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Curt

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  1. Like
    Curt got a reaction from G.A.M. in Tick-tock, tick-tock.   
    This phase of diagnosis is definitely all consuming.  Things do settle in once a clear path and treatment plan are formed.   There are plenty of variables to consider when evaluating both those options.  If you have specific questions on either ask away.   There are plenty of us here who have been through one or both.   
  2. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Kate7617 in Kate7617   
    @Kate7617 my father battled cancer and now I have.   I’ve told this story here before.  When my dad was sick I was always trying to be strong around him.  I didn’t want him to know I was upset so it wouldn’t upset him.  I thought that was helping him.  I’d hold it all in until I left his house or hospital room and then fall apart.  Eventually I fell apart in front of him and he was genuinely surprised.  He told me that he didn’t think anyone was that upset.   I had to tell him that we were all devastated but wanted to be strong from him.  After that exchange I looked for ways to share my concern and hurt with him in ways that let him know I cared but didn’t put the burden of my devastation on him.   I’m sure I didn’t balance it well, but I did the best I can.   
     
    Fast forward to my own diagnosis, what I have found is that after the explosion that comes from diagnosis and initial treatments is the world kind of returns to where it was.   People get back to their lives and the world keeps moving.   It was upsetting to see that while my world was still in such turmoil.   I’d ask myself how can everyone else’s world keep going while mine feels like it’s falling apart?  I still struggle with it sometimes.  Other times I appreciate the fact that the word is continuing for the people I care about and I remember that just because I didn’t show my dad how upset I was didn’t mean I wasn’t.  It just meant I was trying to maintain a sense of “normalcy” for his sake.  
  3. Like
    Curt reacted to Steff in Kate7617   
    Kate,
    I am sorry you are feeling that you have no support from your family.  DFK and Curt have some really good points.  As a caregiver and very caring person, I have often found myself at a loss for words when dealing with my mom's cancer journey.  Some of it is due to being overwhelmed, other times it's from pure exhaustion.  The reality is that lots of folks don't deal with other people's pain/suffering/negative feelings/etc very well.  Perhaps your daughter-in-laws are included in this group.  But no matter how supportive or unsupportive a person is, those of us on the "outside" of lung cancer have a hard time figuring out the best way to help.  Most of us need to be told what to do and how to help.  Have you done that? Have you been specific in telling people what your needs are?  While with your family, are you acting like all is okay even though it might not be? If so, your family might be taking this cue from you and acting as if all is okay too.  Asking for help or telling your daughter-in-laws what you need from them does not mean they will be "fake" if/when they change their behavior.  Perhaps all they needed was to be told what their role is in your battle.  
    I hope you are able to get the support you want from somewhere, whether it is from your family, friends, a support group, or here.  
    Take Care,
    Steff
  4. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Opal in Kate7617   
    @Kate7617 my father battled cancer and now I have.   I’ve told this story here before.  When my dad was sick I was always trying to be strong around him.  I didn’t want him to know I was upset so it wouldn’t upset him.  I thought that was helping him.  I’d hold it all in until I left his house or hospital room and then fall apart.  Eventually I fell apart in front of him and he was genuinely surprised.  He told me that he didn’t think anyone was that upset.   I had to tell him that we were all devastated but wanted to be strong from him.  After that exchange I looked for ways to share my concern and hurt with him in ways that let him know I cared but didn’t put the burden of my devastation on him.   I’m sure I didn’t balance it well, but I did the best I can.   
     
    Fast forward to my own diagnosis, what I have found is that after the explosion that comes from diagnosis and initial treatments is the world kind of returns to where it was.   People get back to their lives and the world keeps moving.   It was upsetting to see that while my world was still in such turmoil.   I’d ask myself how can everyone else’s world keep going while mine feels like it’s falling apart?  I still struggle with it sometimes.  Other times I appreciate the fact that the word is continuing for the people I care about and I remember that just because I didn’t show my dad how upset I was didn’t mean I wasn’t.  It just meant I was trying to maintain a sense of “normalcy” for his sake.  
  5. Like
    Curt reacted to DFK in Kate7617   
    Happy New Year Kate,
    Good to hear from you and to get an update of where you're at. I can truly appreciate your concerns of no treatment with still a "trace" of cancer, however, chemo/radiation has been a good standard of care for years before Durvalumab or targeted therapy came along. My girlfriends dad is 7 years NED after receiving only the chemo and radiation combo, Stage 3b inoperable. He is an inspiration for hope and prayers. 
    Although it's nice to have family and friends inquire about our health and show initiative to assist in some of our needs, whether physical or emotional, sometimes the harsh reality is that not everyone can be empathetic or feel comfortable talking about the big "C". It appears that having a cancer diagnosis not only asks of us to deal with all the medical treatments and all that that entails but it also asks that we dig deep within to find our own core of strength to help us through the dark nights of the soul. This is especially true for those of us who may not have a primary caregiver and partner/spouse. 
    I find it difficult NOT to get philosophical about our journey with cancer, about setting our priorities and values in order and making my life meaningful.
    I'll keep you in my prayers. Take care, DFK
     
  6. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Deb W in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  7. Like
    Curt reacted to Roz in Happy New Year   
    Let's all strive for a new year with improved health and more cancer research that will benefit all of us!!
     
    Best,
    Ro
  8. Like
    Curt reacted to Lisa66 in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Good for you!!! May this year be the best for you and your family.
    Prayers
    Lisa
  9. Like
    Curt reacted to Donna G in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Curt, celebrating the new year having fun and with your loving family ---
    that begins a Happy New Year .  Thanks for sharing.
    I pray your New Year continues just like that. 
    Donna G
  10. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Curt,
    We’ll said and well done!
    Stay the course. 

    Tom
  11. Like
    Curt reacted to Rower Michelle in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Rock on Curt!!  Happy New Year! 
  12. Like
    Curt reacted to Lisa L in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Good job Curt...Happy New Year ❤️
  13. Like
    Curt reacted to St Michael in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    Congrats and happy New Years!
  14. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Mally in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  15. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LUNGevityKristin in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  16. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Lisa66 in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  17. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Steff in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  18. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in Happy New Year   
    For survivors and caregivers: may this New Year bring all no evidence of disease! 
    Stay the course. 
    Tom
  19. Like
    Curt got a reaction from TJM in Am I doing a right thing? I am new this forum   
    @Ted I was in the exact situation last year.  I went into surgery not knowing and came out with Stage 1 Lung cancer.  If it wasn’t cancer they would only have taken a wedge with no change in lung capacity.  Since it was cancer they removed the entire lobe.  I have not required any follow up treatment.  My lung capacity is back to normal.  I have a little bit of numbness.  Surgery is the gold standard for treatment.  It does feel barbaric to do it without knowing for sure but I did and I’m glad I did.  
  20. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Happy New Year - 308 Days Post Lobectomy   
    It’s been 308 days since I had an upper right lobe lobectomy.   I’m spending this New Years Eve with my wife and three sons (7, 9 and 11) at an indoor water park.  Walking the stairs probably isn’t like it would have been last year but I’m able to do it and here to enjoy it.   I’ll add making it easier to climb stairs to the list of resolutions (I’ve got a few).   Another year in the books.  I hope 2020 is a little healthier, a littler easier and a lot happier for everyone here.  ❤️🌟💫💪🏼🥊💥🥂
  21. Like
    Curt got a reaction from G.A.M. in Hermit   
    Welcome @G.A.M.   I’m sorry to hear about your diagnosis and your other difficulties.  You’ve come to the right place for support.  AlL of us are here for the same reason, to give and to get.
    Surgery is an affective treatment but it comes with its risks and recovery challenges.  That is why they are focused on the lung function tests.   The uncertainty during the diagnosis phase and treatment planning is stressful.  We are here to listen.  
     
    Hang in there.  
  22. Like
    Curt reacted to Lisa66 in New Member   
    Welcome Valerie. When you see hay y’all on my post you will know I am not from NJ Lol. I wish you all the luck on your treatment. You will find a lot of experienced, kind, and helpful people here.
    Prayers
    Lisa
  23. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Valerie Brown in CT scan results   
    Waiting for results is awful.  4mm is REALLY small though.  Is this the first nodule or have you had LC before?
  24. Like
    Curt reacted to Lisa L in New and concerned about PET suv   
    Hi Willa, I have a 9mm slightly spiculated nodule in left lung, caught by chance on ct last December.   I had a pet 3 weeks later with no Uptake.  I got a pulmonologist and did another ct in April and Aug. with no growth, so considered stable and next scan is end of feb.  now with that said how does this affect my mental state, at first I freaked out ever day and was a complete mess but after talking to my pulmonologist and the nodule staying stable I started just forgetting about it.  Fast forward today and last two weeks I have had pain in left chest like it’s sore so once again I’m completely freaked out yet I go back to what my pulmonologist said that I would never feel anything from a small nodule and I tried to calm down and think about what I’ve been doing differently and I realised I’ve increased my upper body workout and I’m just sore from that.  Our minds can play funny tricks on us.  I would see what next ct scan shows and if it has grown and since it did light up on the pet I would choose to have it removed, keep us updated and stay strong, the people on this forum are amazing.  Love and light ❤️
  25. Like
    Curt reacted to woco in Remaining positive and optimistic   
    I am now in my seventh month of treatments after diagnosis...just had my second CT Scan earlier this week.  Good news...no new growth or spreading and my tumor continues to shrink.  Sometimes I hope to hear the tumor is gone, but, for now, I remain optimistic and hopeful, realizing God is good, and prayers are powerful. 
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