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All Over The Place

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Posts posted by All Over The Place


  1. Hi Steph,

    Her side effects were awful on the 40mg she had multiple skin splits and hacks on both hands and was at the toilet around 5 times per day. 

    Since the dose adjustment she only has one hack left on her thumb and actually doesn't wear her gloves during the day!  She goes to the toilet once which is much more manageable. 

    Her taste buds have gone a little mad though...

     

    Tom, 

    Thanks very much for that. That would be absolutely amazing. Xx


  2. Hi Everyone,

     

    My mum was on Afatinib 40mg and had a 2 week break before her scan so she had taken it daily for 5 weeks then had her break. 

     

    Her lung mass was 5.2cm and was 4.3cm, her spleen mass was 4.8cm and is now 1cm. 

     

    Her Oncologist has adjusted her dose to 30mg now. 

    How are you all?

     

    Love,

    Angela


  3. Hi Steff,

    When the hospital done my mums CT they said they would check her whole body. At the time I was really nervous however that's when they confirmed it was in her left lung and also her spleen. At that point at least we knew where it was and where it wasn't.

    I would think it would be a precaution with your mums scan as they already know where her lung cancer is. 

    Sending you and your mum love. Xx


  4. Hi Carolyn ❤️️

    I will celebrate 🎉...My mum is on 40mg just now. 

    Awbenbrook, That's amazing!! Thanks to you and Igotjoy. Please stay in touch with me. I have joined the LUNGevity Facebook page now too. Xx


  5. Hi CarolynW,

    Thanks very much for replying to me! Sounds like you are getting on great which is reassuring!  I've let my mum see all the posts!

     

    how did you feel after your first Afatinib? Did side effects start from day one? Xx


  6. Hi,

    My mum was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma Lung Cancer 11th October. She has a 5.2cm mass in her left lung, 4.8cm mass in her spleen along with Mediastinum node involvement. 

    Her Oncologist is starting her on Afatinib (sister drug of Tarceva) 

    Has anyone had any experience with this drug?

     

    Angela. Xx


  7. Hi Tom,

    Thanks very much. I'll have a look shortly 💙 My mums cancer is in her lung and spleen. I would think this would be oligometastatic but does the mediastinum nodes represent another site? Then that would mean primary LC in left lung plus 2 oligo sites?

    💙


  8. Hi All,

    I read this article earlier tonight and just wanted to clarify....

    I know thanks to you guys that lung cancer spread to Mediastinum nodes and spleen can still go NED (I thank you all so much for educating me)

    The article below says:

    "when there are only a few locations of metastatic lung cancer (called oligo-metastatic), some studies suggest that by removing or eradicating each of those cancer deposits with aggressive treatments such as surgery or high-dose, precise radiation called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or SABR, the cancer may be controlled for a long period of time"

    I am guessing as my mum only has metastatic lung cancer in her mediastinum nodes and spleen there for that would be classed as a "few locations" but so far high does radiation / SABR hasn't been mentioned? Should I be mentioning this at her Oncologist appointment on 23rd?

    Have a read, Let me know what you think.  I am stressing out incase I go to this app and don't recognise the treatment the Onc talks about. Xx

     

     

    Article:

    When lung cancer has spread from an original tumor to other sites of the body, it is classified as metastatic (Stage IV), and the goal of treatment is to slow the cancer down with chemotherapy or radiation, but these treatments are unable to eradicate the cancer and survival is usually in the range of only a few months.

    However, when there are only a few locations of metastatic lung cancer (called oligo-metastatic), some studies suggest that by removing or eradicating each of those cancer deposits with aggressive treatments such as surgery or high-dose, precise radiation called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or SABR, the cancer may be controlled for a long period of time.

    In order to further study the possible benefits of aggressive treatments in stage IV lung cancer, researchers completed this meta-analysis which evaluated data of 757 Stage IV NSCLC patients from 20 hospitals worldwide who had between one and five metastatic deposits that were removed surgically or eradicated with high-dose, precise radiotherapy. Patients in the study also had to have had aggressive treatment of their original lung tumor. The intent of the study was to determine whether long term survivors exist after aggressive treatment of oligo-metastases, and to propose a risk classification scheme that could be used to identify which stage IV patients are most likely to benefit from aggressive treatments.

    The analysis determined that the factors that impacted overall survival of the patients included the timing of when the metastases appeared, that is, whether the metastases appeared at the same time as the original lung cancer (synchronous) vs. if they appeared after the original lung cancer (metachronous), whether lymph nodes in the chest were involved (N-stage), and the type of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma vs. other types).

    Using these factors, the study identified three risk groups of patients 1) low risk patients (146), or patients who survived the longest, were those with metachronous metastases, with a 5 year OS of 47.8 percent; 2) intermediate-risk patients (201) -- those with synchronous metastases and no evidence of involved lymph nodes in the chest, with a 5-year OS of 36.2 percent; and 3) high-risk patients (184), or patients with the poorest survival, were those who had synchronous metastases and evidence of lymph node involvement in the chest; they had a five-year OS of 13.8 percent.

    Furthermore, the study found that despite receiving aggressive treatments, more than half of the patients progressed in previously treated areas or developed new sites of disease within one year of treatment.

    "Our study finds some stage IV NSCLC patients can achieve long-term survival after aggressive treatments; however, it is important to note that the patients in this study are a very select minority of stage IV patients who are younger, more physically fit, with a lower burden and slower pace of disease than the average stage IV patient," said lead study author Allison Ashworth, MD, a radiation oncologist who completed the study as part of her training at the London Health Sciences Centre at Western University, in London, Ontario.

    "We hope our study's results will help determine which stage IV NSCLC patients are most likely to benefit from aggressive treatments, and equally as important, help identify those patients most likely to fail, thus sparing them from futile and potentially harmful treatments. Our research, however, cannot answer the question of whether the longer survival is due to the treatments or simply because these patients have less aggressive disease. We must await the results of randomized clinical trials to answer this question. In the meantime, it is our hope that our study will help cancer specialists in making treatment decisions and in the development of clinical trials. 


  9. Hi Guys,

    I have a question for you. After the CT Scan results the Dr said that probably a combo of Chemotherapy, Radiotherapy, surgery. 

    After Adenocarcinoma was confirmed on 11th the other Dr only mentioned Chemo. Do you know why Radiotherapy wouldn’t be included?

    Also, Can someone clarify if Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy are the same thing or seperate?

    They are testing for EGFR,ALK and PDL1 and we see the oncologist 23rd. But I just wondered if it is perhaps done in this order? Chemotherapy, Targeted Therapy then Immunotherapy. 

    Xx


  10. Hi Guys,

    I have a question for you. After the CT Scan results the Dr said that probably a combo of Chemotherapy, Radiotherapy, surgery. 

    After Adenocarcinoma was confirmed on 11th the other Dr only mentioned Chemo. Do you know why Radiotherapy wouldn’t be included?

    Also, Can someone clarify if Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy are the same thing or seperate?

    They are testing for EGFR,ALK and PDL1 and we see the oncologist 23rd. But I just wondered if it is perhaps done in this order? Chemotherapy, Targeted Therapy then Immunotherapy. 

    Xx


  11. Wow Bridget!

    I had no idea! Your doing great and seem very in control despite everything you've had thrown at you ❤️️

    I went to Asda with my mum and my youngest son tonight and when were in the queue my mum had to go sit down, she said it was a panic attack - you know, heart racing, feeling confined almost like an outer body experience!!

    I was about to go into meltdown too as before this I was the one who worried and panic'd and she was as cool as a cucumber. 

    I dont think I've been as mentally drained as what I have these 4 weeks. Xx

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