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KatieB

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  1. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Noela in Tips and Support for Family Caregivers   
    Caregiving Support and Help
    Tips and Support for Family Caregivers
    Some of the people most prone to burnout are caregivers – people who devote themselves to the unpaid care of elderly, chronically ill, or disabled family members. The demands of caregiving can be overwhelming, especially if you feel you have little control over the situation or that you’re in over your head financially. Fatigue, frustration, and stress from caregiving can cause health problems, a strain on your other relationships, and eventually lead to the physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion that defines burnout.
    If you’re caring for a family member, it’s essential that you get the support you need before burnout occurs. The good news is that you’re not alone. There is help for caregivers available and ways for you to regain balance in your life.
    In This Article:
    Family caregivers: what you should know
    Signs of caregiver burnout
    Get the help you need
    Seek emotional support
    Taking care of yourself while caregiving
    Family caregivers: What you should know about burnout
    Providing care for a family member in need is a centuries-old act of kindness, love, and loyalty. And as life expectancies increase and medical treatments advance, more and more of us will participate in the caregiving process, either as the caregiver, the recipient of care, or possibly both.
    Unfortunately, caregiving can take a heavy toll if you don’t get adequate support. Caregiving involves many stressors: changes in the family dynamic, household disruption, financial pressure, and the sheer amount of work involved. The rewards of caregiving – if they come at all – are intangible and far off, and often there is no hope for a happy outcome.
    As the stress piles up, frustration and despair take hold and burnout becomes a very real danger. But you can prevent caregiver burnout by following a few essential guidelines:
    Learn as much as you can about your family member’s illness and about how to be a caregiver as you can. The more you know, the more effective you’ll be, and the better you’ll feel about your efforts.
    Know your limits. Be realistic about how much of your time and yourself you can give. Set clear limits, and communicate those limits to doctors, family members, and other people involved.
    Accept your feelings. Caregiving can trigger a host of difficult emotions, including anger, fear, resentment, guilt, helplessness, and grief. As long as you don’t compromise the well-being of the care receiver, allow yourself to feel what you feel.
    Confide in others. Talk to people about what you feel; don’t keep your emotions bottled up. Caregiver support groups are invaluable, but trusted friends and family members can help too. You may also benefit from seeing a therapist or counselor.
    10 Tips for Family Caregivers
    Caregiving is a job and respite is your earned right. Reward yourself with respite breaks often.
    Watch out for signs of depression, and don’t delay in getting professional help when you need it.
    When people offer to help, accept the offer and suggest specific things that they can do.
    Educate yourself about your loved one’s condition and how to communicate effectively with doctors.
    There’s a difference between caring and doing. Be open to technologies and ideas that promote your loved one’s independence.
    Trust your instincts. Most of the time they’ll lead you in the right direction.
    Caregivers often do a lot of lifting, pushing, and pulling. Be good to your back.
    Grieve for your losses, and then allow yourself to dream new dreams.
    Seek support from other caregivers. There is great strength in knowing you are not alone.
    Stand up for your rights as a caregiver and a citizen.
    Source: National Family Caregiver's Association
    Warning signs of caregiver burnout
    Once you burn out, caregiving is no longer a healthy option for either you or the person you’re caring for. So it’s important to watch for the warning signs of caregiver burnout and take action right away when you recognize the problem.
    Common warning signs of caregiver burnout:
    You have much less energy than you used to
    It seems like you catch every cold or flu that’s going around
    You’re constantly exhausted, even after sleeping or taking a break
    You neglect your own needs, either because you’re too busy or you don’t care anymore
    Your life revolves around caregiving, but it gives you little satisfaction
    You have trouble relaxing, even when help is available
    You’re increasingly impatient and irritable with the person you’re caring for
    You feel overwhelmed, helpless, and hopeless
    Preventing caregiver burnout tip 1: Get the help you need
    Find caregiver services in your area
    Explore the Family Caregiver Alliance’s Family Care Navigator, a state-by-state resource intended to help you locate services for family caregivers and resources for older or disabled adults.
    The first strategy for preventing caregiver burnout is: Don’t try to do it all alone. Taking on all of the responsibilities of caregiving without regular breaks or assistance is a surefire recipe for burnout.
    Ask for help when you need it. Enlist friends and family who live near you to run errands, bring a hot meal, or “baby-sit” the care receiver so you can take a well-deserved break.
    Also, there are services to help caregivers in most communities, and the cost is often based on ability to pay or covered by the care receiver’s insurance. Services that may be available in your community include adult day care centers, home health aides, home-delivered meals, respite care, transportation services, and skilled nursing.
    Caregiver services in your community – Call your local senior center, senior services organization, county information and referral service, university gerontology department, family service, or hospital social work unit for contact suggestions.
    In the U.S. call your local Area Agency on Aging.
    Caregiver support for veterans – If your care recipient is a Veteran in the U.S., home health care coverage, financial support, nursing home care, and adult day care benefits may be available. Some Veterans Administration programs are free, while others require co-payments, depending upon the veteran’s status, income, and other criteria.
    Your family member’s affiliations – Fraternal organizations such as the Elks, Eagles, or Moose lodges may offer some assistance if your family member is a longtime dues-paying member. This help may take the form of phone check-ins, home visits, or transportation.
    Community transportation services – Many community transportation services are free for your care recipient, while others may have a nominal fee or ask for a donation. In the U.S., your local Area Agency on Aging can help you locate transportation to and from adult day care, senior centers, shopping malls, and doctor's appointments.
    Telephone check-ins – Telephone reassurance provides prescheduled calls to homebound older adults to reduce their isolation and monitor their well-being. Check with local religious groups, senior centers, and other public or nonprofit organizations.
    adult day care – If your loved one is well enough, consider the possibility of adult day care. An adult day care center can provide you with needed breaks during the day or week, and your loved one with some valuable diversions and activities.
    Preventing caregiver burnout tip 2:
    Seek emotional support
    Pablo Casals, the world-renowned cellist, said, “The capacity to care is the thing that gives life its deepest significance and meaning.” Although caregivers are often isolated from others, it’s essential that you receive the emotional support you need, so you don’t lose that capacity.
    Share what you’re going through with at least one other person. Turn to a trusted friend or family member, join a support group, or make an appointment with a counselor or therapist. You can also draw strength from your faith. A congregation in a church or synagogue can provide the encouragement you need to feel good about your caregiving role, and may also be able to provide a break from time to time.
    The value of caregiver support groups
    A caregiver support group is a great way to share your troubles and find people who are going through the same experiences that you are living each day. If you can't leave the house, many Internet services are also available.
    In most support groups, you'll talk about your problems and listen to others talk; you'll not only get help, but you'll also be able to help others. Most important, you'll find out that you're not alone. You’ll feel better knowing that other people are in the same situation, and their knowledge can be invaluable, especially if they’re caring for someone with the same illness as you are.
    Types of Caregiver Support Groups
    Community support groups for caregivers:
    People live near each other and meet in a given place each week or month.
    You get face-to-face contact and a chance to make new friends who live near you.
    The meetings get you out of the house, get you moving provide a social outlet, and reduce feelings of isolation.
    Meetings are at a set time. You will need to attend them regularly to get the full benefit of the group.
    Since the people in the support group are from your area, they'll be more familiar with local resources and issues.
    Internet support groups for caregivers:
    People are from all over the world and have similar interests or problems.
    You meet online, through email lists, websites, message boards, or social media.
    You can get support without leaving your house, which is good for people with limited mobility or transportation problems.
    You can access the group whenever it's convenient for you or when you need help most.
    If your problem is very unusual – a rare disease, for example – there may not be enough people for a local group, but there will always be enough people online.
    To find a community support group, check the yellow pages, ask your doctor or hospital, or call a local organization that deals with the health problem you would like to address in a support group. To find an Internet support group, visit the website of an organization dedicated to the problem.
    Preventing caregiver burnout tip 2: Take care of yourself
    When you are a caregiver, finding time to nurture yourself might seem impossible. But you owe it to yourself to find the time. Without it, you may not have the mental or physical strength to deal with all of the stress you experience as a caregiver. Give yourself permission to rest and to do things that you enjoy on a daily basis. You will be a better caregiver for it.
    Tips for taking care of yourself:
    Incorporate activities that give you pleasure even when you don't really feel like it. Listen to music, work in the garden, engage in a hobby…whatever it is that you enjoy.
    Pamper yourself. Take a warm bath and light candles. Find some time for a manicure or a massage.
    Eat balanced meals to nurture your body. Find time to exercise even if it's a short walk every day. Do the best you can to sleep at least 7 hours a night.
    Laughter really is the best medicine. Buy a light-hearted book or watch a comedy. Whenever you can, try to find some humor in everyday situations.
    Keep a journal. Write down your thoughts and feelings. This helps provide perspective on your situation and serves as an important release for your emotions.
    Arrange telephone contact with a family member, a friend, or a volunteer from a church or senior center so that someone calls each day to be sure everything is all right. This person can help by contacting other family members with status updates or to let them know if you need anything.
    Try to set a time for afternoons or evenings out. Seek out friends and family to help you so that you can have some time away from the home. If it is difficult to leave, invite friends and family over to visit with you. Share some tea or coffee. It is important that you interact with others.
    http://helpguide.org/elder/caring_for_caregivers.htm
  2. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from GramaA in How to Navigate the Cost of Chemotherapy   
    Orig article here: https://www.healthline.com/health/cancer/chemotherapy-cost#takeaway 
    Chemotherapy, or chemo, is a form of drug therapy that destroys fast-spreading cancer cells. It’s used to treat cancer and reduce symptoms like pain.
    If you have a cancer diagnosis, your doctor might recommend chemo on its own or with other treatments. In either case, you’ll likely have a lot of questions, including how much chemotherapy will cost.
    Understandably, navigating these costs can be overwhelming. Any feelings you have are valid.
    It may help to learn about chemotherapy expenses before you begin treatment. This way, you can get a better idea of what to expect.
    In this article, we’ll explore the factors that can affect the cost of chemotherapy. We’ll also provide tips for managing the costs with or without health insurance.
    Average chemotherapy cost
    The cost of chemotherapy varies greatly.
    A major factor is health insurance. Generally, if you have health insurance, you can expect to pay 10 to 15 percent of chemo costs out of pocket, according to CostHelper.com.
    If you don’t have health insurance, you might pay between $10,000 to $200,000 or more.
    The total price of chemotherapy also depends on:
    Type of cancer. The type of cancer will determine what kind of chemo treatment you need.
    Stage of disease. Typically, treating early stage cancer costs less than advanced stage cancers.
    Number of treatments. The more doses you need, the more chemo will cost.
    Duration of treatment. The length of your treatment plan is also a factor.
    Type of chemotherapy. Chemo can be taken by mouth or intravenously. It can also be injected into the skin, artery, or tumor.
    Treatment setting. Depending on the type of chemo, you may receive it at home or in a clinic, office, or hospital.
    Geographic location. Chemotherapy costs are usually higher in areas with high living costs.
    Side effects. If you experience side effects due to chemotherapy, you may need additional treatment. This can increase the overall cost of chemo.
    How to pay for chemotherapy
    Most health insurance providers help cover cancer treatment. However, every insurance plan is different. The best way to know what your plan includes is to speak with your insurance provider.
    Insurance
    Health insurance may cover the following aspects of cancer treatment:
    Office visits
    One of the main components of cancer treatment is frequent checkups with specialists. This includes specialists like oncologists.
    In most cases, insurance providers partially cover the expense of each visit. You’ll be required to pay the remaining fee.
    Depending on your plan, the fee might be a dollar amount (co-pay) or percentage (co-insurance). Your copay or coinsurance might be listed on your health insurance card.
    Laboratory tests
    Your doctor might perform laboratory tests, like blood or urine tests, as part of cancer treatment.
    Typically, the fees for these tests are billed directly from the laboratory. Your insurance provider may cover part or all these costs.
    Imaging tests
    The group of healthcare professionals managing your care might use imaging tests to monitor your progress. This includes tests like:
    X-rays
    MRIs
    CT scans
    These tests might be partially covered by health insurance.
    Procedures and treatment
    There are several types of cancer treatment:
    Surgery. Your insurance may provide partial coverage. If your surgeon is not in-network, your insurance plan might not cover the procedure.
    Radiation. Similarly, your insurance provider might partially cover radiation treatments.
    Drug therapy. Your provider might also help pay for drug therapy, including chemotherapy. Usually, intravenous (IV) drugs are covered under your medical plan, while pills are covered by a separate pharmacy plan.
    Also, if you have to stay in the hospital, you might have to pay a fee per hospital admission or day.
    Medicare
    Medicare covers chemotherapy, plus other cancer treatments, according to Medicare.gov. Medicare Part A covers costs related to a hospital inpatient stay. Medicare Part B provides coverage for treatment in outpatient settings, like an office or clinic.
    Financial assistance
    If you don’t have health insurance, the following foundations can provide financial help:
    Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition
    Patient Access Network Foundation
    Patient Advocate Foundation
    ADVERTISING
    HEALTHLINE EVENT
    There is hope ahead
    Watch Lesley Stahl, Alyssa Milano, D.L. Hughley & more as they recount the past year and look ahead to the future. Watch our insightful and uplifting conversation on hope, vaccines, mental health & more.
    WATCH NOW
    Managing chemotherapy cost
    Consider these tips to help ease the stress of managing chemo costs:
    Choose in-network providers. When possible, visit in-network providers. Your health insurance may not cover visits out-of-network.
    Plan for out-of-network visits. If you prefer or need out-of-network care, call your insurance provider first to determine if these services can be covered.
    Get a full list of treatment needs. Ask your healthcare team for a list of proposed treatments. Call your insurance provider to see what’s covered.
    Call pharmacies in advance. If you’re taking drugs for side effects, shop around and call different pharmacies to find the best price.
    Explore alternatives. Ask your doctor if there are substitutions for your treatments that insurance is more likely to cover.
    Check if you need pre-approval. Some treatments need to be pre-approved or precertified by your health insurance. If you start them without pre-approval, you might need to pay the full cost.
    Check coverage for emergency care. Ask your provider what forms of emergency care they cover. This way, you’ll have an idea of what to expect if you need emergency services.
    Pay your health insurance premiums. Though it may be difficult to pay monthly fees, it’s important to avoid a lapse in health insurance. Paying your monthly premiums on time will ensure you always have insurance.
    Keep track of bills. Ask a trusted relative or friend to organize your bills, receipts, and insurance claims. This will help you manage money and resolve any future issues.
    Work with a counselor. A social worker or hospital financial counselor can help establish special payment plans with your treatment center.
    Seek financial assistance. Foundations like Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition, Patient Access Network Foundation,and Patient Advocate Foundation offer financial help for cancer treatment costs.
    Support programs for coping with chemotherapy cost
    Coping with cancer can be difficult, but you don’t need to do it alone. There are many programs that provide support and care for people with cancer. These groups can connect you to other individuals with similar experiences.
    You may be able to find cancer support groups at your local hospital or online. You can also search for programs in your area on the following websites:
    American Cancer Society
    CancerCare
    Friend for Life
    Cancer Support Community
    Takeaway
    The exact cost of chemotherapy is different for each person. It depends on many factors, including the stage of your disease, number of treatments, and the form of chemotherapy. In most cases, health insurance will partially cover these expenses.
    If you have questions, don’t hesitate to contact your healthcare team and insurance provider. The more you communicate your concerns and needs, the easier it will be to navigate the costs.
    If you need financial help, consider working with a hospital financial counselor or financial assistance programs.
    Last medically reviewed on April 1, 2021
  3. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from TJM in How to Navigate the Cost of Chemotherapy   
    Orig article here: https://www.healthline.com/health/cancer/chemotherapy-cost#takeaway 
    Chemotherapy, or chemo, is a form of drug therapy that destroys fast-spreading cancer cells. It’s used to treat cancer and reduce symptoms like pain.
    If you have a cancer diagnosis, your doctor might recommend chemo on its own or with other treatments. In either case, you’ll likely have a lot of questions, including how much chemotherapy will cost.
    Understandably, navigating these costs can be overwhelming. Any feelings you have are valid.
    It may help to learn about chemotherapy expenses before you begin treatment. This way, you can get a better idea of what to expect.
    In this article, we’ll explore the factors that can affect the cost of chemotherapy. We’ll also provide tips for managing the costs with or without health insurance.
    Average chemotherapy cost
    The cost of chemotherapy varies greatly.
    A major factor is health insurance. Generally, if you have health insurance, you can expect to pay 10 to 15 percent of chemo costs out of pocket, according to CostHelper.com.
    If you don’t have health insurance, you might pay between $10,000 to $200,000 or more.
    The total price of chemotherapy also depends on:
    Type of cancer. The type of cancer will determine what kind of chemo treatment you need.
    Stage of disease. Typically, treating early stage cancer costs less than advanced stage cancers.
    Number of treatments. The more doses you need, the more chemo will cost.
    Duration of treatment. The length of your treatment plan is also a factor.
    Type of chemotherapy. Chemo can be taken by mouth or intravenously. It can also be injected into the skin, artery, or tumor.
    Treatment setting. Depending on the type of chemo, you may receive it at home or in a clinic, office, or hospital.
    Geographic location. Chemotherapy costs are usually higher in areas with high living costs.
    Side effects. If you experience side effects due to chemotherapy, you may need additional treatment. This can increase the overall cost of chemo.
    How to pay for chemotherapy
    Most health insurance providers help cover cancer treatment. However, every insurance plan is different. The best way to know what your plan includes is to speak with your insurance provider.
    Insurance
    Health insurance may cover the following aspects of cancer treatment:
    Office visits
    One of the main components of cancer treatment is frequent checkups with specialists. This includes specialists like oncologists.
    In most cases, insurance providers partially cover the expense of each visit. You’ll be required to pay the remaining fee.
    Depending on your plan, the fee might be a dollar amount (co-pay) or percentage (co-insurance). Your copay or coinsurance might be listed on your health insurance card.
    Laboratory tests
    Your doctor might perform laboratory tests, like blood or urine tests, as part of cancer treatment.
    Typically, the fees for these tests are billed directly from the laboratory. Your insurance provider may cover part or all these costs.
    Imaging tests
    The group of healthcare professionals managing your care might use imaging tests to monitor your progress. This includes tests like:
    X-rays
    MRIs
    CT scans
    These tests might be partially covered by health insurance.
    Procedures and treatment
    There are several types of cancer treatment:
    Surgery. Your insurance may provide partial coverage. If your surgeon is not in-network, your insurance plan might not cover the procedure.
    Radiation. Similarly, your insurance provider might partially cover radiation treatments.
    Drug therapy. Your provider might also help pay for drug therapy, including chemotherapy. Usually, intravenous (IV) drugs are covered under your medical plan, while pills are covered by a separate pharmacy plan.
    Also, if you have to stay in the hospital, you might have to pay a fee per hospital admission or day.
    Medicare
    Medicare covers chemotherapy, plus other cancer treatments, according to Medicare.gov. Medicare Part A covers costs related to a hospital inpatient stay. Medicare Part B provides coverage for treatment in outpatient settings, like an office or clinic.
    Financial assistance
    If you don’t have health insurance, the following foundations can provide financial help:
    Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition
    Patient Access Network Foundation
    Patient Advocate Foundation
    ADVERTISING
    HEALTHLINE EVENT
    There is hope ahead
    Watch Lesley Stahl, Alyssa Milano, D.L. Hughley & more as they recount the past year and look ahead to the future. Watch our insightful and uplifting conversation on hope, vaccines, mental health & more.
    WATCH NOW
    Managing chemotherapy cost
    Consider these tips to help ease the stress of managing chemo costs:
    Choose in-network providers. When possible, visit in-network providers. Your health insurance may not cover visits out-of-network.
    Plan for out-of-network visits. If you prefer or need out-of-network care, call your insurance provider first to determine if these services can be covered.
    Get a full list of treatment needs. Ask your healthcare team for a list of proposed treatments. Call your insurance provider to see what’s covered.
    Call pharmacies in advance. If you’re taking drugs for side effects, shop around and call different pharmacies to find the best price.
    Explore alternatives. Ask your doctor if there are substitutions for your treatments that insurance is more likely to cover.
    Check if you need pre-approval. Some treatments need to be pre-approved or precertified by your health insurance. If you start them without pre-approval, you might need to pay the full cost.
    Check coverage for emergency care. Ask your provider what forms of emergency care they cover. This way, you’ll have an idea of what to expect if you need emergency services.
    Pay your health insurance premiums. Though it may be difficult to pay monthly fees, it’s important to avoid a lapse in health insurance. Paying your monthly premiums on time will ensure you always have insurance.
    Keep track of bills. Ask a trusted relative or friend to organize your bills, receipts, and insurance claims. This will help you manage money and resolve any future issues.
    Work with a counselor. A social worker or hospital financial counselor can help establish special payment plans with your treatment center.
    Seek financial assistance. Foundations like Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition, Patient Access Network Foundation,and Patient Advocate Foundation offer financial help for cancer treatment costs.
    Support programs for coping with chemotherapy cost
    Coping with cancer can be difficult, but you don’t need to do it alone. There are many programs that provide support and care for people with cancer. These groups can connect you to other individuals with similar experiences.
    You may be able to find cancer support groups at your local hospital or online. You can also search for programs in your area on the following websites:
    American Cancer Society
    CancerCare
    Friend for Life
    Cancer Support Community
    Takeaway
    The exact cost of chemotherapy is different for each person. It depends on many factors, including the stage of your disease, number of treatments, and the form of chemotherapy. In most cases, health insurance will partially cover these expenses.
    If you have questions, don’t hesitate to contact your healthcare team and insurance provider. The more you communicate your concerns and needs, the easier it will be to navigate the costs.
    If you need financial help, consider working with a hospital financial counselor or financial assistance programs.
    Last medically reviewed on April 1, 2021
  4. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Judy M2 in How to Navigate the Cost of Chemotherapy   
    Orig article here: https://www.healthline.com/health/cancer/chemotherapy-cost#takeaway 
    Chemotherapy, or chemo, is a form of drug therapy that destroys fast-spreading cancer cells. It’s used to treat cancer and reduce symptoms like pain.
    If you have a cancer diagnosis, your doctor might recommend chemo on its own or with other treatments. In either case, you’ll likely have a lot of questions, including how much chemotherapy will cost.
    Understandably, navigating these costs can be overwhelming. Any feelings you have are valid.
    It may help to learn about chemotherapy expenses before you begin treatment. This way, you can get a better idea of what to expect.
    In this article, we’ll explore the factors that can affect the cost of chemotherapy. We’ll also provide tips for managing the costs with or without health insurance.
    Average chemotherapy cost
    The cost of chemotherapy varies greatly.
    A major factor is health insurance. Generally, if you have health insurance, you can expect to pay 10 to 15 percent of chemo costs out of pocket, according to CostHelper.com.
    If you don’t have health insurance, you might pay between $10,000 to $200,000 or more.
    The total price of chemotherapy also depends on:
    Type of cancer. The type of cancer will determine what kind of chemo treatment you need.
    Stage of disease. Typically, treating early stage cancer costs less than advanced stage cancers.
    Number of treatments. The more doses you need, the more chemo will cost.
    Duration of treatment. The length of your treatment plan is also a factor.
    Type of chemotherapy. Chemo can be taken by mouth or intravenously. It can also be injected into the skin, artery, or tumor.
    Treatment setting. Depending on the type of chemo, you may receive it at home or in a clinic, office, or hospital.
    Geographic location. Chemotherapy costs are usually higher in areas with high living costs.
    Side effects. If you experience side effects due to chemotherapy, you may need additional treatment. This can increase the overall cost of chemo.
    How to pay for chemotherapy
    Most health insurance providers help cover cancer treatment. However, every insurance plan is different. The best way to know what your plan includes is to speak with your insurance provider.
    Insurance
    Health insurance may cover the following aspects of cancer treatment:
    Office visits
    One of the main components of cancer treatment is frequent checkups with specialists. This includes specialists like oncologists.
    In most cases, insurance providers partially cover the expense of each visit. You’ll be required to pay the remaining fee.
    Depending on your plan, the fee might be a dollar amount (co-pay) or percentage (co-insurance). Your copay or coinsurance might be listed on your health insurance card.
    Laboratory tests
    Your doctor might perform laboratory tests, like blood or urine tests, as part of cancer treatment.
    Typically, the fees for these tests are billed directly from the laboratory. Your insurance provider may cover part or all these costs.
    Imaging tests
    The group of healthcare professionals managing your care might use imaging tests to monitor your progress. This includes tests like:
    X-rays
    MRIs
    CT scans
    These tests might be partially covered by health insurance.
    Procedures and treatment
    There are several types of cancer treatment:
    Surgery. Your insurance may provide partial coverage. If your surgeon is not in-network, your insurance plan might not cover the procedure.
    Radiation. Similarly, your insurance provider might partially cover radiation treatments.
    Drug therapy. Your provider might also help pay for drug therapy, including chemotherapy. Usually, intravenous (IV) drugs are covered under your medical plan, while pills are covered by a separate pharmacy plan.
    Also, if you have to stay in the hospital, you might have to pay a fee per hospital admission or day.
    Medicare
    Medicare covers chemotherapy, plus other cancer treatments, according to Medicare.gov. Medicare Part A covers costs related to a hospital inpatient stay. Medicare Part B provides coverage for treatment in outpatient settings, like an office or clinic.
    Financial assistance
    If you don’t have health insurance, the following foundations can provide financial help:
    Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition
    Patient Access Network Foundation
    Patient Advocate Foundation
    ADVERTISING
    HEALTHLINE EVENT
    There is hope ahead
    Watch Lesley Stahl, Alyssa Milano, D.L. Hughley & more as they recount the past year and look ahead to the future. Watch our insightful and uplifting conversation on hope, vaccines, mental health & more.
    WATCH NOW
    Managing chemotherapy cost
    Consider these tips to help ease the stress of managing chemo costs:
    Choose in-network providers. When possible, visit in-network providers. Your health insurance may not cover visits out-of-network.
    Plan for out-of-network visits. If you prefer or need out-of-network care, call your insurance provider first to determine if these services can be covered.
    Get a full list of treatment needs. Ask your healthcare team for a list of proposed treatments. Call your insurance provider to see what’s covered.
    Call pharmacies in advance. If you’re taking drugs for side effects, shop around and call different pharmacies to find the best price.
    Explore alternatives. Ask your doctor if there are substitutions for your treatments that insurance is more likely to cover.
    Check if you need pre-approval. Some treatments need to be pre-approved or precertified by your health insurance. If you start them without pre-approval, you might need to pay the full cost.
    Check coverage for emergency care. Ask your provider what forms of emergency care they cover. This way, you’ll have an idea of what to expect if you need emergency services.
    Pay your health insurance premiums. Though it may be difficult to pay monthly fees, it’s important to avoid a lapse in health insurance. Paying your monthly premiums on time will ensure you always have insurance.
    Keep track of bills. Ask a trusted relative or friend to organize your bills, receipts, and insurance claims. This will help you manage money and resolve any future issues.
    Work with a counselor. A social worker or hospital financial counselor can help establish special payment plans with your treatment center.
    Seek financial assistance. Foundations like Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition, Patient Access Network Foundation,and Patient Advocate Foundation offer financial help for cancer treatment costs.
    Support programs for coping with chemotherapy cost
    Coping with cancer can be difficult, but you don’t need to do it alone. There are many programs that provide support and care for people with cancer. These groups can connect you to other individuals with similar experiences.
    You may be able to find cancer support groups at your local hospital or online. You can also search for programs in your area on the following websites:
    American Cancer Society
    CancerCare
    Friend for Life
    Cancer Support Community
    Takeaway
    The exact cost of chemotherapy is different for each person. It depends on many factors, including the stage of your disease, number of treatments, and the form of chemotherapy. In most cases, health insurance will partially cover these expenses.
    If you have questions, don’t hesitate to contact your healthcare team and insurance provider. The more you communicate your concerns and needs, the easier it will be to navigate the costs.
    If you need financial help, consider working with a hospital financial counselor or financial assistance programs.
    Last medically reviewed on April 1, 2021
  5. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from LouT in Increased shortness of breath   
    Definitely let the oncologist know.  Immunotherapy may have a cumulative effect or it may be completely unrelated.  He may order a scan just to be certain and that would give you some peace of mind- not to mention address that side effect. 
    Wishing your mom the best.
    Please keep us posted! 
     
  6. Thanks
    KatieB got a reaction from TJM in Love the new law..   
    GREAT news! 
     
  7. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Saturn_Bound in Increased shortness of breath   
    Definitely let the oncologist know.  Immunotherapy may have a cumulative effect or it may be completely unrelated.  He may order a scan just to be certain and that would give you some peace of mind- not to mention address that side effect. 
    Wishing your mom the best.
    Please keep us posted! 
     
  8. Like
    KatieB reacted to LUNGevityHunter in The Denver chapter of Golfers Against Cancer...   
    “The Denver chapter of Golfers Against Cancer in February named University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center researchers Matthew Sikora, PhD, Jamie Studts, PhD, and Jenna Sopfe, MD, as the beneficiaries of three $50,000 grants for cancer research and clinical trials.” https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/uoca-gac031521.php?fbclid=IwAR2Wh0tQvHUAJQuDOocLTVoWYCyk9pI7iKGRetsPMpEPi9MdgBQ1RnmirKE#.YFI0vnEH_uA.facebook  
  9. Like
    KatieB reacted to LUNGevityHunter in liquid biopsies...   
    “Used with CT screening, liquid biopsies can help oncologists determine whether to move forward with more invasive procedures.” https://chicagohealthonline.com/liquid-biopsies-may-help-identify-lung-cancer/
  10. Like
    KatieB reacted to TJM in Love the new law..   
    Oncologist confirmation. NED!
  11. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Judy M2 in New Drug Therapies for EGFR   
    HI,
    Please see the information attached on two new trials to discuss with your doctor -
     
    Mariposa_PAG Clinical Trial_09Feb21.pdf PapIllon_PAG Clinical Trial 09Feb21.pdf
  12. Like
    KatieB reacted to Tom Galli in From Hope to Cure!   
    This is my first-string lung cancer team (on the left, Heather, RN, on the right Dr. H, MD, Hematologist and Oncologist). These two people have battled my lung cancer from diagnosis in February 2004 to today, more than seventeen years of intense engagement. Three things happened today: I was pronounced NED, Dr. H said CURE, and I was issued a new oncologist. My physician is retiring after 40 years of clinical practice.
    Of course I'm ecstatic! I'm over-the-moon. I'm eternally grateful for my team's skills, persistence, and tenaciousness. So this is it. I've gone from hope to CURE, and if I can do it, so can you!
    Stay the course.
    Tom
    PS--we all had two COVID vaccines and believed it worth unmasking to photograph this auspicious event.
     
     

  13. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from LouT in Pet Scan OK   
    This is an individual choice that I would prefer we not debate here on our forums intended to support each other. 
    LUNGevity sits on calls with the FDA as well as the DOD regarding lung cancer research and over the last year we also discussed, in quite detail, covid19 virus. We've had many updates during the year leading up to and after the FDA fast track of these vaccines .  I've had both my shots without any hesitation. 
    You do what's right for you.
    If you have questions about the covid19 vaccines and lung cancer, please visit https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/covid-19-and-lung-cancer where every answer is science-based and credible.
    Thanks everyone.
     
  14. Like
    KatieB reacted to LexieCat in Confession   
    Hey, nothing wrong with publicizing anything on the forums (other than private messages without permission of the sender). We are a public forum. Anyone who wants to wander in here and post (or read) can. That's one reason we discourage people from posting personal info like addresses, phone numbers, personal email addresses, etc. There are bad guys who would exploit that information.
    But what is posted on the public forums is readily accessible to all, and if you think it will help somebody, absolutely nothing wrong with posting a link (as long as the other site doesn't have a rule against it).
     
  15. Like
    KatieB reacted to TJM in Confession   
    😶. I need to confess something. I went on Reddit and perused the lung cancer subreddit. There were so many posts that go unresponded to it was killing me. First I posted about Lungevity and highly recommended people check it out. Did not seem to get much responses. Several posts were regarding surgery and had all of the usual questions. I got one response requesting I post the link to Lou's checklist.
    I'm not very smart phone literate but decided to see what was possible. Before I knew it, I figured it out and sent it as requested. After more pondering I posted it as a single post so more people could more easily see it. It has been up voted numerous times and we have got one new member from it (Matt).
    Did I do a bad thing? I can delete it. I just feel strange doing it with out Lou's permission.
    Sighh
    Peace
    Tom
  16. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Sandy N in Communicating with your healthcare team   
    Learning you have cancer is often frightening and overwhelming.

    Talking and listening to your doctor, nurse, and other members of your health care team- even family- becomes difficult. Studies show that clear communication between you and yoru health care team can help you feel better about your choices, and may even improve your quality of care.

    Questions to ask aobut your diagnosis:

    * What type of lung cancer do I have?
    * What stage is my lung cancer, and has it spread to other parts of my body?
    * What symptoms of lung cancer might I experience?
    * Where can I find more information about lung cancer?
    * Are there support groups or organizations available for my family and me?
    *Has my tumor been tested for genetic mutations?  Which tumor mutations do I have?

    Questions to ask about your treatment:

    * What are my goals for treatment? (is it to cure the cancer, control the cancer, or relieve symptoms?)
    * What treatment options are available for me?
    * Which treatment do you recommend, and why?
    *Am I a candidate for target treatment?
    * Should I/where do I get a second opinion?
    * Are there treatment options I should consider if chemotherapy isn't appropriate or has stopped working?
    * What are the risks and benefits of each treatment option?
    * What side effects might I experience and how can they be managed or prevented?
    * Where will I go to receive my treatments?
    * When can I start my treatment and how long will it last?
    * Which treatments are not covered by my insurance?
    * If insurance doesn't cover this treatment, what options exist to help with finances?
    * Are there any clinical trials that might be appropriate for me? Where can I go to get more information about clinical trials?


    Questions to ask your new doctor:

    * How much experience do you have in treating my specific type of lung cancer?
    * Are you board certified as an oncologist, thoracic surgeon or other?
    * How to you stay up to date on the latest lung cancer treatments?
    * Are you associated with a major medical center, medical school, or comprehensive cancer center?
    * Do you and the hospital accept my insurance?
    * Will I be able to receive all treatments at this facility?
    * Are cancer clinical trials offered at this facility?
    * Is there an oncology nurse or social worker who would be available during my treatment for education and support?
    * What other supportive services (support groups, housing, transportation, etc.) are available at this facility for patients and families?

    There are several things you can do to make communicating easier:

    * Make sure you understand what is being discussed. If you do not understand, ask for more detail or a non-technical explaination. If something seems confusing, try repeating it back to the doctor, for example, "you mean I should..."

    * For important appointments being a friend or a family member to help take notes, ask questions, and provide support. You can also ask if you may tape the conversation.

    * Ask to see x-rays or scans or have the doctor draw a diagram if you think pictures will help you understand something better.

    * Write down questions you may have as they come up, every day.
  17. Like
    KatieB reacted to valroberts728 in Anyone else have worsened depression, pain, or anxiety after immunotherapy?   
    My name is Valerie. I am 28 years old, and I was diagnosed with lung cancer at age 26. 
    I went through chemo no problem. I didn't even get nauseous, and my hair never fell out. The only bad symptoms I had was that it gave me terrible heartburn and fever like symptoms for a few days after.
    The results were stable. I was then put on Tagrisso. It wasn't bad either but I had occasional nausea. However, my tumors grew, so we switched to Tecentriq, an immunotherapy.
    Ever since I've been on immunotherapy, after treatment, my anxiety, pain, and depression increases for about a week and a half. Before immunotherapy, I had slight chronic anxiety and no depression, but I had pain issues.
    Now, a week and a half  after immunotherapy, I feel hopeless, and afraid. I have panic attacks 3-4 times a day, which requires medicine to relieve .I also need to take more painkillers, because the pain gets so intense.   Then I'm back to "normal" after that.
    Does this only happen to me or do you get this too? 
     
  18. Thanks
    KatieB got a reaction from Daria in If you are new- please read this to get started   
    If you’ve just joined LCSC:
    Introduce yourself in the Welcome New Members forum. Tell us a bit about yourself and your motivation for joining the community. If you are someone living with cancer, tell us as much as you’re comfortable sharing about your diagnosis and prognosis. Many of the other survivors who are members have been in similar situations. While no two journeys are the same, it can be very helpful to connect with someone who has been on a similar path. And you’ll find that an online support system can be very empowering and uplifting!
    Need more help to get started?  
    Here's a video:   https://recordings.join.me/G5fFttIRLkyALX1Ja82XQA 
    Or read this post
     
    To all lung cancer survivors and their families:
    We extend our insight and experience, as those who have walked this path before you, and we extend our support to you during this difficult journey.
    Here, you will find support, friendship, information and hope from other members who know and have experienced what it is you are going through.
    We know that this is a scary and uncertain time. We invite you to register as a member (it's free) and introduce yourselves.
    We come here for support and to support others. The members here understand- when it feels like no one in our "real" world does. We are a family.
    You ARE a survivor from the moment you are diagnosed. Your caregivers, families and friends who walk this journey with you are co-survivors.
    Welcome to LUNGevity's Lung Cancer Support Community online support network.
    Message me or any of our volunteer moderators if you have any questions or concerns.  
    We look forward to getting to know you!
     
  19. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Tom Galli in New KRAS Clinical Trials   
    Ph I/II trial evaluating our KRAS G12C inhibitor, MRTX 849 as monotherapy & in combination with other agents in NSCLC and other tumors.
    https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03785249 
     
    Sapphire study. Ph III comparing sitravatinib+nivolumab vs. docetaxel in NSCLC patients who progressed on prior PD-1/PD-L1 based therapy
    https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03906071 
  20. Thanks
    KatieB got a reaction from GaryG in New KRAS Clinical Trials   
    Ph I/II trial evaluating our KRAS G12C inhibitor, MRTX 849 as monotherapy & in combination with other agents in NSCLC and other tumors.
    https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03785249 
     
    Sapphire study. Ph III comparing sitravatinib+nivolumab vs. docetaxel in NSCLC patients who progressed on prior PD-1/PD-L1 based therapy
    https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03906071 
  21. Thanks
    KatieB got a reaction from Tbaker in Communicating with your healthcare team   
    Learning you have cancer is often frightening and overwhelming.

    Talking and listening to your doctor, nurse, and other members of your health care team- even family- becomes difficult. Studies show that clear communication between you and yoru health care team can help you feel better about your choices, and may even improve your quality of care.

    Questions to ask aobut your diagnosis:

    * What type of lung cancer do I have?
    * What stage is my lung cancer, and has it spread to other parts of my body?
    * What symptoms of lung cancer might I experience?
    * Where can I find more information about lung cancer?
    * Are there support groups or organizations available for my family and me?
    *Has my tumor been tested for genetic mutations?  Which tumor mutations do I have?

    Questions to ask about your treatment:

    * What are my goals for treatment? (is it to cure the cancer, control the cancer, or relieve symptoms?)
    * What treatment options are available for me?
    * Which treatment do you recommend, and why?
    *Am I a candidate for target treatment?
    * Should I/where do I get a second opinion?
    * Are there treatment options I should consider if chemotherapy isn't appropriate or has stopped working?
    * What are the risks and benefits of each treatment option?
    * What side effects might I experience and how can they be managed or prevented?
    * Where will I go to receive my treatments?
    * When can I start my treatment and how long will it last?
    * Which treatments are not covered by my insurance?
    * If insurance doesn't cover this treatment, what options exist to help with finances?
    * Are there any clinical trials that might be appropriate for me? Where can I go to get more information about clinical trials?


    Questions to ask your new doctor:

    * How much experience do you have in treating my specific type of lung cancer?
    * Are you board certified as an oncologist, thoracic surgeon or other?
    * How to you stay up to date on the latest lung cancer treatments?
    * Are you associated with a major medical center, medical school, or comprehensive cancer center?
    * Do you and the hospital accept my insurance?
    * Will I be able to receive all treatments at this facility?
    * Are cancer clinical trials offered at this facility?
    * Is there an oncology nurse or social worker who would be available during my treatment for education and support?
    * What other supportive services (support groups, housing, transportation, etc.) are available at this facility for patients and families?

    There are several things you can do to make communicating easier:

    * Make sure you understand what is being discussed. If you do not understand, ask for more detail or a non-technical explaination. If something seems confusing, try repeating it back to the doctor, for example, "you mean I should..."

    * For important appointments being a friend or a family member to help take notes, ask questions, and provide support. You can also ask if you may tape the conversation.

    * Ask to see x-rays or scans or have the doctor draw a diagram if you think pictures will help you understand something better.

    * Write down questions you may have as they come up, every day.
  22. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from jack14 in Do you need Supportive / Palliative Care?   
    Answer the following questions to determine whether palliative care might be right for you or someone close to you.
    Remember, you can receive palliative care at any point in your illness.
    https://getpalliativecare.org/rightforyou/ 
  23. Like
    KatieB got a reaction from Tom Galli in The VA Has Embraced Artificial Intelligence To Improve Veterans' Health Care   
    The VA Has Embraced Artificial Intelligence To Improve Veterans' Health Care
    https://www.scpr.org/news/2020/04/17/92010/the-va-has-embraced-artificial-intelligence-to-imp/
    Inside a laboratory at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Fla., machines are rapidly processing tubes of patients' body fluids and tissue samples. Pathologists examine those samples under microscopes to spot signs of cancer and other diseases.
    But distinguishing certain features about a cancer cell can be difficult, so Drs. Stephen Mastorides and Andrew Borkowski, decided to get a computer involved.
    In a series of experiments, they uploaded hundreds of images of slides containing lung and colon tissues into artificial intelligence software. Some of the tissues were healthy, while others had different types of cancer, including squamous cell and adenocarcinoma.
    Then they tested software with more images the computer had never seen before.
    "The module was able to put it together, and it was able to differentiate, 'Is it a cancer or is it not a cancer?'" Borkowski said. "And not only that, but it was also able to say what kind of cancer is it."
    The doctors were harnessing the power of what's known as machine learning. Software pre-trained with millions of images, like dogs and trees, can learn to distinguish new ones. Mastorides, chief of pathology and laboratory medicine services at the Tampa VA, said it took only minutes to teach the computer what cancerous tissue looks like.
    The two VA doctors recently published a study comparing how different AI programs performed when training computers to diagnose cancer.
    "Our earliest studies showed accuracies over 95 percent," Mastorides said.
    AI software was able to differentiate between benign colon tissue (left) and cancerous tissue (right). It was also able to determine the type of colon cancer. 
     
    Enhance, not replace
    The doctors said the technology could be especially useful in rural veterans clinics, where pathologists and other specialists aren't easily accessible, or in crowded VA emergency rooms, where being able to spot something like a brain hemorrhage faster could save more lives.
    Borkowski. the chief of the hospital's molecular diagnostics section, said he sees AI as a tool to help doctors work more efficiently, not to put them out of a job.
    "It won't replace the doctors, but the doctors who use AI will replace the doctors that don't," he said.
    The Tampa pathologists aren't the first to experiment with machine learning in this way. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved about 40 algorithms for medicine, including apps that predict blood sugar changes and help detect strokes in CT scans.
    The VA already uses AI in several ways, such as scanning medical records for signs of suicide risks. Now the agency is looking to expand research into the technology.
    The department announced the hiring of Gil Alterovitz as its first-ever Artificial Intelligence Director in July 2019 and launched The National Artificial Intelligence Institute in November. Alterovitz is a Harvard Medical School professor who co-wrote an artificial intelligence plan for the White House last year.
    He said the VA has a "unique opportunity to help veterans" with artificial intelligence.
    As the largest integrated health care system in the country, the VA has vast amounts of patient data, which is helpful when training AI software to recognize patterns and trends. Alterovitz said the health system generates about a billion medical images a year.
    He described a potential future where AI could help combine the efforts of various specialists to improve diagnoses.
    "So you might have one site where a pathologist is looking at slides, and then a radiologist is analyzing MRI and other scans that look at a different level of the body," he said.  "You could have an AI orchestrator putting together different pieces and making potential recommendations that teams of doctors can look at."
    Alterovitz is also looking for other uses to help VA staff members make better use of their time and help patients in areas where resources are limited.
    "Being able to cut the (clinician) workload down is one way to do that," he said. "Other ways are working on processes, so reducing patient wait times, analyzing paperwork, etc."
    Barriers to AI
    But Alterovitz notes there are challenges to implementing AI, including privacy concerns and trying to understand how and why AI systems make decisions.
    Last year, DeepMind Technologies, an AI firm owned by Google, used VA data to test a system to predict deadly kidney disease. But for every correct prediction, there were two false positives.
    Those false results may cause doctors to recommend inappropriate treatments, run unnecessary tests, or do other things that could harm patients, waste time, and reduce confidence in the technology.
    "It's important for AI systems to be tested in real-world environments with real-world patients and clinicians, because there can be unintended consequences," said Mildred Cho, the Associate Director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics.
    Cho also said it's important to test AI systems with a variety of demographics, because what may work for one population may not for another. The DeepMind study acknowledged that more than 90 percent of the patients in the dataset it used to test the system were male veterans, and that performance was lower for females.
    Alterovitz said the VA is taking those concerns into account as the agency experiments with AI and tries to improve upon the technology to ensure it is reliable and effective.
    This story was produced by the American Homefront Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Funding comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
  24. Like
    KatieB reacted to LUNGevityKristin in Friends Helping Friends   
    “I am overwhelmed by the kindness of my friends and acquaintances. Several times a day somebody texts or calls to see if I need any kind of groceries or errands run.” –Su, Maryland, Stage IV Metastatic Lung Cancer
  25. Like
    KatieB reacted to LUNGevityKristin in Oh, Brother!   
    Valerie Brown wanted to share this photo her daughter posted on social media this week!  Valerie says, "He’s my super special little guy who will always be Mom Mom’s # 1 little man 💕"
     
    Congrats to Valerie's family!

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