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Found 16 results

  1. Here is the weekly clip report: U.S. News & World Report "From the 'Big C' to Cancer" https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-03-21/from-the-big-c-to-cancer Healio “Lower-Limb Arterial Thrombosis May Be Marker of Cancer” https://www.healio.com/cardiac-vascular-intervention/peripheral/news/online/{f342b55f-87eb-4edc-a0eb-608633079467}/lower-limb-arterial-thrombosis-may-be-marker-of-cancer Medscape “How to Improve Diversification of Patients with Cancer in Clinical Trials” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/894210 Oncology Nursing News "New Treatments for Lesser-Known Targets in NSCLC Are Emerging" http://www.oncnursingnews.com/web-exclusives/new-treatments-for-lesserknown-targets-in-nsclc-are-emerging Smithsonian Magazine “Could Immunotherapy Lead the Way to Fighting Cancer?” https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/immunotherapy-lead-way-fighting-cancer-180968392/ Medscape “From ALK to T790M: The Role of Liquid Biopsy in Lung Cancer” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/894215 Medical Xpress “RNA-Based Therapeutic Inhibits a Metabolic Pathway in Tumor-Initiating Lung Cancer Cells” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-03-rna-based-therapeutic-inhibits-metabolic-pathway.html Bloomberg “Robots Could Replace Surgeons in the Battle Against Cancer” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-03-23/robots-could-replace-surgeons-in-the-battle-against-cancer
  2. Alice Shaw, MD, PhD, is a pioneer in the field of targeted therapies for lung cancer—treatments designed to target specific gene mutations that are present in the cells of some patients. Her work was instrumental in earning FDA approval for three targeted therapies for patients with the ALK mutation: crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. She recently presented the results of a critical clinical trial that suggest alectinib could replace crizotinib as the initial treatment for ALK-positive patients. In addition to conducting groundbreaking research, Dr. Shaw is a celebrated thoracic oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School who primarily treats patients with lung cancer. Dr. Shaw recently spoke with LUNGevity about the changes in the field of targeted therapies and her advice for patients facing a lung cancer diagnosis. LUNGevity Foundation: How has the field of targeted therapies changed over the past decade? Alice Shaw: When I entered the field more than a decade ago, we only had one targeted therapy option and that was for patients with the EGFR mutation. Because this mutation is only found in 10%-15% of patients with lung cancer in this country, the vast majority of our patients only had chemotherapy as an option. But since then, numerous targeted therapies have been developed for patients with many different types of genetic alterations. This has resulted in many more options for our patients, and it has transformed the way we treat lung cancer. These targeted treatments are more effective and better tolerated than standard chemotherapy and, as a result, are improving the quality of life for patients. LF: What is the greatest obstacle to successfully treating lung cancer with targeted therapies? AS: The biggest issue is drug resistance. Targeted therapies typically work for a year or two, and then the cancer figures out a new way to grow. This is called drug resistance, and it is the most common reason a patient comes off a targeted therapy drug. There are numerous research groups, including mine, that are working on understanding drug resistance. Once we get a handle on how the cancer is developing resistance, we can work to find a drug or combination of drugs that can overcome that type of drug resistance. LF: How do you anticipate the field of targeted therapies changing over the next decade? AS: Over the next decade, we’re going to see more efforts focused on upfront treatment and preventing the development of resistance. Right now, we are developing lines of drugs that are typically given sequentially—once the cancer becomes resistant to the first drug, the second one is given, and so on. The drugs that we are developing now are actually more effective and often safer for patients than the older generation of drugs. We’ve already started moving these newer drugs into the front-line setting, including alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer and osimertinib for EGFR-mutant lung cancer. In addition, combination approaches may also move into the front-line setting. These combinations could include two targeted therapies, which may be more effective than a single targeted therapy, or multimodality strategies that incorporate highly potent targeted therapies to maximally reduce tumor burden and focused radiation to eradicate any residual sites of disease. These residual sites of disease may harbor the seeds of resistance, so targeting these sites may be particularly effective in preventing the development of resistance. Finally, over the next decade, I think we will be using more and more liquid biopsies, the sampling of circulating DNA shed from cancers. These liquid biopsies may help detect the first signs of resistance and may help us better tailor our targeted therapies to each patient. LF: What advice do you have for patients who are newly diagnosed with advanced-stage lung cancer? AS: I recommend that all patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage lung cancer undergo multiplex molecular testing and PDL1 testing. While EGFR, ALK, and ROS1 are the best studied of the molecular targets, there are many other important targets for which we have highly active targeted therapies—for example, BRAF, MET, RET, and NTRK1. I would also recommend that all patients consider participating in a clinical trial because it is the only way we have to bring new discoveries to patients and it is a great way for patients to access the latest cutting-edge treatments. Finally, I would also suggest that patients get involved with advocacy and research organizations such as LUNGevity Foundation. LUNGevity is an amazing resource for patients and their families and also helps fund critical research into new treatments for lung cancer. Many patients and oncologists participate in LUNGevity’s Breathe Deep walks and other events, which are so important to raising awareness and helping to connect all of us fighting against lung cancer. (Dr. Shaw is a member of LUNGevity Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board. She is also Director of the Center for Thoracic Cancers at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.) This blog was originally published in the LUNGevity Experts blog on February 6, 2018.
  3. Hi, SMAs, Here is the weekly clip report: Healio “Targeted Radiation Reduces Mortality for Early-Stage Lung Cancer” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/lung-cancer/news/in-the-journals/{ea2da7d0-cbee-4aba-bba7-5028dde05d69}/targeted-radiation-reduces-mortality-for-early-stage-lung-cancer OncLive “ALK Inhibitors Continue to Reshape Treatment in NSCLC” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/alk-inhibitors-continue-to-reshape-treatment-in-nsclc U.S. News & World Report “Are More People Dying of Cancer?” https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-02-20/are-more-people-dying-of-cancer Women’s Health “’How I Told My Siblings I Had Lung Cancer’” https://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/a18377542/lung-cancer-diagnosis/ OncLive “Clinical Trials Highlight Biomarker Progress in Lung Cancer” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/clinical-trials-highlight-biomarker-progress-in-lung-cancer Clinical Oncology “Imfinzi Granted New Indication to Reduce Risk for NSCLC Progression” http://www.clinicaloncology.com/FDA-Watch/Article/02-18/Imfinzi-Granted-New-Indication-to-Reduce-Risk-for-NSCLC-Progression/47007 OncLive “Larotrectinib Update Shows Durable Responses in TRK-Positive Cancers” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/larotrectinib-update-shows-durable-responses-in-trkpositive-cancers Cancer Therapy Advisor “Phase 2 Trial of AZD1775 for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer” https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/lung-cancer/azd1775-squamous-cell-lung-cancer-phase-2-trial/article/746115/ BBC News “Mini-Tumors’ Created to Battle Cancer” http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43154878 Medical Xpress “An Under-the-Radar Immune Cell Shows Potential in Fight Against Cancer” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-under-the-radar-immune-cell-potential-cancer.html GenomeWeb “New Extracellular Particle Could Prove Useful for Cancer Diagnosis, Monitoring” https://www.genomeweb.com/proteomics-protein-research/new-extracellular-particle-could-prove-useful-cancer-diagnosis
  4. I was diagnosed with Stage IV Lung Cancer on September 19, 2016. The doctor told us that it was inoperable and radiation was not an option. It felt as though I’d been punched in the stomach. I immediately began thinking of my children and my wife, Lisa, and that my time here on Earth was very limited. I had no words that day, only utter despair. As the initial shock wore off, and the option of getting selected for a trial medication was offered, I realized that I may have a chance at fighting cancer and not letting cancer "fight" me. I’m ALK positive, so I was able to start taking a targeted therapy drug. It was shortly after the diagnosis and when I had no choice but to accept this as my fate, that I made the decision to fight this disease by becoming proactive in my care. I have always been a man of strong faith, and God has not failed me yet. Sometimes it takes something so big to appreciate waking up each day to your family and the people you love! I pray to God every night to give me another day. I was looking for an organization that focused on spreading awareness about lung cancer and funding research. I also liked that LUNGevity provided so many different types of support. We created a team for Breathe Deep Boca Raton, a 5K walk and run that raised lung cancer awareness and funds for LUNGevity for research and support programs. My wife and I are very active in our community, so we started reaching out to people to encourage them to come out and support the event. We advertised in local restaurants and reached out to local schools and youth recreation programs, and got some things going. My kids and I used social media to spread the word and I followed up with phone calls to remind people to show up. A friend of mine is in a band, so we asked them to come out and play live music at the event. Parts of the event are more somber, when we’re honoring the people we’ve lost to this disease, but other parts are uplifting and hopeful when we talk about research and the progress being made. I think the impact in the community is two-fold. First, it helps to raise awareness about lung cancer. I felt so strongly about making sure people realize that lung cancer isn’t only for smoker. And it also brings awareness about LUNGevity and that this a specific organization to help people impacted by lung cancer. I’m grateful for the research and medication and for the support of my family, friends, and the community. I hope the fundraising goes toward research to help find more targeted therapies. We need to fund research for treatment options that increase survival rates and help contain and manage the disease. I’m ALK positive, and there are treatments for that specific mutation, but I’d like them to find treatments for other mutations as well. I still look at the glass half full, because today, I am still here. My loving wife and children stand with me every day in this long, tedious, sometimes unbearable cancer journey. Through my positive energy and prayers we stay strong, and in September 2017, we celebrated my one-year cancerversary!
  5. Here is the weekly clip report: PR Newswire “LUNGevity Foundation Kicks Off New Public Service Campaign to Alter View of Lung Cancer Diagnosis” https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lungevity-foundation-kicks-off-new-public-service-campaign-to-alter-view-of-lung-cancer-diagnosis-300583589.html Baylor College of Medicine “Immunotherapy Treatment Gives Lung Cancer Patient Second Chance” https://blogs.bcm.edu/2018/01/22/immunotherapy-treatment-gives-lung-cancer-patient-second-chance/ Variety “Allison Shearmur, ‘Rogue One,’ “Hunger Games’ Producer, Dies at 54” http://variety.com/2018/film/news/allison-shearmur-dead-dies-star-wars-hunger-games-1202670745/ South Fine Arts Blog “LUNGEVITY Arts Coffee House” http://southfinearts.blogspot.com/ EurekAlert! “Leading Medical Organizations Update Lung Cancer Guideline” https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/iaft-lmo012318.php PR Newswire “Biomarck Announces the Start of a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of BIO-11006 for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)” https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/biomarck-announces-the-start-of-a-phase-2-clinical-trial-of-bio-11006-for-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-nsclc-300586095.html Cleveland Clinic “Immunotherapy Triggers New Lease on Life for Lung Cancer Patients” https://newsroom.clevelandclinic.org/2018/01/22/immunotherapy-triggers-new-lease-on-life-for-lung-cancer-patient/ OncLive “Dr. Garon on Sequencing of Agents for Advanced Lung Cancer” http://www.onclive.com/onclive-tv/dr-garon-on-sequencing-of-agents-for-advanced-lung-cancer EurekAlert! “International Organizations Partner to Spread Awareness of Revised Lung Cancer Staging Criteria” https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/iaft-iop012318.php University of Chicago Medicine “Targeted Treatments Halt Spread of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer” https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/cancer-articles/targeted-treatments-halt-spread-of-advanced-non-small-cell-lung-cancer HealthDay “New Treatments Tackling Tough Lung Cancer” https://consumer.healthday.com/cancer-information-5/lung-cancer-news-100/new-treatments-tackling-tough-lung-cancer-730442.html Cancer Therapy Advisor “Lung Cancer: FDA Collaboration Highlights Real-World Immunotherapy Treatment Patterns” https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/lung-cancer/lung-cancer-fda-collaboration-immunotherapy-treatment-patterns/article/739081/ The ASCO Post “Ceritinib in ALK-Positive Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer” http://www.ascopost.com/issues/january-25-2018/ceritinib-in-alk-positive-metastatic-non-small-cell-lung-cancer/
  6. In December 2016, I started experiencing a lot of shoulder pain and then back pain leading to shortness of breath. I went in for an X-ray and MRI, and was told I had pneumonia. I knew that wasn’t correct because I hadn’t been sick enough to get pneumonia. I spoke to my doctor and insisted on being seen again right away. I was sent to the hospital to have a CT scan, which showed fluid in the lining of my lungs. I had the fluid tapped for testing and it was bloody. I was referred to a thoracic surgeon and underwent surgery to have the fluid drained in March of 2017. During surgery they did a scope to look around and found and removed a cancerous mass. I was diagnosed with Stage IV adenocarcinoma lung cancer. I was in the hospital for five days. When I got out on a Friday, I met with my oncologist. They decided to test the mass for genetic mutations. My oncologist called me at home to share the results. I was expecting bad news, but she said she had good news. Genetic testing showed that my cancer was caused by the ALK gene mutation. She told me that having a genetic mutation was like winning the lung cancer lottery because there were very effective treatment options. At the time, Alcensa was still a second-line treatment, but my oncologist and I pushed for me to be able to start taking the drug. It was so new that I was one of the first patients at my hospital to start taking it. Just a few weeks after I started taking Alcensa, it was approved as a first-line treatment. I have some physical challenges that impact me. Some of them are shortness of breath, muscle pain and fatigue. I have nerve pain from my thoracic surgery as well. I am also dealing with mental challenges. I am working fulltime however, I struggle with memory loss, focus and vision issues, all of which are side effects of my treatment. I also deal with some depression. I explain it to family members as mental torture. You try to enjoy living but, you are always aware that your life can be cut short at anytime. The cancer consumes your thoughts 24/7. That is really hard. I recently became a member of the ALK Positive Facebook group, which led me to LUNGevity Foundation. ALK Positive has partnered with LUNGevity for a research grant for our cause. It’s a great partnership. I wish I would have known about LUNGevity and the ALK Positive online support group right away. LUNGevity really advocates for patients. They are such a great source for support and information. I noted that they share survivor stories and I immediately decided that I wanted to share my story with others. The more we talk about lung cancer, the more others learn and we can get rid of the stigma. Putting faces to this disease makes a real impact. I would tell a newly diagnosed patient to reach out to support organizations like LUNGevity. Knowledge is power and there is hope. The more you know about this disease and advocate for yourself the better off you will be. It’s a scary road but a little easier when you find good support sources. Survivorship means I am living with this disease. I hope to keep living with this disease for many years and provide support and advocate for others. I do not want to sit and wait, I want to take action to help myself and others as much as possible. We need to fight for more research funding and to make others aware of this disease. I hope to touch others with lung cancer and inspire them to share their story and find their voice to advocate. I want to get the word out about ALK lung cancer and remove that stigma that it’s a smokers’ disease. Whether you smoked or not doesn’t matter. If you have lungs, you can get lung cancer. I hope that as others find their voices too, we can get the word out about how we lack sufficient funding for research. That is really important to me. 433 people die each day of lung cancer – we have to change this!
  7. Reposting this opportunity that came across my desk:
  8. LaurenH

    Sam McBride

    Around the first of December 2015 I noticed I was having some shortness of breath when I climbed the flight of stairs to my apartment. I didn't think much of it at the time. I just chalked it up to my age (62) and being out of shape. As time went on the shortness of breath became worse and I developed a persistent cough with some transient hoarseness. I decided it was time to see the doctor. My primary care provider diagnosed me with asthma/bronchitis, which I had many times over the years in the past. He put me on an antibiotic and an inhaler which usually worked. As the days went by and I did not get any better, I went back to see him. He switched the antibiotic and prescribed a cough syrup. I still wasn’t getting relief, so I went back a couple more times. The doctor seemed to be getting frustrated with me, and I knew I needed to see a specialist. I scheduled an appointment with a pulmonologist. A chest x-ray showed a large pleural effusion. I underwent a thoracentesis, which revealed malignant cells in the fluid. A CT also showed several masses in my right lung. I was sent to a thoracic surgeon who performed a pluerodisis and biopsy. The biopsy revealed stage 4 metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that tested positive for the ALK mutation. After learning about the advancements in the treatment of NSCLC, especially in the ALK mutation, I chose to have treatment. My oncologist recommended an oral targeted therapy drug Xalkori (crizotinib). He explained that the drug was not a "cure" but was very effective in shrinking or slowing tumor growth, which it did with very few side effects. Shortly after being diagnosed and before beginning treatment with Xalkori I started researching everything I could find about lung cancer just trying to get a better understanding of my disease and find support from others who were dealing with lung cancer, it was during this research that I came upon the LUNGevity website. The name was the first thing that attracted me, I thought it was a neat play on the word longevity but as I began reading I soon realized there was a wealth of information and support there and that the organizaton was very actively involved with funding for research which really appealed to me because I feel it is through research that a cure will one day be found. I liked what I learned and decided to become a Social Media Ambassador so that I could help spread the word about lung cancer and clear up some misconceptions about the disease. I attended a Hope summit put on by Lungevity in Washington DC where I was even more impressed with the organization and the wonderful people involved with it. The LUNGevity website, Inspire, and the Alkies Worldwide Facebook group have been valuable resources of information and support for me. I am also a member of a cancer support group at my church. The biggest challenge to me is always living with this disease in the back of my mind. Every scan or blood test reminds me that there is a potential killer living in my body and I don't know what it is up to until I get my results. It is as much a mental disease as it is a physical one. To me, a survivor is a person who has overcome something bad and lived to tell about it. If I could give any advice or words of wisdom to a newly diagnosed patient, I would first tell them that lung cancer is no longer the automatic death sentence that it was in the past. I would tell them to demand gene mutation testing so they know what kinds of treatment options are available. I would also tell them that lung cancer treatment is a waiting game. It’s helpful to distract yourself with life and not to focus solely on this disease. Don't give lung cancer that much power over you! I hope that my efforts as a volunteer will help raise awareness and funds for lung cancer research. I want to make people aware that it only takes lungs to get lung cancer. Sam and her husband Bob in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, shortly after her diagnosis.
  9. FDA Grants Genentech’s Alecensa Priority Review for Initial Treatment of People with ALK-Positive Lung Cancer South San Francisco, CA -- August 2, 2017 -- Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) and granted Priority Review for Alecensa® (alectinib) as an initial (first-line) treatment for people with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive, locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as detected by an FDA-approved test. The FDA will make a decision on approval by November 30, 2017. “Phase III results showed Alecensa reduced the risk of disease worsening by more than half compared to the current standard of care and lowered the risk of tumors spreading to or growing in the brain by more than 80 percent,” said Sandra Horning, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. “We are working closely with the FDA to bring this medicine as an initial treatment for people with ALK-positive NSCLC as soon as possible.” This sNDA submission for Alecensa is based on results from the Phase III ALEX and Phase III J-ALEX studies. A Priority Review designation is granted to proposed medicines that, if approved, the FDA has determined to have the potential to provide a significant improvement in the safety or effectiveness of the treatment, prevention or diagnosis of a serious disease. Alecensa received Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA in September 2016 for the treatment of adults with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC who have not received prior treatment with an ALK inhibitor. Breakthrough Therapy Designation is designed to expedite the development and review of medicines intended to treat serious or life-threatening diseases and to help ensure people have access to them through FDA approval as soon as possible. Breakthrough Therapy Designation was granted on the basis of the Phase III J-ALEX trial. Alecensa was granted accelerated approval by the FDA in December 2015 for the treatment of people with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC who have progressed on or are intolerant to crizotinib. The ALEX study is part of the company’s commitment in the U.S. to convert the current accelerated approval of Alecensa in people with ALK-positive, metastatic NSCLC who have progressed on or are intolerant to crizotinib to a full approval as an initial treatment. Read the full press release here.
  10. I'm a 32 year old mother of 2 who was diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC in March. Non smoker. I tested positive for the ALK mutation. I was pretty healthy other than a cough and some shortness of breath that kept being misdiagnosed as colds, pneumonia, etc. until my pcp finally sent me for a CT scan to rule out a pulmonary embolism (I had one a couple of years ago). They thought it was lymphoma at first until a biopsy came back as adenocarcinoma. A PET scan and MRI revealed a softball size tumor in my right lung, 5 tumors in my brain, multiple tumors in bones and multiple lymph nodes. I immediately was admitted to the hospital where I spent two weeks getting radiation everyday to shrink the large tumor in my lung. Once released we had to wait for the genetic testing to come back to see if I could do any of the target therapies. When it was revealed that I had the ALK mutation I started Xalkori. Not long after I underwent the Gamma Knife procedure to try to shrink the brain tumors. I have a MRI next week to check those results. The last CT scan I had showed I was responding well to the Xalkori, most of the lymph nodes have went down, the bone tumors are almost gone, and between the Xalkori and radiation the tumor in my lung is almost gone. I'm still dealing with some breathing issues due to pleural effusion and consolidation in my right lung as well as ground-glass opacity. But overall considering where I was a couple of months ago I'm doing well. Sorry for the long post, I just don't know anyone who's ever dealt with anything like this and was looking for some support. Thank you!
  11. Newly diagnosed with ALK, stage 4 lung cancer - stayed off the "internet" for 3 months - now I'm ready for support thanks
  12. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s preeminent lung cancer research foundation, today announced that Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD, has joined LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 20 world-renowned scientists and researchers that guides LUNGevity’s research program. The Scientific Advisory Board is integral to the Foundation, overseeing the scientific strategy and ensuring that grants are awarded to the researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as extending and improving lives of lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and Career Development Awards. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The research program is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. Dr. Shaw is the Director of the Center for Thoracic Cancers and the Paula O’Keeffe Endowed Chair of Thoracic Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. In addition to caring for patients with lung cancer, Dr. Shaw performs clinical and translational research. Her clinical research focuses on subsets of NSCLC that have unique driver mutations, such as EGFR, ALK, and ROS1. Her translational research focuses on understanding and making clear the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies; she is currently developing novel combination treatment strategies. Her research has helped to develop numerous FDA-approved targeted therapies for patients with oncogene-driven NSCLC, such as crizotinib (Xalkori®) for patients with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements. “We could not be happier that Dr. Shaw has joined our Scientific Advisory Board,” said Andrea Ferris, President and Chairman of LUNGevity Foundation. “She is a brilliant thinker, an innovator, and a compassionate advocate for her patients. In particular, her groundbreaking work that led to the development of Xalkori® has extended and improved the lives of many NSCLC patients. Her expertise and counsel will advance LUNGevity’s goal to increase and improve survivorship for those affected by lung cancer.” Read the full press release here.
  13. We met with my oncologist yesterday to discuss the recurrence of NSCLC in my right supraclavicular lymph node. The thoracic surgeon who performed my lobectomy agreed to perform this surgery, and I'm scheduled to consult with him on March 9th. The results are back on the tumor testing. It tested positive for ALK. The oncologist talked a bit about the drug crizotinib as a possible future treatment.
  14. Nothing can prepare a man and his family for a lung cancer diagnosis. I remember the night five years ago when my mom called me with bad news. My uncle, Keith, had just been diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer. Keith is my dad’s youngest brother, who is always making everyone laugh and giving the best bear hugs. He is a husband, father, and small business owner who coached all of his kids’ youth sports teams and never missed a game. My grandfather passed away from paranasal sinus cancer when Keith was seven, so he grew up without really knowing his dad. Because of that experience, Keith is determined to never leave an empty seat at an important family event. The night we found out that our beloved uncle had lung cancer, my sister and I cried together and hugged each other for a long time. We started asking questions like, “How did this happen?” and “Why him?” and “What does this mean?” Then we realized there was only one question we could actually attempt to answer: “What do we do about it?” My mom was at our local farmer’s market when by chance, she met Cindy, the founder of Breathe Deep Baltimore, one of LUNGevity’s grassroots events. Cindy started the Breathe Deep Baltimore walk in 2008 in loving memory of her mom. The event was taking place in Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Monica Barlow, the Orioles’ former PR Director who had the same ALK-positive lung cancer as my uncle, was the keynote speaker. We had to be there. Our first Breathe Deep walk as a family was hopeful and somber as we celebrated survivors and honored those we’ve lost to this terrible disease. Monica spoke about the groundbreaking research that LUNGevity was funding and how important it is to be strong advocates. That was the first time that my uncle met other lung cancer survivors. Until that day, he didn’t have anyone to talk to who understood what he was going through. Breathe Deep Baltimore felt like my family was part of an important movement, and that we were accomplishing something together that was much bigger than what any one of us could have done alone. I had just finished grad school and all of my work and volunteer experience was in marketing and event management, including positions with Susan G. Komen and American Cancer Society. I decided to join the Breathe Deep Baltimore committee and help plan future events. I had no idea then that this group of wonderful people would become like family to me. This September marked my uncle’s fifth year as a survivor, a milestone we celebrated as a family. His first year of treatment included chemotherapy, radiation, and surgeries. He took Xalkori, a targeted therapy drug, for three and a half years and recently switched to Alectinib, both with very positive results. This September also marked my fifth year on the Breathe Deep Baltimore committee and my second year as a LUNGevity employee. Working for LUNGevity, first as a volunteer and now as a full-time staff member, is incredibly rewarding. As the Digital Community Manager, I interact all day on social media and our online communities with patients, survivors, caregivers, and advocates. I am incredibly thankful for the people who are working to create a world where people with lung cancer live longer and better because of early detection and more effective treatments. I am grateful for the opportunity to know and work with these people and to help support others whose lives have been affected by lung cancer. By working together, I am determined and optimistic that we can stop lung cancer. There are always an infinite number of reasons to be hopeful.
  15. I am going to be setting up a booth to bring awareness and raise funds for Lung Cancer at local fairs and festivals. My booth will provide information, bandies and a donation bucket. I have acquired a small list of venues to set up my booth but would like to hear from everyone on any ideas they may have on any other settings to get our message out. I live in Mobile, AL. Thank you for any suggestions.
  16. For ALK: "FDA Grants Genentech’s Alecensa® (Alectinib) Accelerated Approval for People with a Specific Type of Lung Cancer " http://www.gene.com/media/press-releases/14615/2015-12-11/fda-grants-genentechs-alecensa-alectinib
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