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Found 11 results

  1. In my time as a caregiver for my parents, there is one theme that haunts every interaction and every decision: the status of the relationship between the folks having the conversation. (Well, duh, Danielle, because that theme determines most things in life, doesn’t it?) (Sure, Inner Monologue, you are correct, but I’m the one writing this, so shush!) Where was I? Oh, right. Relationships. I know there are stacks and stacks of scholarly works written on the complex navigation of relationships in a caregiving framework, and I am not qualified to weigh in on that ong
  2. “You know, I heard that green tea/apricot pits/jogging/apple cider vinegar/kale/broccoli/mustard greens/fresh avocados/yoga/this miracle powder/oil/salve/etc., etc., etc. will cure your mom’s cancer. You really need to try it. It worked for my cousin’s friend’s stepmom’s brother. Let me get you the information!” If you have ever had a loved one with cancer, you’ve heard these offers. You know exactly how they sound. The personal heroism of a friend or neighbor or acquaintance or coworker, offered bravely to your face, can feel so affrontive and offensive. This is especially true when med
  3. Happy Monday, my friends! (Yeah, I know, it’s weird, I said “Happy” Monday…it’s not necessarily an oxymoron…hear me out!) I was always the kid who enjoyed the first day of school. How about you? The first day of vacation was pretty great, too! There is great power in “firsts.” We are almost supernaturally (or superstitiously!) drawn to the gravitas of beginnings. I remember very clearly making a circle of hands around my mother when she began her first treatment: my dad, some close friends, the nurses at the infusion center. Some of us prayed, some of us stood silent, some
  4. Sometimes, HOPE is a kitten. Okay, okay, sure, I know, that sounds a little weird. And a little bit like a desperate attempt to pass a poetry exam. Let me explain… Hope is strong and confident. Hope can be fickle. Hope can be hard to corral, name, and predict. Hope can be ephemeral, and hope is also everlasting. Hope can be full of contradictions. Hope can take many forms, directions, shapes, and sizes. You’ve heard the expression “herding cats?” Hope is one thing that cannot be herded. It is inspired, it cannot be forced, and it is felt differently by differ
  5. Hello, my dear friends! I. Have. Missed. You! It is so tempting, in my relationship with caregiving, to take on blame. Blame myself for this or that. Plans didn’t go off accordingly? It’s my fault. Time got away from me without my control? Oh, that’s my fault, too. Sign me up! Since my last post, our “best laid plans” were thrown out the window. Forcefully. To be totally real with you, my friends, I had wanted so badly to post about ALL THE HOPE in May. I wanted to fill your inboxes with notifications that there was a new post here every day. I wanted to fill your “Caregiver Qui
  6. Hello, my friends! I HOPE, wherever you are, that you are having a beautiful Spring! I HOPE, whatever you are up against, that you are finding support and peace in your endeavors. I HOPE, however you need, that you are finding the time to create room for yourself in your busy schedule. I HOPE, above all, that you and yours are doing well. Thanks to #LUNGevity, May is officially “Lung Cancer HOPE Month.” This particular awareness campaign places a much-needed focus on all there is to be HOPEful about in the #lungcancer world. To that end, we will be talking frequently t
  7. "Boy, what a week!" ...How many of you know that phrase by heart? All of you! (And not always starting with such an innocent word as "boy...") Well, that's been my week. And I know it probably has been for you, too. Just by way of illustration: I went to the grocery store a week ago. On the day of my mom's most recent treatment. Mom's treatment stays usually last about 6 hours, so the day is toast by the time we get home, and we are "pooped." So, back to the groceries. I. Just. Now. Finished. Unloading. The. Car. Don't get me wrong: I got the precious perishables out as so
  8. LUNGevity Foundation Partners With CancerCare to Launch Lung Cancer HELPLine Free Service Addresses Emotional, Practical, and Information Needs of Lung Cancer Patients FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Amanda Greenfield [email protected] 212-561-7430 WASHINGTON, DC (January 19, 2017) – LUNGevity, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization, today announced the launch of the LUNGevity Lung Cancer HELPLine, a free phone service through which a team of professional oncology social workers will be available to address the emotiona
  9. I'm a three and a half year survivor of Stage 2 Adenocarcinoma. I wanted to pay forward some of the great support and advice I received from others when I was first diagnosed and wrote a book about getting diagnosed, having my left upper lung removed, going through chemotherapy, losing my hair, and all the various points along the way. I included some terminology since I had no idea how to speak cancer as well as some resources - most of which I learned about after I was done and was researching for the book. Kirkus did a review of the book, (The Cancer Card, Dealing with a Diagnosis) and
  10. It’s normal for someone diagnosed with cancer to experience feelings of sadness, fear, anger and grief. It’s when those feelings prevent you from functioning in your everyday life and you feel emotionally paralyzed in your situation for an extended period of time that you need to seek help. Cancer patients experience depression two times more than the general population and studies have shown that mental health and social well-being can affect the success of treatment. Those diagnosed with cancer have life plans that are interrupted, a change in physical activity and ability, role chang
  11. Do you have questions about how a cancer diagnosis might affect you or someone you care about? Join the Cancer Legal Resource Center for a Summer 2016 Webinar Series to learn about important legal issues that stem from a cancer diagnosis in four different webinars. July 13, 2016: 5 Legal Tips for Recently Diagnosed Cancer Patients Join us for a webinar on Jul 13, 2016 at 12:00 PM PDT. Register now! Find out about the various legal issues that can stem from a cancer diagnosis, including employment law, insurance options, and disability insurance, and the laws that protect cancer pa
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