Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'anxiety'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME NEW MEMBERS!
    • INTRODUCE YOURSELF!
  • STORIES OF SURVIVORSHIP
    • SHARE YOUR LUNG CANCER STORY
  • DISCUSSION FORUMS
    • GENERAL
    • LC SURVIVORS
    • NSCLC GROUP
    • SCLC GROUP
    • US VETERANS
    • CAREGIVER RESOURCE CENTER
  • TREATMENT FORUMS
    • CHEMOTHERAPY
    • IMMUNOTHERAPY
    • RADIATION
    • SURGERY
    • SUPPORTIVE CARE
  • LUNG CANCER NAVIGATOR
    • LUNG CANCER NAVIGATOR
  • NEWS / ADVOCACY
    • LUNG CANCER IN THE NEWS
    • ADVOCACY
  • LIVING WELL
    • HEALTHY LIVING / RECIPES
    • HOPE
    • JUST FOR FUN
  • SUPPORT
    • SUPPORT RESOURCES
  • GRIEF
    • GRIEF
  • TERMS OF USE
    • FEATURES AND SUPPORT

Blogs

  • An Advocates Perspective
  • Cheryncp123's Blog
  • Stay The Course
  • Lung Cancer Stories
  • Spree
  • Volunteer Voices
  • Caregivers Connection
  • Stage IV Treatment With S.B.R.T.
  • Susan Cornett
  • Robin S
  • Lung Cancer & Health Insurance: Tips on managing the mayhem.
  • Daze of My Life by Ken Lourie
  • CommUNITY Connection
  • Heather Smith
  • Lisa Haines
  • Veteran's Oprions
  • Cancer: holding his hand until his last breath
  • A Healthy Place
  • Lenny Blue
  • The Roscopal Effect
  • Ro
  • Sharron P
  • Loi ich suc khoe cua qua chi tu

Calendars

  • Survivorship Calendar
  • Advocacy Calendar
  • Events Calendar
  • Meetups Calendar

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


City


Province or district (if non-US)


Postal code


Country


Interests

Found 4 results

  1. Through Reddit I've been notified to find support here. So hopefully someone can shed some light on the current situation about my dad with the possibility of lung cancer. First I'll introduce myself. I'm David and I am 35 years old living with my wife and kids together. Furthermore a couple of years ago I've been diagnosed with Aspergers, so that could explain my overthinking ;). I am a full-time software engineer and love technology, science, gaming, cars, astronomy etc. In this case it's about my dad, he is 56 years old and has stopped smoking for 16 years now. My mom (58 now, but suffered a severe heart attack at 42 / reason my dad quit smoking) and I still smoke sadly (though I am smoking less and less for a couple of years, and now I am scared to dead so want to quit as quickly as possible). A couple of days ago my dad called me that he got the results back of his CT scan (with contrast dye).The doctor said they saw an anomaly and he is scheduled to get a bronchoscopy next week. Furthermore they ordered a PET scan the day before the bronchoscopy. The anomaly is the same anomaly which they saw back in 2017. It has grown from a marble to a tangerine size.. Sad part is they also did a PET scan in 2017 but they made a mistake with administering the contrast fluid (they spilled a lot), so I could be that cancer had not been picked up back then. Furthermore he did not receive any follow up scans or appointments. Back to 2021.. A month ago he got struck by the flu and pneumonia, he was very ill (breathless, tired, coughing blood) for more than a week. He went to the GP but the GP said it is most probably a viral infection so no meds are given. At the same time a chest x-ray is ordered. After the results of the chest x-ray they scheduled a CT scan and these are the results we are talking about here. They did not say if my dad should be worried, only that they observed an anomaly which showed highlighted due to the contrast dye. Though the strange part is that the observed mass was dark with surrounding white due to air (normally a dense mass is white and air fluids are dark on CT as far as I know). I've been looking up everything I know about CT scan results and follow up procedures, but to be honest it does not look good :(. Though I have read about false positives (sometimes as high as 33%). I really hope is benign or some leftovers of his recent pneumonia / astma attack. Coming week we hopefully know more after the PET scan and bronchoscopy.. I just can't let the thoughts go that it could be indeed cancer (and something could have been done back in 2017) :(. Something growing from a marble to a tangerine do not bode well.
  2. After a Lung Cancer diagnosis, it is normal and expected for even habitually calm people to worry about their futures. But what happens when those worries begin to “take over”, interfering with your ability to enjoy your life? Most of us are familiar with the quote by Barbara Cameron, “Worry about tomorrow steals the joy from today”. However, as cancer patients, our relationships with worry are usually more complicated than that. Worry, like any uncomfortable feeling, is often a signal that you have a need that has not been met. So, when you have a thought connected to a specific worry, try to dig under the surface of that thought. For example, “I’m worried that my scan will show progression” or “I’m worried that I won’t survive” are thoughts that, on the surface, we can’t do anything about. They are reasonable to have, but “joy stealers”, so to speak. Well, what if the unmet need behind those worries is “I need my fear validated”, “I need to be heard” or even “I need a hug”? Worries can also be motivating and empowering. For instance, worry about your children’s future might drive you to assign a legal guardian, should something happen to you. Worry about the lack of funding for Lung Cancer might spur you to be an advocate. The next time you have a worry related to your diagnosis, don’t dismiss it! Instead lean into it, feel it, and ask yourself the following questions – “Is my worry revealing an unmet need, and how do I get it met?” “Is my worry pointing me toward an empowering action?” All of this said, a Lung Cancer diagnosis can be so frightening, and personal circumstances so complicated, that sometimes worry is just too hard to manage. Options like therapy and medication can provide critical relief. After all, joy is a reasonable goal – and with the right support, it is within reach. Lisa Zarov, MSW, LCSW __________________________________________________ LUNGevity understands that a lung cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. To answer your questions, the Lung Cancer HELPLine offers toll-free, personalized support for patients and caregivers at any time along your lung cancer journey. Our oncology social workers are available to help you manage your emotional, financial, and support challenges. Dial 844-360-5864, Monday through Thursday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and Friday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm (Eastern time). Call as often as you need—LUNGevity is here for you with tools to help you navigate your lung cancer diagnosis.
  3. My name is Valerie. I am 28 years old, and I was diagnosed with lung cancer at age 26. I went through chemo no problem. I didn't even get nauseous, and my hair never fell out. The only bad symptoms I had was that it gave me terrible heartburn and fever like symptoms for a few days after. The results were stable. I was then put on Tagrisso. It wasn't bad either but I had occasional nausea. However, my tumors grew, so we switched to Tecentriq, an immunotherapy. Ever since I've been on immunotherapy, after treatment, my anxiety, pain, and depression increases for about a week and a half. Before immunotherapy, I had slight chronic anxiety and no depression, but I had pain issues. Now, a week and a half after immunotherapy, I feel hopeless, and afraid. I have panic attacks 3-4 times a day, which requires medicine to relieve .I also need to take more painkillers, because the pain gets so intense. Then I'm back to "normal" after that. Does this only happen to me or do you get this too?
  4. Are you a cancer patient or caregiver struggling with anxiety or depression? Are you worried that your fear, uncertainty or changes to your appearance or mobility will leave you depressed? Join the Cancer Support Community webinar, Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Coping with Anxiety and Depression on Wednesday, November 30 from 2:00pm-3:30pm ET. You will learn about ways to cope with the anxiety and depression that often accompany cancer. A psychologist and a social worker will both present information to help. The webinar features the following panelists: •Diane Robinson, PhD, UF Health Cancer Center – Orlando Health •Stacey Balkanski, LCSW, Program Director at Gilda’s Club South Florida •Shari Goldberg, Lung Cancer Survivor The webinar will be run through WebEx with a slide presentation. After the panelists’ presentations, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions through a chat feature during the Q&A session. Click here for more information or to register!
×
×
  • Create New...