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Submitted by Bobbie

I was diagnosed with SCLC January 2009 and as of today, 10/6/15, there is nothing in my lung except a scar from radiation. No sign of cancer. I beat the odds. I had 5 rounds of Chemo and started chest radiation after the second round. I started PCI 2 weeks after the final chest radiation. My radiologist gave me a lower dosage for the PCI and an additional 2 treatments because I also have MS and PCI causes demyelination. I am cold all the time. I used to be hot. I don't sleep well. I am scar

KatieB

KatieB

 

Submitted by Katie Gilley

My hubby of 19 years, Jeff was diagnosed with stage 4 NSCLC on July 31, 2015. He has the EFGR mutation and is responding well to Tarceva. He is 49, never smoker. He has three tumors in his lungs and a page and a half of mets in his bones! Lots of tumors. He lost 35lbs and he was already a lean bean. I tell you all this, so you know there is hope. He was in bed for two and a half months. Two days ago he was climbing a ladder and swinging a hammer. He was on 75mcg of Fentanyl and now is is NO pain

KatieB

KatieB

 

Therapy Online?

The nature of the World Wide Web is the essence of its creators. We’ve made a conduit of ideas and information that chronicles every facet of human behavior and lots of non-human behavior. One can find a searchable version of the bible and then click to something that would be an embarrassing find in the bible. The Internet is encyclopedia, newspaper, entertainment, and abstraction all available with only one precondition, access. I was diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer in 2004. The Int

Tom Galli

Tom Galli

 

Few Patients Understand Their Prognosis

Just reported is a Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University study showing but 5% of terminally ill cancer patients understand the gravity of their disease and prognosis. Moreover, only 23 percent of these had a discussion about life expectancy with their doctor. At first pass, I questioned the validity of the percentages.  They were so low they bordered on unbelievable. This had to be mainstream press sensationalism at work! Then I spoke with an expert, and she convince

Tom Galli

Tom Galli

 

10 Steps to Surviving Lung Cancer from a Survivor

MY STEPS TO SURVIVING A LUNG CANCER DIAGNOSIS Step 1 – Invest in sophisticated diagnosics before diagnosis If you smoke, were a long-term smoker, or are in an occupation that exposes you to carcinogenic toxins (asbestos removal, auto mechanic, painter, etc.), I suggest getting a computed tomography (CT) scan, often called a CAT scan, of the chest once a year. Insurance now covers it and CT will detect tumors far earlier than a chest x-ray. Early detection of small tumors dramatically e

Tom Galli

Tom Galli

 

The Caregiver's Plight

Now, long after the commotion of active treatment, my wife and I often share recollections. Martha is my caregiver and for more than 3 years of near constant therapy she held the long thin line. In doing so, she had to confront my anxiety, discomfort and fear. These were variable; the constant foe was my general irascibility towards medical treatment. Now a 12-year survivor, we both laugh at some of my antics. But during treatment, there was high drama to deal with. It is not easy to watch

Tom Galli

Tom Galli

 

Connecting People to Hope

I recently read a quote from a cancer survivor about online support.  "When I stumble, there are so many virtual hands to catch me.”  This is the same sentiment that has been expressed about LUNGevity’s Lung Cancer Support Community and the many support groups on Facebook.  People impacted by lung cancer can come online and be embraced by others who have walked the same journey and who understand what they may be going thru. There is power in the written word and from receiving support from a gr

KatieB

KatieB

 

Where Did Everyone Go? When People Disappear From Your Life

Where Did Everyone Go? When people disappear (physically or emotionally) after a cancer diagnosis. I have experienced being someone with cancer and being someone who cared for someone with a terminal cancer diagnosis and neither side is a cakewalk. At LUNGevity HOPE Summit s, we talk a lot about survivorship and family relationships in the Caregivers session and I’ve decided that being the caregiver and managing those relationships can be stress-filled and sometimes heartbreaking.

KatieB

KatieB

 

My name is Eleanor

My name is Eleanor I have cancer, but it is not who I am. I am not a number or the result of a lab test. My name is Eleanor I am a baby at my mothers breast. I am a toddler being thrown high in the air by my father and giggling. I am a young girl playing with my dolls and my trucks. I am a teenage girl going on my first date full of nervous anticipation. I am graduating high school and trying to figure out what next. I am a young woman walking down the aisle with the love of my

Cheryncp123

Cheryncp123

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