am being painfully honest, but I’m sharing from my own experience. You need each other right now and will even more so depend upon one another as he continues a treatment. I would recommend you take advantage of the support available with your health care professionals and decide upon a plan you can both agree to proceed with. You will either learn all too soon that the arguing is interfering with both of your health and not worth it or he will out-and-out refuse to learn or try anything. It’s important to always have some hope. Nobody should either be telling you or your husband that it is terminal and inoperable. That’s not simple poor “bedside manner”; it’s not necessarily true anymore. But you need all the information. Some metastases can be radiated at some point, no two lung cancers are the same,  (even when their cause was the same. Vietnam veterans developed bile duct cancers and mesothelioma and various types of lung cancer.)and his genetic profile and expression of certain  proteins and other factors have everything to do with the best treatment for him. Where did he do his diagnosis and initial consultations? Seek a second opinion; that could be all he needs to feel more positive a about proceeding. Wishing  you all the best. You are in a very difficult situation already, and shutting each other out is definitely not helpful. That I can say with certainty. Let me know how you’re doing.

Cindy

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