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Curt

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  1. Like
    Curt reacted to LUNGevityKristin in FDA Approves Tecentriq Plus Chemotherapy for Initial NSCLC Treatment   
    From the article, “We are pleased to offer this Tecentriq-based combination as a new treatment option that can provide a clinically meaningful survival benefit for people with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer,” said Levi Garraway, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. 'Today’s approval offers another opportunity to help prolong the lives of people with this type of the disease'.”
    You can read the full story here:  https://www.gene.com/media/press-releases/14827/2019-12-03/fda-approves-genentechs-tecentriq-plus-c
  2. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in 8mm nodul with spiculated   
    Hi Medlaw, Occasionally  a small nodule can be removed by a wedge resection, which takes out only a part of the lobe.It depends in part on the locatiion of the nodule. If it's near the outer edge of the lobe, a wedge could be possible. Mine was too far inside. Removing it would have destroyed the blood circulation below it.
    I had a lower right lobectomy by VATS (video assisted). This requires only small incisions. It was a fairly easy surgery, as surgeries go. I was released from the hospital the following day. My activities were restricted for a couple of weeks, but I was able to get around and take care of myself. 
    My surgeon said that unless I was planning to run a marathon, I probably wouldn't notice a difference in my lung capacity and I don't. I do notice that my breathing sometimes sounds different on that side, but I can breath fine. I'm 74. My surgery was 3 years ago. My quality of life is good.
  3. Like
    Curt reacted to Troy2 in Accidentally discovered 17 x 10 nodule   
    The pulmonologist doesn't agree about the nodule being spiculated after the second CT scan (high res this time). The nodule has not changed in appearance or size. He is certain that it is benign. He thinks it is a granuloma that is probably related to a common infection in the area I grew up. I am scheduled for another CT in 9 months just to be certain. That will be followed with one in 12 months. 
    That is better news than I was expecting to hear.
  4. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in 8mm nodul with spiculated   
    Hi Medlaw and welcome. Yes, it's a small nodule. I couldn't venture a guess about whether it's malignant or not. Most nodules are not cancer. "Spiculated" is suspicious, warranting some followup. I don't know about "mildlly spiculated".  I suggest you consult with a pulmonologist and have him/her look at your CT (the actual CT film or whatever you call it, not just the radiologist report)  Pulmonologists can tell a lot from the appearance of a nodule. I wouldn't be surprised if they want to do another CT, one of your whole chest.
    My lung cancer was found "by accident'. I had a prior non-lung cancer and was having regular CT scans to watch for possible metastases. A  small nodule appeared in one of my CTs and I had to go back in 3 months  for another CT to see if it had grown. It had, slightly. From the appearance, the pulmonologist thought it didn't look like a metastasis, but that it could be a primary lung cancer, which it turned out to be. By the way, I'm a never-smoker too. 
    I had a lobectomy 3 years ago and didn't need further treatment, but I do have regular lung CTs now. Lung cancer found at an early stage is highly curable, usually by surgery  alone.  Early stage lung cancers rarely have any symptoms-- if found early it's usually by accident in a CT  for something else. So don't let your fear keep you from following up on your little nodule.  Either you'll be reassured that it's benign, or you'll be one of us "fortunate" ones who get an early diagnosis.
    Keep in touch here and let us know how it goes.
    Bridget O
  5. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Niess in What date do people use   
    @LisaA whichever damn date you want!   Congratulations on NED.  
  6. Like
    Curt reacted to Susanrae in Happy Thanksgiving to my LC Family   
    Happy Thanksgiving to all! 
    I don't know how I would have coped with my lung cancer diagnosis without having all of you and your words of encouragement, information and HOPE!!  Bless you, Susan Rae
  7. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Pattymac in Happy Thanksgiving!   
    I am thankful for my family, my positive recovery since surgery and this community.  
  8. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in Happy Thanksgiving!   
    Alive, NED and the pending Thanksgiving feast!
  9. Like
    Curt reacted to Rower Michelle in Happy Thanksgiving!   
    I am thankful for the simple things in life: being able to walk, hug my hubby, and carry my lap cats around.  The best days are when I can do normal things.  
     
    I started my Integrative Wellness plan a year ago just after Thanksgiving, I’m grateful for my tribe that makes a high quality of life a reality not a possibility. (That includes you guys too!)
  10. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Happy Thanksgiving!   
    I'm thankful to be alive, to be NED on 3 primary cancers, and to have a good quality of life.
  11. Like
    Curt reacted to MarieE in Another newbie ... Still a bit in shock   
    Well, day one is done, and thankful for that. It was definitely stressful, not really knowing what to expect. We got there at 11 and didn't finish until 6 PM. I'm hoping we can join friends for Thanksgiving tomorrow but leaving everything flexible so we can play it by ear.
  12. Like
    Curt got a reaction from RondaBeaty in Subtle changes?   
    Hi @Blossomsmom   You’ve gotten something really good advice from others.   I’ve had the terrible experience of being the caregiver and the patient.   I recall the first time I got upset in front of my dad (the patient), about nine months after his diagnosis.  His response stunned me.  He was genuinely surprised that I was so upset.  All of us had done such a good job of being stoic for him that we left him feeling like it wasn’t as upsetting to us as it was to him.  We were all devastated but our putting on a brave face in front of him and falling apart out of sight left him feeling like it wasn’t as hard on us as it was.  Now being on the patient side I have the full perspective.  You know your mom best.  If she’s been the type of person in the past to want to discuss things then she probably wants to discuss this but avoids it to protect you.  I’d say if you have something you want your mom to know or want to know something from her ask.  Don’t push, but ask.  
     
    Regarding her change in demeanor that can be a lot do things.  She may not even be aware of the change.  The after wedding blues could be it. Her coming to terms with her own mortality can also be it.  I remember the day it happened for my dad, he had gotten sole very bad news in terms of prognosis .  There was a very different emotional change for him.  If your mom is not getting emotional support it may be a good idea to get it for her   A support group, psychiatrist, therapist or religious leader.  Talking helps and can energize someone.
    A cancer battle is a roller coaster physically and emotionally.  Your mom is incredibly lucky to have you.  Follow your instincts and don’t let things go unsaid if they are important to you or you think they are important to her.  It doesn’t have to be a before you die conversation.  Just a conversation about how you feel and give her the opportunity to tell you how she feels.  When I had those conversations with my dad I told him that I’d watched him deal with life’s challenges my whole life and that he was a role model for me.  I told him that how he was dealing with this and how he felt could help me deal with something similar in the future if I had to confront it.   Him helping me helped him, but it turns out it’s probably helped me more.   
  13. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Happy Thanksgiving to my LC Family   
    Happy Thanksgiving Lou.  
  14. Like
    Curt reacted to Rower Michelle in Happy Thanksgiving to my LC Family   
    Hi All, 
    Thank you Lou, for the warm holiday wishes.  I feel the same way, this is a very special place and I'm grateful for all of you.  Not sure how I would have made it through the last year without you all. 
    So I just can't help myself.... a little ditty to kick off the holiday week.....
     
  15. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in Happy Thanksgiving to my LC Family   
    Happy Thanksgiving Lou.  
  16. Like
    Curt reacted to LouT in Happy Thanksgiving to my LC Family   
    All,
    I hope it's okay to post this here.  I figured "General" was a good place to do it.  Having lung cancer this year was one of the worst things I've ever gone through.  When I came to this forum I was a hot mess; depressed, despondent, little hope for the future and scared to death.  So many of you were so wonderful to me.  I sometimes go back and read the original posts and feel the same comfort they gave me then.  You all helped to get me through this terrible time and on this Thanksgiving I am so thankful to be alive, NED, with my family and super thankful for finding all of you.  You gave me hope, strength, great advice and took me from helplessness to hope and recovery.  Thanks to all of you and while I'm not happy about having LC I sure am glad that I met all of you.
    Happy Thanksgiving,
    Lou
  17. Like
    Curt reacted to Philip Waisonovitz in new to this site   
    Thanks Curt for responding best of luck to you also
     
     
     
  18. Thanks
    Curt got a reaction from Jdf1217 in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Hello @Jdf1217  First off congratulations on the birth of your third child.  My wife and I have three boys; 11, 9 and 6.  Three is a game changer.  I am really sorry to hear about your diagnosis and what you are going through.  Finding out you have lung cancer, especially at a young age is very scary.  I was forty two when I was diagnosed last year.  I’m considered young, you are considered very young.  Ignore what you read online about prognosis.  Those numbers are for people who were diagnosed five years ago and for people of all ages and health.  They also don’t reflect all of the treatments that have become available in the last five years.  The fact that it is localized in one lung, that you are young and that you have so much to live for all  work in your favor. 
     
    Have they done a biopsy of the cancer yet?  Normally genetic testing on blood work is what is called germline genetic testing.  That testing determines if “you“ have any hereditary mutations that predispose you to lung cancer.  A biopsy of the cancer cells would allow them to do somatic genetic testing of the cancer itself to identify if “it” has any genetic mutations.  If there are any mutations your treatment can be tailored specially to them.  
     
    I know this is terrifying but it is confront able.  I’m glad you found this site. It’s been a great source of support for me.  I hope it also provides you with what you need during this time.  Hang in there.  
  19. Like
    Curt reacted to Niess in Subtle changes?   
    Hello Blossomsmom (forgive my other replies to your posts as I'm new to navigating this site). I agree with RondaBeaty. I'm fighting stage IV lung cancer and have also been a caregiver of my best friend, my mom. It's harder for the caregiver than the patient in so many ways. Your mom knows that and would probably love to help her daughter through a tuff time. Your mom needs to be needed just as you do by your grown babies. If you let her help you through your fears and anxiety it could possibly help her by focusing on something other than the overwhelming cancer elephant in the room. I can only hope the suggestion helps.
    Wishing you both well, prayers🌻
     
  20. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Jdf,
    Welcome here. Having said that, I'm sure you would rather be enjoying your life and children than worrying about lung cancer. So, let's start with some questions. You said stage IV adenocarcinoma but report only one location of a tumor--the left lung. Are there tumors in the lung and in the pleural space between the lung and interior chest wall? Because you are diagnosed so young, there is a chance your adenocarcinoma might display biomarkers that point to a targeted therapy as a potential treatment. To confirm, a special laboratory performed tissue biopsy (not blood test) analysis is required. Your diagnosis resulted from a fluid biopsy. Has your doctor suggested a tissue biopsy to screen for targeted therapy as a possible treatment?
    Stage IV adenocarcinoma outcomes have really improved in the last 10 years. To explain the inaccuracy of "Dr. Google" survival statistics and reinforce Michelle's suggestion of Gould's essay, read here.  And here are some tips and tricks that might help as you go forward into treatment.
    In February, good Lord willing, I will have survived sixteen years after diagnosis with lung cancer. I had many surgeries, lots of infusion, and glow in the dark from radiation, but I'm here. That suggests that if I can live, so can you.
    Stay the course.
    Tom
  21. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Hi Jdf1217 and welcome. I'm sorry to hear about your diagnosis.  Curt has said what I would have said and said it better.!  Ignore Dr Google regarding prognosis. Be sure you've had a biopsy and somatic genetic testing (also called biomarker testing or tumor genetics).  Not all biopsies include this. Usually the pathologist looks at the cells under a microscope and reports on what he/she sees. The biomarker testing requires a tumor sample to be sent out to a specialty lab for additional testing. Biomarkers show what the best treatment for your cancer is likely to be.
    Hang in there and keep posting. Let us know what questions you have and how we can support you We're here for you.
    Bridget O
  22. Like
    Curt reacted to Rower Michelle in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Hi @Jdf1217
    I'm so sorry you have to be here.  We all know the devastation of receiving this diagnosis.  It's important to know that you are not alone.  We're a family here you can say anything without judgment.  Can you share what your proposed treatment plan is?  
    Curt is correct, Dr. Google is not our friend.  This essay by Stephen J. Gould shows why:  http://jonathantreasure.com/the-median-isnt-the-message-stephen-jay-gould/ My doctor gave me this to read and it was a game changer for me. 
    I saw a webinar recently with the Head of the Canadian Health Service Oncology- in it she said that 100 years ago lung cancer was a very rare disease but it was considered a woman's disease that occurred during pregnancy and menopause.  The Canadian researchers are studying this to determine why young women are at risk for lung cancer.  
    Diagnosis is not prognosis!  Please look at this blog by Emily Bennett Taylor, she's a young women diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer and BEAT IT:  https://embenkickscancer.wordpress.com  The key to her success was willing to push conventional oncology and not take NO for an answer.  She found a surgeon at Memorial Sloan Kettering to perform a life saving procedure.   
    Lung cancer is complex and while most treatment plans today are very straightforward, having access to a top notch medical team is absolutely critical.  You may want to contact the GO2Foundation or LUNGevity's help line to ensure you are matched with an expert.   
    There is hope.  Hang on as this is a wild ride.  We'll be here for you through all of it. 
    Michelle 
     
  23. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Rower Michelle in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Hello @Jdf1217  First off congratulations on the birth of your third child.  My wife and I have three boys; 11, 9 and 6.  Three is a game changer.  I am really sorry to hear about your diagnosis and what you are going through.  Finding out you have lung cancer, especially at a young age is very scary.  I was forty two when I was diagnosed last year.  I’m considered young, you are considered very young.  Ignore what you read online about prognosis.  Those numbers are for people who were diagnosed five years ago and for people of all ages and health.  They also don’t reflect all of the treatments that have become available in the last five years.  The fact that it is localized in one lung, that you are young and that you have so much to live for all  work in your favor. 
     
    Have they done a biopsy of the cancer yet?  Normally genetic testing on blood work is what is called germline genetic testing.  That testing determines if “you“ have any hereditary mutations that predispose you to lung cancer.  A biopsy of the cancer cells would allow them to do somatic genetic testing of the cancer itself to identify if “it” has any genetic mutations.  If there are any mutations your treatment can be tailored specially to them.  
     
    I know this is terrifying but it is confront able.  I’m glad you found this site. It’s been a great source of support for me.  I hope it also provides you with what you need during this time.  Hang in there.  
  24. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in Recently diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma   
    Hello @Jdf1217  First off congratulations on the birth of your third child.  My wife and I have three boys; 11, 9 and 6.  Three is a game changer.  I am really sorry to hear about your diagnosis and what you are going through.  Finding out you have lung cancer, especially at a young age is very scary.  I was forty two when I was diagnosed last year.  I’m considered young, you are considered very young.  Ignore what you read online about prognosis.  Those numbers are for people who were diagnosed five years ago and for people of all ages and health.  They also don’t reflect all of the treatments that have become available in the last five years.  The fact that it is localized in one lung, that you are young and that you have so much to live for all  work in your favor. 
     
    Have they done a biopsy of the cancer yet?  Normally genetic testing on blood work is what is called germline genetic testing.  That testing determines if “you“ have any hereditary mutations that predispose you to lung cancer.  A biopsy of the cancer cells would allow them to do somatic genetic testing of the cancer itself to identify if “it” has any genetic mutations.  If there are any mutations your treatment can be tailored specially to them.  
     
    I know this is terrifying but it is confront able.  I’m glad you found this site. It’s been a great source of support for me.  I hope it also provides you with what you need during this time.  Hang in there.  
  25. Like
    Curt reacted to LisaA in What date do people use   
    Thank you all for your replies. I really just need something that is finally positive in my life since it has been a long, long year.    So I am using tomorrow, 11/24 as my date since that was the date of detection. 
    So a happy 1 year cancer survivor dinner and toast will occur tomorrow.  I wish good health and healing to all on this board. Thank you for being here for me whenever I have needed answers. I'm grateful that I am not alone. 🧡
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