Jump to content

Blogs

Our community blogs

  1. Almost every lung cancer survivor has a positron emission tomography (PET) scan these days. Now, a PET is often given with a computerized axial tomography (CT) scan.  The diagnostician is a radiologist; a discipline that does not write in lingua franca. What do the report words mean? Here is a summary of my August PET-CT to interpret radiology speak.

    INDICATION: (Why am I getting this scan) “The patient…with non-small cell lung cancer of the right main bronchus diagnosed in 2003 status post pneumonectomy….He has undergone previous surgery for bronchopleural fistula repair…Chemotherapy last administered May 2006…Cyberknife therapy for recurrent disease in March 2007…He more recently has cough and chest discomfort.” That’s me, no doubt, but this summary is important.  Radiologists see many scans and sometimes results are misreported.

    TECHNIQUE: (Test scope and method)  Note details about the accuracy of the CT.  “These images do not constitute a diagnostic-quality CT….” The CT results help to precisely map or locate the PET results but cannot generate a diagnostic grade image.

    COMPARISON: (Other scans reviewed while looking at this one). “Report only (no image reviewed) from PET-CT 3/8/2013.  CT of chest and abdomen 8/22/17 (looked at image).”  A CT scan is normally performed first.  PETs follow and accuracy is enhanced if the radiologist has access to prior images. To improve access, have all your scans done at the same medical facility.

    FINDINGS: (The result) “…showed no convincing PET evidence of FDG-avid (fluorodeoxyglucose — radioactive tagged glucose seeking) recurrent or metastatic disease.” This is what we want to see in the first sentence.  Then, the radiologist peels back the onion with detail.  

    “There is mild heterogeneous hypermetabolism (diverse increased rate of metabolic activity)…with a few small superimposed foci (above the hypermetabolic area that is of particular interest)…more intense activity showing a maximum SUV of 3.5 (SUV — standardized uptake value)….When compared to [past reports] uptake…showed SUVs ranging from 2.6 to 2.9. This is strongly favored to be inflammatory.” Relief —this is my chronic pain site caused by 3 thoracic surgeries in the same location!  

    “A somewhat retractile appearing mass (drawn back into lung tissue)…in the left upper lobe is stable in size…This shows minimal uptake…and is most compatible with the site of treated tumor.” My CyeberKnife-fried tumor scar.  I do love precision radiation!

    What are concern ranges for SUV uptake? First, consider what is measured — cellular metabolic rate; more simply is demand for glucose, the fuel of metabolism.  Cells with high metabolism ingest more tagged glucose. The PET shows differences in consumption (uptake).  SUVs below 2.0 are normal.  SUVs above 2.0 are suspect but between 2.0 and 4.0, uptake could be from injury or inflammation.  Readings above 4.0 tend to be cancer but there can be other explanations. Higher than 4.0 is likely cancer, especially when paired with a CT find. Cancer demands glucose to fuel mitosis or growth by cellular division.  

    Get and keep copies of all your diagnostic imaging.  Keep track of the findings.  I use a spreadsheet to record date, location and indications.  Dr. Google is a great source for medical definitions. The best possible outcome for any scan is NED (no evidence of disease).  May NED be with you.

    Stay the course. 

  2. Facing a lung cancer diagnosis changes a person’s perspective about what matters in life and what doesn’t. Being diagnosed with cancer makes you put absolutely everything else to the side, or totally out of mind.  You have the chance to let back in only the things that really matter back into your conscious mind. If you can do that, and spend more time focusing on things that really matter in the present moment, you will have completely changed and improved your mind and your life. I still get caught up in feeling anxious or scared about what might happen in the future and the negative impact it could have on my family, especially my wife and daughters. What’s helped me has been to realize that they are thoughts – they don’t have a physical presence anywhere and if you observe them but don’t chase after them, they go away.

    If I could give advice to someone newly diagnosed, I’d probably want to say a few things.

    1.       Slow down. Information is going to be coming at you really fast and it can be overwhelming, especially with the internet making everything move at hyper speed.  Take your time to digest what’s out there in terms of treatment options, support systems, heavy medical information, etc.

    2.       Get yourself into a respected cancer center as soon as possible. Find an oncologist that you trust and have a good relationship with, and then TRUST that doctor.

    3.       Take everything, except what your oncologist tells you to your face, with a grain of salt.  There is a ton of real, semi-bogus and totally bogus information out there about magical cures and treatments.  Ask your doctor about all of them but, in the end, do what he or she advises.

    4.       Take a step back, look at the road ahead as objectively as you can and try to be practical.  It is the “C” word but, after all, it’s an illness not a curse or a death sentence.  Come up with a treatment plan together with your doctor, follow that plan and do what you need to do in order to stay healthy

    5.       Don’t give cancer more power than it already has by thinking you can’t face it and just giving up.  You can face it.  Maybe not today, or all the time, but eventually and most of the time you can.

    Lung cancer is just the same as any other kind of cancer. It will take the people you love just as heartlessly as any other form of the disease.    It’s really good at taking people away; men and women, smokers and non-smokers, old and young, any race and origin.  In fact, it’s better at that than most other cancers.  We could all get cancer, and none of us would deserve it.  We should fight it with research funding, trials, promoting new and existing treatments, by helping people pay for treatment, and everything else at our disposal. Not giving lung cancer the fight it deserves leaves us all that much more powerless to stop it from taking away someone we love.

    garth_family.png

  3. LaurenH
    Latest Entry

    I was diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer in September 2014. Like many people, my diagnosis came as a huge surprise to me and my family. A friend told us about the Breathe Deep Kansas City Walk that was happening in our area. We called our team The Village People because we like to say, “It takes a village” to fight this thing. The Breathe Deep walks provide an opportunity to raise awareness and money in your own community. It’s very powerful.

    I attended my first National HOPE Summit in Washington, D.C. in 2015. Lung cancer is so isolating and overwhelming. Then you get there and meet other survivors and caregivers and experts. I feel like I always leave HOPE Summit with 150 new friends and then I don’t feel so lonely when I get home.

    The next year my wife and I attended the 2016 Hope Summit together, she finally understood how these friends I had been talking about for the last year could be so intertwined with my health and healing.  We made even more friends and keep in touch all year long through social media and other events around the country.

    Once you get to HOPE Summit, it’s so empowering that you want to get involved. I found out about the LifeLine Support Partner program at HOPE Summit. LifeLine is nice because you can work remotely and there’s an opportunity to give back. My mentor, Matt Ellefson, is one of those people who LF relies on to have multiple mentees and he was very inspirational for me because of our similarities and what we’ve been through. It was a very good fit.

    LUNGevity tries to match people based on age, gender, diagnosis and geographic location. It’s always felt very comfortable. I’ve had mentees assigned to me and we usually have a really good talk and maybe hear from them once or twice and that’s all they need at that time. We talk on an as needed basis. Hopefully, I’m encouraging people depending on where they are. A lot of the time, the person is newly diagnosed and it’s very fresh with them. As a mentor, you have to put yourself back in that frame of mind. It’s important to remember that you’re not there to fix their situation. You’re there to listen to what they need and let the conversation evolve.

    The most rewarding thing about being a volunteer is being able to help someone else by sharing my experiences and the ups and downs that I’ve had. If I give any advice it’s always to find a specialist who is an expert when it comes to your diagnosis type or mutation. It’s so important to be very confident in your medical team. Don’t be afraid to get a second opinion. If your doctor isn’t jiving with you, keep looking. It just feels good to help somebody through this because as we all say, it’s really hard for other people who haven’t gone through it to understand.

    When I was diagnosed, I was given 9-18 months. I’m coming up on 3 years and 11 months and my wife and I are going out to Los Angeles next month for the Stand Up for Cancer telecast on my 4th Cancerversary. I hope that my efforts as a LifeLine volunteer will inspire the people I mentor to do the same for others. I’m a big believer in paying it forward. It’s a big world and there are a lot of people affected by this disease.

     

    IMG_4484.jpg

  4. I've said it before and I'll say it again:  cancer can be as hard, if not harder, on the loved ones than the patients.  Our family is very close  - I don't have any siblings and my husband and I don't have children.  Our family unit is small.  After 2.5 years, my husband and I have a process.  He goes with me to all of my scan result appointments.  As soon as Super Doc gives us the results, Neal steps out and texts or calls my parents with the updates.  I always want to be with them if we have to give them bad news. My parents live 4 hours away; otherwise, I think they'd crowd into the exam room with us.

    Although we had to give them bad news a couple of weeks ago, we actually had something in our favor.  A lifelong friend of mine was visiting with them on the way to take her daughter to tour a college.  She was able to keep my parents somewhat balanced this time.  I'd been preparing them for the results - figured this was coming.  But no one wants to have to call their parents and tell them the cancer is back.  Stupid cancer.

  5. "Hindsight is 20/20!"

    "You know, in retrospect..."

    "Looking back now, I'd..."

    "If I had it all to do over again..."

    "If I had known then what I know now..."

     

    Chances are, if you're a caregiver, you're guilty of saying at least one of these catchphrases at least a little bit often.

    I know I am. A LOT a bit often!

    Why is that?

    Why is it that we never feel prepared to be a caregiver, and always feel like a little of our well-earned wisdom would have been useful at the beginning of our experience?

     

    Here's what I think: our loved one's diagnosis knocks us for a loop; we stumble, we grasp, we stand back up, we take action, and then we can usually coast for a while--and occasionally, the cycle repeats.

    But: we were never given a chance to study for this test. We weren't given a warning. We catch the curveball using the only skill sets we already have, and we run with it.

     

    Stumble:

    What the **** just happened?

    Where do we go from here?

     

    Grasp:

    Get our heads back in focus, get info, get a plan.

     

    Stand back up:

    We go through our days--every day--as best we can. Somehow, stuff gets done. If it doesn't, we move on.

     

    Take action:

    Take the info we found and start acting on the plan: a testing plan, a treatment plan, a scheduling plan, a support plan, any plan.

     

    Coast:

    The plans in place gradually become blessedly routine. The less work we have to do to establish the plans as the plans settle, the more surprised we are that our days do still revolve--but they just revolve around something we never would have expected. (This is sometimes referred to as the "new normal.")

     

    Any caregiver is familiar with this basic framework. 

    But:

    Finding the way that this paradigm can shift and meld onto any particular family, situation, or lifestyle?

    There's the rub.

    That's the part that's not so simple.

    The GOOD news is: that's the part where other caregivers are the best and most helpful resource.

    What calendaring app do you use? What foods help with nausea? What do you say to your kids? How do you organize medical information? Which chores should I prioritize? How can I draw boundaries with my family? How can I ask my friends for the support I need? How can I communicate better with my loved one's medical team? Where can I go for reliable supplemental information? How do I find self-care time? And, by the way, what IS self-care?

     

    At the end of the day, one thing is patently obvious: with most new life experiences, you may not even know what resource/help/knowledge you need (or needed!) until you are well on your way. Caregiving is a prime example.

     

    To that end: the best and most helpful source--the reference with the breadth and depth of life experience to draw upon--are your fellow caregivers. 

     

    LUNGevity has TONS of ways to connect with a network of folks with similar experiences. Just to name a few: the LUNGevity Caregivers Facebook group (http://facebook.com/groups/1009865522379898), the LifeLine mentorship program (http://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/peer-to-peer-mentoring), and the Caregivers message boards here on the Lung Cancer Support Community (http://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/lung-cancer-support-community).

    (Not to mention the Caregiver materials library at http://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/caregiver-resource-center).

     

    Also: LUNGevity hosts the only regular caregiver-focused Twitter chat in the lung cancer advocacy field. We meet on Twitter under the hashtag #LCCaregiver every first Wednesday of the month, starting at 8:00pm Eastern time. This is a sort of live chat room, addressing issues that caregivers want and need addressed. All are welcome!

     

    This month, we will be discussing this exact conundrum: what do you wish you had known before you became a caregiver? What can your fellow advocates (and advocacy organizations like LUNGevity) do to help you learn what you need to know at the front end? How can we help you "grasp" the info you need in order to make a smooth transition into your role, and get settled as quickly as possible in a somewhat comfortable routine? How can you be supported in your role by being given notice ahead of time of what you may need or want to know, do, or think of?

     

    How can you catch the signals ahead of other curveballs?

     

    To assist in answering these questions, and to continue this conversation, we'll be hosting a sort of "Caregiving 101" for our chat this Wednesday. Several experienced caregivers will offer their best advice--the things they wished they had known before starting their work of supporting their loved ones through a lung cancer diagnosis. Please join us to learn together; to hear from others who understand the ups and downs of what you're going through; to share your stories and your advice; and to help us understand how we can better help each other. 

     

    Wednesday, June 6th, 8pmET, on Twitter, at #LCCaregiver.

     

    I can't wait to "see" you there! Thank you, my friends!

     

     

     

    IMG_8364.JPG

  6. Judy M.
    Latest Entry

    Had my last chemo on Aug. 3 and C. T. scans of chest, abdomen, and pelvis toward the end of August. The 3 tumors in my lungs had shrunk and still no spread of the cancer seen anywhere else. Have recovered from chemo side effects and just been enjoying not having to think about or battle the cancer for a while. Don't seem to have any long term effects from the radiation. Had a short bout of more coughing and shortness of breath right after last chemo. But from what I've read this could have been the result of the chemo or the radiation or both. A short course of steroids took care of that and have had no trouble since then. Will be having P. E. T. scan in early Dec. So far, have been happy with my treatment. I believe it was the best I could have been given in the circumstances. 

    Judy M. 

  7. Don't help me.

    I am a fiercely independant woman.  i am a survivor.  I am strong.  I will beat this (insert cancer type/condition here) and my life will inspire others. If I show weakness then it wins.  I will get up everyday and tackle the world.  I will do my hair and put on lipstick and look as amazing as I can so no one will know that I am "sick". I will not ask anyone for help.  I will carry all of the groceries into the house.  I will change the water bottle on the water cooler.  I will carry packages to Fex Ex.  I will walk the dogs. I will drive myself to scan appointments and blood draws and biopsies.  I will wash and dry laundry and I will never miss a single day of work.  

    Please help me.  

    I get up everyday in pain.  It takes me longer these days to do my hair and put on my lipstick.  I carry all the groceries into the house and I have to sit, catch my breath before I put them away.  I wait until I am practically dying of thirst before I change the water bottle on the cooler.  I carry the heavy packages into Fed Ex one 5 pound box at a time.  I no longer walk the dogs- that's what the doggy door is for.  I drive myself to scan appointments and wring my hands and bounce my leg because I am afraid of bad results.  I drive myself to biospies and sometime I cry when I'm alone and putting my clothes back on.  I can take laundry for 4 people up the stairs and put them away, but my body will hurt for two days after.   I never miss a single day of work- but sometimes I am working from my bed.

    It's easier for me to help others than it is to help myself.  While I want to do everything myself- there are times that I get really annoyed if those I love don't offer to help me.  

    To their credit how can they know I need help when I don't look or act "sick"? 

    Ask me.

     

     

    s.jpg

     

    • 1
      entry
    • 6
      comments
    • 700
      views

    Recent Entries

    Hi all, I hope this is not stupid. I'm going to see a pulmonary doctor Saturday and I'm scared to hear the news. I'm almost positive I have lung cancer. Can someone tell what the first consultation will be like? thank you!

    • 1
      entry
    • 7
      comments
    • 1310
      views

    Recent Entries

    My name is Eleanor

    I have cancer, but it is not who I am.

    I am not a number or the result of a

    lab test.

    My name is Eleanor

    I am a baby at my mothers breast.

    I am a toddler being thrown high in

    the air by my father and giggling.

    I am a young girl playing with my

    dolls and my trucks.

    I am a teenage girl going on my

    first date full of nervous anticipation.

    I am graduating high school and

    trying to figure out what next.

    I am a young woman walking down

    the aisle with the love of my life.

    I am an employee and a homemaker

    I am a new mother.

    I love my family, my friends, roses, cooking

    and reading.

    I love watching sappy old movies and

    going through a box of tissues while

    munching on popcorn.

    I love to dance and sing.

    I am a woman, a wife, a mother, a sister,

    a granddaughter,a niece, an aunt, I am

    a grandmother and a great grandmother.

    I am all of these things and more but what

    I am not is a disease.

    I have cancer and it may destroy my body

    but it cannot touch my spirit or my soul.

    So you see although my body may have cancer it does

    not have me.

    My name is Eleanor.

  8. PeggieH

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 554
      views

    No blog entries yet

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 295
      views

    No blog entries yet

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 227
      views

    No blog entries yet

×