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Curt

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  1. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Irka in Surgery recovery going well, but auto accident sets me back   
    Uber and Lyft for rides.  I long for the day I don’t have to own a car anymore. I’m glad you are on the mend Irka.  
  2. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Roz in Post op   
    Hi Kinsbourgh.  I had a right upper lobe lobectomy on February 26.  It was done via VATS.  They get you up and walking in the hospital the day of or the day after.  The big milestone is getting your chest tube removed.  That provided a lot of relief for me and was when I was allowed to go home.  One thing I learned the hard way is to keep up with your pain medication.  I felt pretty good after my surgery and let my pain medication wear off without saying anything to the nurses.  Turns out I was feeling pretty good because the pain medication works.  It took a little while to get the pain back under control.  The nurses were not happy with me.  Mine was removed and I was discharged from the hospital after three days.  Once home I spent three or four days going from my bed to an arm chair next to my bed.  I found that a wedge pillow was helpful while I was in bed and that carrying a small pillow under my arm was helpful with keeping my arm off my incisions on my right side.  It also helped to squeeze it when I had to cough, sneeze or hiccup.  All three of those hurt, coughing is good for recuperation though.  I walked a lot before and after surgery.  I used the spirometer breathing device a lot as well.  It was a week before I stopped pain meds and just used Tylenol, two weeks before I was up and moving around, three before I went back to work for a few hours a day and four before going back full time.  Fatigue was a big thing for me.  I was really surprised with how tired I was.  I’d never felt that level of fatigue before.  I had a lump/tickle in my throat that made me cough for a few months.  I thought it would never go away but it did.  Ricola helped while I had it.  I do still have some muscular pain in my right chest when I cough, but it’s not bad and aim sure it will go away.  Generally I had visions of being handicapped by this surgery.  Always being out of breath and not being able to do the things I’d done before.  It takes a while but I’ve gotten back to it all.  I coach my kids baseball teams, play sports with them, swim laps in the pool, run, bike all without issues.  My lung capacity is back to where it was prior to surgery.  It is a slow recovery, takes time and some effort but you do recover.  What I imagined and the reality were very different.  It is not as bad as you are imagining.  If you work at it you will recover and be back doing the things you do now within a few months, unless you run marathons.  You may not run any marathons for a while.  Hang in there.  You’ll get through it.  Post any questions or concerns here.  
  3. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Susanrae in Surgery recovery going well, but auto accident sets me back   
    Uber and Lyft for rides.  I long for the day I don’t have to own a car anymore. I’m glad you are on the mend Irka.  
  4. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Moonbeam in No Inherited Mutations?   
    I’ll include him in my prayers as well.  
  5. Like
    Curt reacted to MBinOregon in No Inherited Mutations?   
    Hey Curt,
    I have no cancer on either side of my family (the blood related ones, not the in-law kind), but I have a genetic mutation.  I was told this is an "acquired" mutation, not something I was born with.  I'm also a never smoker, so how on earth did I acquire this mutation?  No one knows, but I'm told my mutation is very common among female, non-smoker, young-ish people, so apparently it's trendy for folks like me, so I must've figured, oh yes, I'll take it! 😉😜
    Enjoy your weekend!
    MB
  6. Like
    Curt reacted to Moonbeam in No Inherited Mutations?   
    Curt - my husband doesn’t have any genetic mutations as well. He’s just had a metastatic recurrence and I have requested, which they were going to do, his new samples from his latest bronchoscopy/EBUS procedure re-tested. I’ve been doing a lot of research on course of action with no genetic mutations and there are some immunotherapy drugs out there that hopefully he will respond to. That is our new prayer! 
  7. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in Surgery recovery going well, but auto accident sets me back   
    Irka,
    One step forward and two back is at least movement and movement is life. Keep on moving. Driving is overrated with nightmarish traffic.
    Stay the course.
    Tom
  8. Like
    Curt reacted to LouT in Post op   
    Kinsborough,
    Welcome to the forum.  Sorry you need to be here, but glad you found us.  My situation is not too different from Curt's (including not taking my pain meds, so be vigilant and take them as prescribed).  In my case I had a lobectomy (VAT's) of the lower-right lung on May 2nd of this year.  Well, it's almost three months now and I am back to doing 5 miles/day on my treadmill along with a pretty good weight workout afterward.  I do notice some changes, but I had already been diagnosed with mild COPD (Gold, Level A, which indicates small impact and little chance of worsening) so I do sometimes feel a difference, but that seems to be diminishing over time.  I will say that for the first 5-6 weeks I had times when I needed to lay down and take a nap or just rest after doing anything strenuous.  I don't feel that need anymore and the most lingering thing I have is areas around my rib cage where I have numbness, occasional burning feeling, pain and/or some combination of the three.  My doctor had already told me to expect some of that and that it would take extra time (up to months) for all of that to go away.  Otherwise I feel very good.  I go for my first follow up scan in August (fingers crossed) and then a scan every six months for the first two years.  If no recurrence then it will move to an annual scan. 
    Hang in there and you may be surprised that the surgery is not as terrible as you expect it to be (that was my case).  Take your time recovering and stay as active as you can without overdoing it.  
    Let us know how it goes once you are able and I'll keep you in my prayers.
  9. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Irka in Surgery's over!   
    All things considered those are good results Irka.  I’m glad you’re home and on the mend.  You are only a week out.  Pain is normal that soon after.  I’m convinced that anyone saying any different doesn’t remember that clearly.  I do!   It will start to get better.  I was on narcotic pain meds afterwards.  I was able to wean off them during the day after about a week but I needed them at night when sleeping for about two weeks.  If you are ok with narcotic pain meds (higher risk of addiction) you can ask for them.  They will help.  
  10. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Post op   
    hi Kinsbrough,  Curt and Deb have given you some very good information. My experience was not too different. I had VATS lower right lobectomy in November 2016. My surgeon told me that I probably wouldn't notice a difference in my abilities, unless I was planning to run a marathon, which I wasn't. He was right. 
    I was released from the hospital the day after my surgery with the chest tube in place. It seems like  hospitals have different policies- it used to be that they would always keep you in until the tube came out. My tube was in for 10 days because of an ongoing air leak. I did fine at home. I was able to walk around the neighborhood with the tube and its bag and valve covered by a big raincoat. The tube was uncomfortable and could be really painful if I moved the wrong way. I was relieved to have it out and I didn't need any opiate pain meds after i was out.
    One thing I would recommend is that you get a wedge pillow-- Sleeping with your upper body elevated makes it easier to breath after surgery. I tried at first propping myself up with regular pillows but ended up with a stiff neck. The wedge pillow solved the problem. I got mine from a store that sells medical devices, but you can also find them online.
    As surgeries go, the VATs lobectomy is fairly easy. I wish you all the best. Let us know if you have any specific questions.
    Bridget O.
  11. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in Post op   
    Hi Kinsbourgh.  I had a right upper lobe lobectomy on February 26.  It was done via VATS.  They get you up and walking in the hospital the day of or the day after.  The big milestone is getting your chest tube removed.  That provided a lot of relief for me and was when I was allowed to go home.  One thing I learned the hard way is to keep up with your pain medication.  I felt pretty good after my surgery and let my pain medication wear off without saying anything to the nurses.  Turns out I was feeling pretty good because the pain medication works.  It took a little while to get the pain back under control.  The nurses were not happy with me.  Mine was removed and I was discharged from the hospital after three days.  Once home I spent three or four days going from my bed to an arm chair next to my bed.  I found that a wedge pillow was helpful while I was in bed and that carrying a small pillow under my arm was helpful with keeping my arm off my incisions on my right side.  It also helped to squeeze it when I had to cough, sneeze or hiccup.  All three of those hurt, coughing is good for recuperation though.  I walked a lot before and after surgery.  I used the spirometer breathing device a lot as well.  It was a week before I stopped pain meds and just used Tylenol, two weeks before I was up and moving around, three before I went back to work for a few hours a day and four before going back full time.  Fatigue was a big thing for me.  I was really surprised with how tired I was.  I’d never felt that level of fatigue before.  I had a lump/tickle in my throat that made me cough for a few months.  I thought it would never go away but it did.  Ricola helped while I had it.  I do still have some muscular pain in my right chest when I cough, but it’s not bad and aim sure it will go away.  Generally I had visions of being handicapped by this surgery.  Always being out of breath and not being able to do the things I’d done before.  It takes a while but I’ve gotten back to it all.  I coach my kids baseball teams, play sports with them, swim laps in the pool, run, bike all without issues.  My lung capacity is back to where it was prior to surgery.  It is a slow recovery, takes time and some effort but you do recover.  What I imagined and the reality were very different.  It is not as bad as you are imagining.  If you work at it you will recover and be back doing the things you do now within a few months, unless you run marathons.  You may not run any marathons for a while.  Hang in there.  You’ll get through it.  Post any questions or concerns here.  
  12. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Deb W in Post op   
    Hi Kinsbourgh.  I had a right upper lobe lobectomy on February 26.  It was done via VATS.  They get you up and walking in the hospital the day of or the day after.  The big milestone is getting your chest tube removed.  That provided a lot of relief for me and was when I was allowed to go home.  One thing I learned the hard way is to keep up with your pain medication.  I felt pretty good after my surgery and let my pain medication wear off without saying anything to the nurses.  Turns out I was feeling pretty good because the pain medication works.  It took a little while to get the pain back under control.  The nurses were not happy with me.  Mine was removed and I was discharged from the hospital after three days.  Once home I spent three or four days going from my bed to an arm chair next to my bed.  I found that a wedge pillow was helpful while I was in bed and that carrying a small pillow under my arm was helpful with keeping my arm off my incisions on my right side.  It also helped to squeeze it when I had to cough, sneeze or hiccup.  All three of those hurt, coughing is good for recuperation though.  I walked a lot before and after surgery.  I used the spirometer breathing device a lot as well.  It was a week before I stopped pain meds and just used Tylenol, two weeks before I was up and moving around, three before I went back to work for a few hours a day and four before going back full time.  Fatigue was a big thing for me.  I was really surprised with how tired I was.  I’d never felt that level of fatigue before.  I had a lump/tickle in my throat that made me cough for a few months.  I thought it would never go away but it did.  Ricola helped while I had it.  I do still have some muscular pain in my right chest when I cough, but it’s not bad and aim sure it will go away.  Generally I had visions of being handicapped by this surgery.  Always being out of breath and not being able to do the things I’d done before.  It takes a while but I’ve gotten back to it all.  I coach my kids baseball teams, play sports with them, swim laps in the pool, run, bike all without issues.  My lung capacity is back to where it was prior to surgery.  It is a slow recovery, takes time and some effort but you do recover.  What I imagined and the reality were very different.  It is not as bad as you are imagining.  If you work at it you will recover and be back doing the things you do now within a few months, unless you run marathons.  You may not run any marathons for a while.  Hang in there.  You’ll get through it.  Post any questions or concerns here.  
  13. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Post op   
    Hi Kinsbourgh.  I had a right upper lobe lobectomy on February 26.  It was done via VATS.  They get you up and walking in the hospital the day of or the day after.  The big milestone is getting your chest tube removed.  That provided a lot of relief for me and was when I was allowed to go home.  One thing I learned the hard way is to keep up with your pain medication.  I felt pretty good after my surgery and let my pain medication wear off without saying anything to the nurses.  Turns out I was feeling pretty good because the pain medication works.  It took a little while to get the pain back under control.  The nurses were not happy with me.  Mine was removed and I was discharged from the hospital after three days.  Once home I spent three or four days going from my bed to an arm chair next to my bed.  I found that a wedge pillow was helpful while I was in bed and that carrying a small pillow under my arm was helpful with keeping my arm off my incisions on my right side.  It also helped to squeeze it when I had to cough, sneeze or hiccup.  All three of those hurt, coughing is good for recuperation though.  I walked a lot before and after surgery.  I used the spirometer breathing device a lot as well.  It was a week before I stopped pain meds and just used Tylenol, two weeks before I was up and moving around, three before I went back to work for a few hours a day and four before going back full time.  Fatigue was a big thing for me.  I was really surprised with how tired I was.  I’d never felt that level of fatigue before.  I had a lump/tickle in my throat that made me cough for a few months.  I thought it would never go away but it did.  Ricola helped while I had it.  I do still have some muscular pain in my right chest when I cough, but it’s not bad and aim sure it will go away.  Generally I had visions of being handicapped by this surgery.  Always being out of breath and not being able to do the things I’d done before.  It takes a while but I’ve gotten back to it all.  I coach my kids baseball teams, play sports with them, swim laps in the pool, run, bike all without issues.  My lung capacity is back to where it was prior to surgery.  It is a slow recovery, takes time and some effort but you do recover.  What I imagined and the reality were very different.  It is not as bad as you are imagining.  If you work at it you will recover and be back doing the things you do now within a few months, unless you run marathons.  You may not run any marathons for a while.  Hang in there.  You’ll get through it.  Post any questions or concerns here.  
  14. Like
    Curt reacted to Deb W in Post op   
    Hi Kinsbourg,
    I had an upper left lobectomy March 22.  I had VATS robotic surgery.   I went for short walks the first week home and gradually increased them.  I started playing tennis again in June and play a couple of matches a week now combined with other exercise on alternate days.  After surgery, I never thought it would be possible to do all the things I did before.  The doctors told me I would, but I didn't really believe them!  Managing energy is still a challenge for me at times.  I can never seem to tell in the moment when I've overdone it and then I pay the consequences of feeling extremely fatigued later.  I am getting to know my limits a  little better as time goes by.  Wishing you all the best on your upcoming surgery.
  15. Like
    Curt reacted to Claudia in Diagnosis by surprise   
    That's exactly what I have heard. Long rehab but totally worth it. I can't wait. LOL
  16. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Claudia in Diagnosis by surprise   
    Joint replacement surgery isn’t easy  the results are amazing for anyone I know who’s had it.
  17. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Claudia in Diagnosis by surprise   
    That is amazing progress Claudia.  I was really afraid of going under anesthesia as well.  They know what they are doing and are hyper cautious about who they will put under and who they won’t.  You’ll do great.  Is the shoulder replacement related to the cancer?   
  18. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Claudia in Diagnosis by surprise   
    Hi Claudia.  The, “there is a spot on your lung” is scary and shocking.  Mine was found peripherally on an abdominal scan for something else.  We watched it for a year with no change.  I opted to have it removed just in case.  It turned out to be Stage 1A Adenocarcinoma NSCLC.  I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.  You mentioned finding the 3cm mass by accident.  Did you have any additional testing for a diagnosis?   
  19. Like
    Curt reacted to Terri L in Cancer trial   
    I am on Keytruda/Pemetrexed/carboplatin.  Only one treatment so far.  21 days between each for a total of 4.  I felt tremendous after the treatment and had zero side effects.  Without saying the words, he indicated it was a hail mary mixture, as I showed up for help in end stages.  Other than my cough(which has been cut in half)  and getting tired pretty easy, I'm doing fine.  As a matter of fact, he told me to walk daily now.  Before I needed help to get to the ladies room.  I won't be medically cured, but between prayer and attitude, I see life as worth pursuing again.  In my opinion, we just keep trying new things until they run out of new things.  My doctor said new trials are coming to market all the time, and each person is different.   
  20. Like
    Curt reacted to Claudia in How to starve cancer   
    Thank you for your response Tom. I, too, am skeptical of all "miracle cures". I just thought I would ask here to see if anyone had anything to say. I always appreciate your posts.
    Claudia
  21. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in How to starve cancer   
    Claudia, 
    I’ve not read the book you mention but many like it. I’m very pleased to learn you are consulting with your physician before you try any of the “curative” diet suggestions. 
    During treatment, my problem was consuming calories because chemo really affected my tastebuds. I also wonder at the top level how it is possible to starve cancer without starving the body. 
    I am unusually sensitive about people who publish the “I have a cure” book because a close friend believed, denied conventional treatment, and died well before his time.
    Stay the course.
    Tom 
  22. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Nancy Ann in Power washing   
    Four months out from a right upper lobe lobectomy and I’m happy to report that power washing the patio in 80 degree weather is NO problem.  I would never have guessed that when I first learned I was going to have surgery. I was sure I’d be wheezing and short of breath the rest of my life.  I’m happy to report that life’s mundane chores are still possible...and less mundane now.  My wife’s even happier to report it.  I may need to learn to play this lobectomy thing up a bit more.  
     
     
     
  23. Like
    Curt got a reaction from JillW in Power washing   
    Four months out from a right upper lobe lobectomy and I’m happy to report that power washing the patio in 80 degree weather is NO problem.  I would never have guessed that when I first learned I was going to have surgery. I was sure I’d be wheezing and short of breath the rest of my life.  I’m happy to report that life’s mundane chores are still possible...and less mundane now.  My wife’s even happier to report it.  I may need to learn to play this lobectomy thing up a bit more.  
     
     
     
  24. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Susan Cornett in Hoping for a false alarm....   
    Every ache and pain comes along with another level of concern now.  The up side is those little things in life that felt like big concerns no longer do.  Lots of perspective with this journey.  
    Good luck with the scans and enjoy that pedicure.  It sounds way more important than the rest.  
  25. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Claudia in Hoping for a false alarm....   
    Every ache and pain comes along with another level of concern now.  The up side is those little things in life that felt like big concerns no longer do.  Lots of perspective with this journey.  
    Good luck with the scans and enjoy that pedicure.  It sounds way more important than the rest.  
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