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Tom Galli

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Tom Galli last won the day on November 18

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About Tom Galli

  • Rank
    MODERATOR
  • Birthday 09/23/1950

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  • US State
    TEXAS
  • Gender
    Male
  • Status
    Lung cancer patient/survivor
  • Interests
    Author of Scanziety, an ebook published on Amazon. Treatment history https://sites.google.com/a/redtoenail.org/chronicles-demo/home/tom-galli

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  1. Tom Galli

    Stage 4

    Mark, I’m so very sorry to learn of your mom’s diagnosis. Your question of what to expect in coming months could be best answered by a hospice provider. Once during treatment I faced a similar predicament. My therapy was not arresting my lung cancer. We decided to look into hospice care and we were impressed with the provider and method. I did not enter hospice because a new FDA precision radiation treatment was approved for treatment of my type of lung cancer. But, when I again face an end of life situation, I will engage hospice care. Stay the course. Tom
  2. Tom Galli

    Keytruda

    Linda, Ice Cream, morning noon and night! Stay the course. Tom
  3. Tom Galli

    Mom's PET Scan Results

    Sandy, Welcome here. My thoughts on your mom's PET scan? It appears she has stage IV cancer. Relying on the first biopsy, one might conclude adenocarcinoma as a subtype of NSCLC. The left supraclavicular node, thyroid and band of increased uptake to the left of the mediastinum may suggest her primary cancer is in the tissue between the lung and interior chest wall (my guess). She also has numerous mets to the bone (pelvis and leg), all of which are of concern, but note the potential involvement of the spine with proximity to L2 and L3, T5 and T9 and C3 and C4. But, I'm not a doctor so don't rely on my opinion. Advice? Although pretty standard, I'd inquire if biopsy tissue was sent for lab analysis to determine suitability for targeted therapy and or immunotherapy. You've not reported your mom's age or complicating medical problems, heart disease or diabetes for example. Your mom's overall health and biopsy results will dictate how aggressive her treatment might be. Very aggressive would be precision radiation to mets in the leg, pelvis and spinal chord along with combination chemotherapy, perhaps administered with concurrent immunotherapy. Less aggressive might be just chemotherapy alone. Palliative radiation may be given if bone mets start to produce pain. To be honest, there is no good news in the PET scan. You'll need to steel yourself to help your mother make choices about how to treat her cancer. These will be hard decisions. Stay the course. Tom
  4. Tom Galli

    Keytruda

    Linda, I know the feeling. Lung cancer is frightening and brain mets are very serious expansions. If the mets are very small, radiation oncologists often wait till they have a larger target for precision radiation. There are two types of precision radiation commonly used to address brain mets: SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy) and IMRT (Image Modulated Radiation Therapy). I had the former to address a tumor in my lung and my daughter had the latter to fry a meningioma in her brain near her optic nerve. Here is more information about these types of radiation. There is also a less precise technique used to treat brain mets: Whole Brain Radiation Therapy. This was once the standard of care before precision methods were discovered but is still sometimes still used. All radiation treatment is painless. Precision radiation is normally administered in one to three doses but it takes time to prepare for treatment. Often several detailed scans are performed to map the tumors in the brain and a computer program is tailored to steer the radiation arm to the proper locations. Ask your dad's radiation oncologist about the plan for addressing the brain mets. Questions -- this is a good place for answers. Stay the course. Tom
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