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NikoleV

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  1. Like
    NikoleV reacted to LUNGevityKristin in Live Your Best Life   
    "It’s been two and a half years since my stage IV lung cancer diagnosis. During that time there
    have been radiation treatments, a hospital stay, progression, my husband’s own cancer
    diagnosis, his surgeries, his chemo and radiation treatments and his own hospitalizations.
    But through it all there was always positivity. Early on I read the statement, “Don’t waste your
    cancer,” written by another lung cancer survivor. I tried to take this to heart, so while living in
    this new world of absolute and complete uncertainty, I focused on what I could control; making
    the most of every day. My goal became to celebrate everything, no matter how small. I started
    ending all of my social media posts with the hashtag #bestlife and sought to live by that motto.
    On a recent girl’s weekend, my friends surprised me with Best Life t-shirts in honor of my
    mantra. The shirt became my inspiration for my own BEST LIFE themed team shirt for an
    upcoming lung cancer walk. The shirts turned out so well, that we decided to sell them as a
    fundraiser. Shirt sales were better than expected, even as people began sheltering in place.
    New merchandise was added which is selling well too! The community really embraced the
    idea which led me to look into starting a non-profit based around the idea of living your best
    life.
    The recent forced isolation has allowed me to finish setting up this new non-profit called
    yEAHbestlife. Its purpose is to raise funds for lung cancer research, its mission is to encourage
    others to live their best life no matter your situation, because today is all that we really have.
    Cancer woke me up, but I believe that this idea speaks to everyone. Even during quarantine,
    people are sharing photos of themselves wearing our shirts living their best lives. In the
    darkness, there can be laughter, meaningful memories, and hope.
    In less than three months a team shirt has become its own non-profit, raising funds,
    awareness, and encouragement, urging everyone to make every day count. Even with a
    terminal diagnosis, I have found that laughter and enjoying life fosters healing.
    I refuse to 'waste my cancer'.”
    -Erika Arquilla Hlavacek
    @yEAHbestlife

  2. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from LaurenH in Royal Oak, MI - Lung Cancer Support Group, 3rd Monday of the Month   
    Gilda's Club Metro Detroit
    https://www.gildasclubdetroit.org/
    The Gilda’s Club Metro Detroit lung cancer support group meets on the 3rd Monday of each month from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at our Clubhouse. Our clubhouse is located at 3517 Rochester Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073. All support groups are completely free and are open to those diagnosed with lung cancer as well as their family and friends. Please call us for more information at (248)577-0800.
  3. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from Lisa66 in How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer / by Katie Brown   
    How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer
    June 11th, 2013 - by Katie Brown
    http://blog.lungevity.org/2013/06/11/ho ... ng-cancer/
    I’ve been thinking a lot about Lori Hope lately. In case you didn’t have the pleasure of knowing her IRL or online, here is a link that will give you a little more information about who Lori was.
    Lori was a lung cancer survivor who defied odds and outlived her prognosis. She was such an inspiration and source of hope to so many people in the cancer community. She was a rare soul. She was a cancer survivor who thought about others. I’ve known my share of cancer survivors who thought only of themselves. She often thought of those newly diagnosed and about their families. She wanted to leave this world a better place than when she was diagnosed and I admired her so much for how huge her heart was. Lori died September 2012 and is very missed by so many.
    Lori’s book. Help Me Live: 20 Things People With Cancer Want You To Know has been a reference for so many of us who support patients and families. A copy of that book sits on a shelf above my desk. I see it every day when I walk into my office.
    Today it’s inspired me to write my own list; a list specific to lung cancer.
    HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WITH LUNG CANCER
    Life’s financial burdens, family, children, employers and household chores don’t disappear when a lung cancer diagnosis happens. Navigating the medical process and surviving treatments and side effects are added to the mountain of responsibilities a person typically has.
    These are just 5 simple ways that you can help someone you care about who’s been diagnosed with lung cancer.
    1. Don’t ask if they smoked.
    Instead, show them that you care. Empathy and sympathy comes easier to those who’ve been diagnosed with other types of cancers. With lung cancer there are misconceptions about the disease and who can get it. Some people may believe that lung cancer is solely a preventable disease and don’t know that all you need to get lung cancer are lungs. There may be blame or even guilt associated with a lung cancer diagnosis. While lifestyle can play a part with any health issue, it isn’t your place to assess the cause of their lung cancer or place any blame upon them. When you learn of someone’s lung cancer diagnosis you need to decide whether or not you’re going to be a part of their supporting team.
    In one interview, Lori Hope mentioned how “OK” it was to say that a person’s diagnosis was “unfair”. Saying a diagnosis is unfair lets the patients know that you care; you understand that it could happen to anyone and that there is no blame placed upon the patient for their diagnosis.
    2. Listen.
    Listen to the patient. Some patients are blessed with family members and friends who will become caregivers and can support them throughout their lung cancer experience. Everyone wants to help and sometimes the wishes of the patient and even how they are feeling emotionally about their health and future can get lost in the day to day responsibilities. Don’t forget to include the patient in every aspect of decision making unless they defer all responsibility of that task to a specific person. Don’t forget to ask how the patient is doing and listen to the patient talk about how they are feeling about their situation. It’s ok not to know what to say or not have any answers. Just listen.
    Listen for the patient. Doctors’ appointments, treatments, procedures and life changes are overwhelming. It can be difficult emotionally to process all the things coming at you. Ask the patient to designate a healthcare advocate or “listener”. This person will go to doctor’s appointments, writes down questions and answers and records side effects and anything else the patient is experiencing and act as a liaison between the patient and their doctors.
    3. Share hopeful stories and experiences.
    Don’t talk about how you lost someone to cancer to someone who’s just been diagnosed with it. The idea is to inspire and offer encouragement, not instill fear or dread or even false hope. If you don’t have any real positive stories of people surviving cancer, find some survivor stories to share and talk about everything else. Your conversations needn’t revolve around cancer all of the time.
    4. Don’t ask. DO.
    “Let me know if I can help.” You’ve probably said these words many times in your lifetime in many different circumstances. Did you mean it then? Do you mean it now? There are so many things people can do to help, but the patient and their family will rarely ask for help. And saying those words simply puts the onus back onto the patient and off your shoulders.
    Actions speak louder than words. Set up a meal train or a chore chart among family and friends. Schedule a specific task and do it. Then do it again or do something else but keep helping as often as you can. A person diagnosed with lung cancer can use all the support and help you have to offer for the duration of their treatments and recovery. You’d want people to do the same for you.
    5. Seek outside support.
    If you don’t have time to spare to take on responsibilities and physically help the patient, there are still ways you can help. You can research to find outside resources to help support the patient and their family. You can find volunteer organizations who offer rides to treatments, you can contact churches and groups to mow lawns and do light housekeeping and deliver meals. You can even find cancer support groups and mentors/support buddies for the patient. Ask them what their needs are and work to help fulfill them. You can find a listing of resources on the LUNGevity Caregiver Resource Center.
  4. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from LaurenH in Join our support team!   
    Join our team!
    We are currently seeking survivors and caregivers to join our support team. If you have a few hours a week to provide support and friendship to others through email and/or phone, please sign up at the link below. 
    www.lungevity.org/lifeline

  5. Like
    NikoleV reacted to Jane Page in Needing support, my husband has stage 4 lung cancer   
    I would be very interested in signing up for that. I feel like I'm needing support 
  6. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from LaurenH in Needing support, my husband has stage 4 lung cancer   
    Hi Jane! LUNGevity has caregiver mentors that we can match you with for one on one support by email and/or phone. Would you like to be matched with someone through our LifeLine program? Please let me know if I can help find the support you are looking for.
    Best Regards, 
    Nikole
    www.lungevity.org/lifeline
  7. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from Tom Galli in Needing support, my husband has stage 4 lung cancer   
    Hi Jane! LUNGevity has caregiver mentors that we can match you with for one on one support by email and/or phone. Would you like to be matched with someone through our LifeLine program? Please let me know if I can help find the support you are looking for.
    Best Regards, 
    Nikole
    www.lungevity.org/lifeline
  8. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from Tom Galli in How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer / by Katie Brown   
    How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer
    June 11th, 2013 - by Katie Brown
    http://blog.lungevity.org/2013/06/11/ho ... ng-cancer/
    I’ve been thinking a lot about Lori Hope lately. In case you didn’t have the pleasure of knowing her IRL or online, here is a link that will give you a little more information about who Lori was.
    Lori was a lung cancer survivor who defied odds and outlived her prognosis. She was such an inspiration and source of hope to so many people in the cancer community. She was a rare soul. She was a cancer survivor who thought about others. I’ve known my share of cancer survivors who thought only of themselves. She often thought of those newly diagnosed and about their families. She wanted to leave this world a better place than when she was diagnosed and I admired her so much for how huge her heart was. Lori died September 2012 and is very missed by so many.
    Lori’s book. Help Me Live: 20 Things People With Cancer Want You To Know has been a reference for so many of us who support patients and families. A copy of that book sits on a shelf above my desk. I see it every day when I walk into my office.
    Today it’s inspired me to write my own list; a list specific to lung cancer.
    HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WITH LUNG CANCER
    Life’s financial burdens, family, children, employers and household chores don’t disappear when a lung cancer diagnosis happens. Navigating the medical process and surviving treatments and side effects are added to the mountain of responsibilities a person typically has.
    These are just 5 simple ways that you can help someone you care about who’s been diagnosed with lung cancer.
    1. Don’t ask if they smoked.
    Instead, show them that you care. Empathy and sympathy comes easier to those who’ve been diagnosed with other types of cancers. With lung cancer there are misconceptions about the disease and who can get it. Some people may believe that lung cancer is solely a preventable disease and don’t know that all you need to get lung cancer are lungs. There may be blame or even guilt associated with a lung cancer diagnosis. While lifestyle can play a part with any health issue, it isn’t your place to assess the cause of their lung cancer or place any blame upon them. When you learn of someone’s lung cancer diagnosis you need to decide whether or not you’re going to be a part of their supporting team.
    In one interview, Lori Hope mentioned how “OK” it was to say that a person’s diagnosis was “unfair”. Saying a diagnosis is unfair lets the patients know that you care; you understand that it could happen to anyone and that there is no blame placed upon the patient for their diagnosis.
    2. Listen.
    Listen to the patient. Some patients are blessed with family members and friends who will become caregivers and can support them throughout their lung cancer experience. Everyone wants to help and sometimes the wishes of the patient and even how they are feeling emotionally about their health and future can get lost in the day to day responsibilities. Don’t forget to include the patient in every aspect of decision making unless they defer all responsibility of that task to a specific person. Don’t forget to ask how the patient is doing and listen to the patient talk about how they are feeling about their situation. It’s ok not to know what to say or not have any answers. Just listen.
    Listen for the patient. Doctors’ appointments, treatments, procedures and life changes are overwhelming. It can be difficult emotionally to process all the things coming at you. Ask the patient to designate a healthcare advocate or “listener”. This person will go to doctor’s appointments, writes down questions and answers and records side effects and anything else the patient is experiencing and act as a liaison between the patient and their doctors.
    3. Share hopeful stories and experiences.
    Don’t talk about how you lost someone to cancer to someone who’s just been diagnosed with it. The idea is to inspire and offer encouragement, not instill fear or dread or even false hope. If you don’t have any real positive stories of people surviving cancer, find some survivor stories to share and talk about everything else. Your conversations needn’t revolve around cancer all of the time.
    4. Don’t ask. DO.
    “Let me know if I can help.” You’ve probably said these words many times in your lifetime in many different circumstances. Did you mean it then? Do you mean it now? There are so many things people can do to help, but the patient and their family will rarely ask for help. And saying those words simply puts the onus back onto the patient and off your shoulders.
    Actions speak louder than words. Set up a meal train or a chore chart among family and friends. Schedule a specific task and do it. Then do it again or do something else but keep helping as often as you can. A person diagnosed with lung cancer can use all the support and help you have to offer for the duration of their treatments and recovery. You’d want people to do the same for you.
    5. Seek outside support.
    If you don’t have time to spare to take on responsibilities and physically help the patient, there are still ways you can help. You can research to find outside resources to help support the patient and their family. You can find volunteer organizations who offer rides to treatments, you can contact churches and groups to mow lawns and do light housekeeping and deliver meals. You can even find cancer support groups and mentors/support buddies for the patient. Ask them what their needs are and work to help fulfill them. You can find a listing of resources on the LUNGevity Caregiver Resource Center.
  9. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from diane_arvizo in How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer / by Katie Brown   
    How to Help Someone with Lung Cancer
    June 11th, 2013 - by Katie Brown
    http://blog.lungevity.org/2013/06/11/ho ... ng-cancer/
    I’ve been thinking a lot about Lori Hope lately. In case you didn’t have the pleasure of knowing her IRL or online, here is a link that will give you a little more information about who Lori was.
    Lori was a lung cancer survivor who defied odds and outlived her prognosis. She was such an inspiration and source of hope to so many people in the cancer community. She was a rare soul. She was a cancer survivor who thought about others. I’ve known my share of cancer survivors who thought only of themselves. She often thought of those newly diagnosed and about their families. She wanted to leave this world a better place than when she was diagnosed and I admired her so much for how huge her heart was. Lori died September 2012 and is very missed by so many.
    Lori’s book. Help Me Live: 20 Things People With Cancer Want You To Know has been a reference for so many of us who support patients and families. A copy of that book sits on a shelf above my desk. I see it every day when I walk into my office.
    Today it’s inspired me to write my own list; a list specific to lung cancer.
    HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WITH LUNG CANCER
    Life’s financial burdens, family, children, employers and household chores don’t disappear when a lung cancer diagnosis happens. Navigating the medical process and surviving treatments and side effects are added to the mountain of responsibilities a person typically has.
    These are just 5 simple ways that you can help someone you care about who’s been diagnosed with lung cancer.
    1. Don’t ask if they smoked.
    Instead, show them that you care. Empathy and sympathy comes easier to those who’ve been diagnosed with other types of cancers. With lung cancer there are misconceptions about the disease and who can get it. Some people may believe that lung cancer is solely a preventable disease and don’t know that all you need to get lung cancer are lungs. There may be blame or even guilt associated with a lung cancer diagnosis. While lifestyle can play a part with any health issue, it isn’t your place to assess the cause of their lung cancer or place any blame upon them. When you learn of someone’s lung cancer diagnosis you need to decide whether or not you’re going to be a part of their supporting team.
    In one interview, Lori Hope mentioned how “OK” it was to say that a person’s diagnosis was “unfair”. Saying a diagnosis is unfair lets the patients know that you care; you understand that it could happen to anyone and that there is no blame placed upon the patient for their diagnosis.
    2. Listen.
    Listen to the patient. Some patients are blessed with family members and friends who will become caregivers and can support them throughout their lung cancer experience. Everyone wants to help and sometimes the wishes of the patient and even how they are feeling emotionally about their health and future can get lost in the day to day responsibilities. Don’t forget to include the patient in every aspect of decision making unless they defer all responsibility of that task to a specific person. Don’t forget to ask how the patient is doing and listen to the patient talk about how they are feeling about their situation. It’s ok not to know what to say or not have any answers. Just listen.
    Listen for the patient. Doctors’ appointments, treatments, procedures and life changes are overwhelming. It can be difficult emotionally to process all the things coming at you. Ask the patient to designate a healthcare advocate or “listener”. This person will go to doctor’s appointments, writes down questions and answers and records side effects and anything else the patient is experiencing and act as a liaison between the patient and their doctors.
    3. Share hopeful stories and experiences.
    Don’t talk about how you lost someone to cancer to someone who’s just been diagnosed with it. The idea is to inspire and offer encouragement, not instill fear or dread or even false hope. If you don’t have any real positive stories of people surviving cancer, find some survivor stories to share and talk about everything else. Your conversations needn’t revolve around cancer all of the time.
    4. Don’t ask. DO.
    “Let me know if I can help.” You’ve probably said these words many times in your lifetime in many different circumstances. Did you mean it then? Do you mean it now? There are so many things people can do to help, but the patient and their family will rarely ask for help. And saying those words simply puts the onus back onto the patient and off your shoulders.
    Actions speak louder than words. Set up a meal train or a chore chart among family and friends. Schedule a specific task and do it. Then do it again or do something else but keep helping as often as you can. A person diagnosed with lung cancer can use all the support and help you have to offer for the duration of their treatments and recovery. You’d want people to do the same for you.
    5. Seek outside support.
    If you don’t have time to spare to take on responsibilities and physically help the patient, there are still ways you can help. You can research to find outside resources to help support the patient and their family. You can find volunteer organizations who offer rides to treatments, you can contact churches and groups to mow lawns and do light housekeeping and deliver meals. You can even find cancer support groups and mentors/support buddies for the patient. Ask them what their needs are and work to help fulfill them. You can find a listing of resources on the LUNGevity Caregiver Resource Center.
  10. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from CindyA in Dallas, TX HOPE Summit 2015: February 6 & 7   
    Texas and surrounding area LC Survivors!
    You're invited to attend the 2015 Dallas HOPE Summit! Register to reserve your spot today, registration is FREE.
     
    http://events.lungevity.org/site/Calendar?id=100821&view=Detail
     
    Dallas HOPE Summit 2015
    Embassy Suites DFW South
      4650 West Airport Freeway
    Irving, TX 75062
    Friday, February 6, 2015 - Saturday, February 7, 2015
     
    The LUNGevity HOPE Summit is a conference for lung cancer survivors. A survivor is anyone who has ever been diagnosed with lunch cancer of any stage, or in or out of active treatment. All conference sessions, speakers, and meals during the conference will be provided to all participants. The Welcome Reception and Regional HOPE Summit are free for lung cancer survivors, however space is limited and registration is required for all those who attend. This will be our second regional HOPE Summit in the Dallas area. Participants can attend this regional summit to connect with cancer experts, survivors and caregivers in the community to become inspired and informed about lung cancer and local resources.
     
  11. Like
    NikoleV got a reaction from RandyW in Advocacy Opportunities (Documentaries) for Lung Cancer Survivors   
    We have been asked to recruit for two advocacy opportunities (documentaries) for lung cancer survivors. Here is the criteria for each opportunity- if you are interested please email [email protected] for more information.
     
    #1
    • White
    • Male
    • 50-70 yrs.
    • Squamous
    • Currently being treated, or post-progression (i.e. “after the cancer got worse”); Relevant experiences to discuss.
     
    #2
    • Has recently progressed to 2nd line. 
    • Is active (i.e. a PS 0-1)
    • Does not have any oncogenic drivers (i.e. EGFR or ALK mutations).
    • Is extremely motivated to live as long as possible.
    • Is either within Indianapolis or the surrounding states if possible. 
    • Is willing to travel.
    • Is willing to share their story and speak in front of a large audience.
    • Is willing to allow a camera crew to videotape parts of their life once or twice a week for six weeks beginning in October or November. 
    • Is willing to use a handheld camcorder and direct their family members to use a handheld camcorder to videotape personal and family events during their journey.
    • Believes that more time is valuable to them even if it is six weeks of extra time.
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