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  2. BridgetO

    VATs update

    Good advice from Tom and Curt! I found a 12 inch high foam wedge to be really helpful for comfort in sleeping. Rest a lot, but keep moving, too. Short walks will help you get your lungs back in order. Do you have prescription pain meds? If not, maybe you need some for a few days. Transition to ibuprofen/tylenol, if you can take them, ASAP. My doctor reommended alternating doses of the two. Hang in there, it gets easier.. You'll probably get pathology results at your post-op appointment. Bridget O
  3. Curt

    VATs update

    Hi Steph. Monday is REALLY soon to be sweating the spirometer results. It took me months to get back to where I was pre-surgery. The important thing is I did. Don’t rush it. Give your body a chance to heal. The pain does go away but it takes a while. It took me about a month to really get back in the swing of things. Walk as much as you can, use the spirometer as much as you can and SLEEP the rest of the time. You’ll get back sooner than you think.
  4. Yesterday
  5. Tom Galli

    VATs update

    Steph, I completely understand your frustration. I had a complete pneumonectomy (right lung removed) and pain, sleeping after discharge, and spirometer exercise all resulted in frustration. And anxiousness, well I had that malady in spades waiting for biopsies, scan results and post-op reports. I wrote this a while back to explain how I dealt with sleep after my surgeries. A recliner may be the best option for a while. Sleeping elevated moves the weight of the chest (and healing incisions) to the hips and therefore lessons the pain. If sleep continues to be a problem, consider a high density foam mattress and an electrically adjustable bed. Mattress stores sell wedge pillows that can substitute for a high density foam mattress and adjustable bed. Go to the store and try out the pillow to ensure you get the right angle of elevation. The mattress and adjustable bed changed my post surgical life, although I still struggle to get a good night's sleep. Do continue to use the spirometer and get out of bed frequently and walk around. These actions will speed your recovery. And, avoid school-aged children; the last thing you need is a chest cold to complicate the problems you are already dealing with. Welcome here. More questions, fire away. Stay the course. Tom
  6. Kelly, Use of the word "curable" as an outcome for any form of lung cancer is hard to fathom. About 10 years ago, my oncologist introduced me to the term no evidence of disease (NED) and said that was the outcome the oncology community was aiming for. From your post, I glean your mom is diagnosed with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer with a primary in the lung and two mets. Any stage of small cell lung cancer is difficult to manage or treat. Often small cell responds positively to chemotherapy but quickly develops resistance to drugs and spreads rapidly. I've read about clinical trials of combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy and these are showing promising results. While she completes here current therapy, you might want to investigate your mother's eligibility for an immunotherapy clinical trail. Here is a resource you might use. I'd also ask her treatment team about trial eligibility. Here is a member's experience of treating small cell with combination chemotherapy (Carboplatin & Etoposide, and the immunotherapy drug Tecentriq) after a recurrence after successful first-line treatment. And, note the emerging immunotherapy treatment options after recurrence for small cell lung cancer here. Note the FDA has approved three immunotherapy drugs for treatment of extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (read Treatment Options for small cell lung cancer and scroll all the way down to see the Immunotherapy section). So, while I wouldn't use the word curable, I would use the words no evidence of disease. Immunotherapy is having a huge impact on both non small cell and small cell cancer treatment. So there may be two paths forward for your mom, even with extensive stage: a clinical trial or second line treatment with immunotherapy. There might even be a third to combine with the aforementioned: stereotactic radiation (SBRT) of the spine and bladder mets. Welcome here. Stay the course. Tom
  7. Steph1235

    VATs update

    Hi everyone, I had my VATs surgery on Monday and the wedge resection turned into a full lobectomy to remove my lower right lobe as the nodule was cancer. They also removed several lymph nodes and I will know more about them once I get the pathology report. I was out of surgery late Monday evening as the surgery took longer than expected and sent home Wed afternoon. I was feeling better but I think the locals are wearing off because I’m starting to feel more pain in my chest and on my sides. Does the crushing chest pain at night get better? I can’t sleep in bed only in recliner right now. I’m also only getting my spirometer to about 1000 and feeling frustrated. I’m also anxious since I wasn’t given any other info than it was cancer. I’m feel defeated today.
  8. Mally

    Port?

    I'm so glad you got the port and that your happy with it ...
  9. My mom was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer after several months of mystery symptoms (weight loss, headaches, hallucinations). She has a tumor on her lung that is inoperable due to its proximity to the heart and possible mets on her spine and bladder (a small spot on each). The doctor initially thought it was non-small cell but after biopsy confirmed that it is small cell lung cancer. In general, I'm just very confused about what the prognosis is. The oncologist that did the biopsy and the nurse that administered the first chemo said that it was curable. Yes, curable. Exactly what they said. Not manageable or treatable. My mom's own oncologist (different from the one that did the biopsy) is also very optimistic. But on the prescriptions (written by her oncologist), stage is listed as IV and small cell. And I know that small cell is staged as limited and extensive, which is why this is all the more confusing. I'm concerned that a doctor would use the word curable when talking about such an aggressive cancer. Someone help?!
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  12. Lin wilki

    Port?

    I am only 6 weeks into my immunotherapy trial. Infusion every 2 weeks. Nurses having trouble finding a good vein. Should I get a port? Doc said before I started I didn’t need one but I’m looking at the long view. Anyone else make the decision to get a port?
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