Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'chemo'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME NEW MEMBERS!
    • INTRODUCE YOURSELF!
  • STORIES OF SURVIVORSHIP
    • SHARE YOUR LUNG CANCER STORY
  • DISCUSSION FORUMS
    • GENERAL
    • LC SURVIVORS
    • NSCLC GROUP
    • SCLC GROUP
    • US VETERANS
    • CAREGIVER RESOURCE CENTER
  • TREATMENT FORUMS
    • CHEMOTHERAPY
    • IMMUNOTHERAPY
    • RADIATION
    • SURGERY
    • SUPPORTIVE CARE
  • LUNG CANCER NAVIGATOR
    • LUNG CANCER NAVIGATOR
  • NEWS / ADVOCACY
    • LUNG CANCER IN THE NEWS
    • ADVOCACY
  • LIVING WELL
    • HEALTHY LIVING / RECIPES
    • HOPE
    • JUST FOR FUN
  • SUPPORT
    • SUPPORT RESOURCES
  • GRIEF
    • GRIEF
  • TERMS OF USE
    • FEATURES AND SUPPORT

Blogs

  • An Advocates Perspective
  • Cheryncp123's Blog
  • Stay The Course
  • Lung Cancer Stories
  • Spree
  • Volunteer Voices
  • Caregivers Connection
  • Stage IV Treatment With S.B.R.T.
  • Susan Cornett
  • Robin S
  • Lung Cancer & Health Insurance: Tips on managing the mayhem.
  • Daze of My Life by Ken Lourie
  • CommUNITY Connection
  • Heather Smith
  • Lisa Haines
  • Veteran's Oprions
  • Cancer: holding his hand until his last breath
  • A Healthy Place
  • Lenny Blue
  • The Roscopal Effect
  • Ro
  • Sharron P
  • Loi ich suc khoe cua qua chi tu

Calendars

  • Survivorship Calendar
  • Advocacy Calendar
  • Events Calendar
  • Meetups Calendar

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


City


Province or district (if non-US)


Postal code


Country


Interests

Found 22 results

  1. I'm stuck. Often as it turns out, and I'm more than a decade away from active treatment. My veins, or what is left of them, run away and hide when in proximity of one of those IV devices. I'm down to about 4 scheduled draws a year. When in active treatment, I'd get poked that many times a week. What results from all of this mayhem - an irrational fear of blood draws. Needles and injections are a piece of cake. While in the army, we got vaccinated frequently, before every deployment, on a just in case basis. We had a thing called an official shot record that was faithfully recorded each vaccine but it was never consulted by army medical authorities. You just lined up for the assault by "jet injectors." Everyone would walk the line and a medic would grab each arm, dab with an alcohol swab, hit you with the jet injection, and tell you to move on. But there is a vast difference between an injection and an IV insertion. My first year after diagnosis, IV insertions were relatively easy. Sometime during my second year of treatment, missed insertions became common place. Moreover, even successful IV sticks often failed to deliver the infusion. Could it be callouses? I often went through 3 or more nurses trying to install a functioning IV. Once, they needed to call a CT technician to the infusion area because I used up every nurse in the place! Further, I once had an IV installed in my foot! Hospitals are the worst place to get an IV. Unlike my small cancer treatment clinic, where everyone knew my name and IV history, hospitals proclaim: "we are the experts". They proceed to stick and wiggle while inflicting high trauma, all the while saying "now sir, just relax, we know how to do this"! I hope I have time to make a large "Summon the Hard Stick IV Team" sign before my next hospital admission. Lessons learned. I've acquired a few. Most important, if you are offered a port before chemotherapy, get one. If not offered, then ask for one. A port settles the raging IV storm. Drink lots of water before the stick. Start drinking days before, not hours before. Tell the medical "professional" to use an inflatable blood pressure tourniquet in place of one of those thin rubber devices. Warming an area with a heating pad is nearly worthless unless the area is iced first. And, the heating pad must be tightly secured to be effective. Lidocaine patches work well if applied to a candidate area about 30 minutes before the stick. I've had some success with the aerosol freeze spray that is now in widespread use. I also take a .5mg Xanax about 30 minutes prior to a stick but my wife drives. Do not go quietly into your next IV stick session. If you are paired with one of those hearing impaired medical professionals who says "we know best" after you tell them you are a hard stick and they miss. Complain! Loudly! You are paying for all this madness, even for every miss. Stay the course. Tom
  2. Curious if any body can give me some information on Chemo side effects. It has been a month since my last Chemo treatment yet still have side effects. The one that concerns me the most is that once or twice a week I go thru short periods of vomiting. I'm not nauseated, but it hits suddenly and with little time to react. I am doing radiation but didnt think that was a side effect. The fact it's not constant is what bothers me. Any body else experience something similar. Peace Tom
  3. I forgot to ask this. What should I wear for Chemo? Loose fitting button down? Sweat shirt? Pants? Probably a dumb question and probably too late Tom
  4. Any thoughts/Experience?? High doses of vitamin C to improve cancer treatment passes human safety trial https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170330142341.htm
  5. TJM

    Question on port

    Question for those who have had ports. Mine was installed on Friday and is still pretty tender. I took off the bandage yesterday per instructions and the wound looks OK. No swelling or real redness but when I touch it or move in a certain way it hurts. I assume this will get better? My first use will be Thursday. I will use it bit think it might be more painful than the IV. Thanks in advance Tom
  6. This post is just to demonstrate use of tags. Peace Tom
  7. Hello fellow survivors and caregivers. I have a difficult decision to make and would appreciate your feedback. Can I avoid more Chemo? Advice appreciated, details below... This summer I was diagnosed with NSCLC lung cancer (Stage 3B), and I've since been through chemo, radiation and successful surgery to remove my upper left lobe. My oncologist initially said he would be okay with just doing observation (CT scans every 3 months) as a next step rather than adjuvant chemo after my surgery. He said the Tumor Board was split on their opinion of doing more chemo vs observation, and I was within "national guidelines" to just observe since I was re-staged to 2A after surgery. I'm 53, never smoked, and am generally fit and healthy. My oncologist then shared my case with Dana-Farber. They recommended adjuvant chemo (2 treatments) with Carboplatin plus a new chemical I did not have before - Taxol - which will have more side effects that what I've experienced (hair loss) and would set me back in my recovery in some ways. I'm not currently employed and aiming to get back in the job market so losing my hair and looking like a cancer patient is not going to help. See below for details on my case: Diagnosis pre-treatment (June 2019): 5.5 cm tumor in my upper left lobe - Adenocarcinoma NSCLC. Growing for at least 3 years prior to my bronchoscopy. Lymph node detected with cancerous cell during bronchoscopy MRIs and PET scans were negative - no spreading outside the lungs Treatment completed (July-August 2019): 3 doses of Chemo total. 2 doses of Cisplatin + Alimta/pemetrexed, and 1 dose of Carboplatin + Alimta/pemetrexed 30 rounds of radiation - 54 Grey Doses total. Aimed at tumor and lymph nodes. Surgery completed Oct 7th: Upper left lobe resection along with removal of all local lymph nodes. VATS technique. Went well. Results: Tumor margins were clear. All lymph nodes negative. Tumor shrank from 5.5 cm to 4.2cm due to treatment. Genetic testing: EGFR Exon 20 mutation found, no others present. Aftercare - Dec 2019: Oncologist says it's "my option" if I want to get more chemo "just in case" it helps a prevent recurrence. However, he can offer NO data on if more chemo will help or not. It's a leap of faith. The reason for switching to Taxol is my tumor only shrank from 5.5 cm to 4.2 cm after chemo/radiation. Also, the tumor was more than 10% alive upon resection. I already have side effects of tinnitus from the Cisplatin (which is why they switched me to Carboplatin for the 3rd cycle), plus neuropathy in my feet. I really don't want to suffer hair loss (which Taxol causes) as I'm looking for a job and don't want to look like a cancer patient while interviewing. I believe 2 treatments of Taxol+Carboplatin would set me back 4-5 months before I get back to "normal". Plus it could increase my existing neuropathy. TLDR: I want to get back to my normal life and avoid additional chemo (especially Taxol) if possible. I also don't want to relapse, but my oncologist says there is no data on the effectiveness of doing more chemo. It's my option. I need to decide soon - it's about 2 months after surgery. What would you do?
  8. Hello fellow survivors and caregivers. I have a difficult decision to make and would appreciate your feedback. Can I avoid more Chemo? Advice appreciated, details below... This summer I was diagnosed with NSCLC lung cancer (Stage 3B), and I've since been through chemo, radiation and successful surgery to remove my upper left lobe. My oncologist initially said he would be okay with just doing observation (CT scans every 3 months) as a next step rather than adjuvant chemo after my surgery. He said the Tumor Board was split on their opinion of doing more chemo vs observation, and I was within "national guidelines" to just observe since I was re-staged to 2A after surgery. I'm 53, never smoked, and am generally fit and healthy. My oncologist then shared my case with Dana-Farber. They recommended adjuvant chemo (2 treatments) with Carboplatin plus a new chemical I did not have before - Taxol - which will have more side effects that what I've experienced (hair loss) and would set me back in my recovery in some ways. I'm not currently employed and aiming to get back in the job market so losing my hair and looking like a cancer patient is not going to help. See below for details on my case: Diagnosis pre-treatment (June 2019): 5.5 cm tumor in my upper left lobe - Adenocarcinoma NSCLC. Growing for at least 3 years prior to my bronchoscopy. Lymph node detected with cancerous cell during bronchoscopy MRIs and PET scans were negative - no spreading outside the lungs Treatment completed (July-August 2019): 3 doses of Chemo total. 2 doses of Cisplatin + Alimta/pemetrexed, and 1 dose of Carboplatin + Alimta/pemetrexed 30 rounds of radiation - 54 Grey Doses total. Aimed at tumor and lymph nodes. Surgery completed Oct 7th: Upper left lobe resection along with removal of all local lymph nodes. VATS technique. Went well. Results: Tumor margins were clear. All lymph nodes negative. Tumor shrank from 5.5 cm to 4.2 due to treatment. Genetic testing: EGFR Exon 20 mutation found, no others present. Aftercare - Dec 2019: Oncologist says it's "my option" if I want to get more chemo "just in case" it helps a prevent recurrence. However, he can offer NO data on if more chemo will help or not. It's a leap of faith. The reason for switching to Taxol is my tumor only shrank from 5.5 cm to 4.2 cm after chemo/radiation. Also, the tumor was more than 10% alive upon resection. I already have side effects of tinnitus from the Cisplatin (which is why they switched me to Carboplatin for the 3rd cycle), plus neuropathy in my feet. I really don't want to suffer hair loss (which Taxol causes) as I'm looking for a job and don't want to look like a cancer patient while interviewing. I believe 2 treatments of Taxol+Carboplatin would set me back 4-5 months before I get back to "normal". Plus it could increase my existing neuropathy. TLDR: I want to get back to my normal life and avoid additional chemo (especially Taxol) if possible. I also don't want to relapse, but my oncologist says there is no data on the effectiveness of doing more chemo. It's my option. I need to decide soon - it's about 2 months after surgery. What would you do?
  9. Keytruda Vs. Chemo & Radiation... I can't decide! This is for my mom - age 74 with numerous health issues just diagnosed in December with Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma, though the stage is not confirmed - they're guessing stage 4. She has a general oncologist locally, and a lung oncologist's second opinion with the best credentials at MD Anderson, but frankly, we're unhappy with both oncologists, but it's a toss up between which treatment regimen is best to try at least first - these are the facts: Her current health issues: Mild-moderate COPD with a bit of wheezing (though she doesn't feel like it bothers her at all - it's just her throat making a weird noise when she talks) once a month or so for a few days smokes 8 cigarettes a day still (had one right after returning home after her lung biopsy) facet arthritis in neck and vertebrae esp. lower back, stenosis, dextroscoliosis fell down 1/29/19 on right hip which causes her immense pain daily vascular degeneration small vessel disease causing confusion and early signs of dementia - brother died of alzheimer's - massive anxiety and depression but refuses medication/anti-depressants degenerative disc disease varicose veins in legs, right carotid artery blockage around 70% (not enough for surgery yet given all of her other issues, but she did have a mini-stroke in 2015) Slight colonic inflammation (as viewed on PET in 12/2018 - Gastro doc says doubtful it's cancer) Aortic valve leak from previous radiation 21 years ago causing loud heart murmur Prior breast cancer from 21 years ago (both mother and sister passed from same cancer) - stage 3B or so - told her 1-2 years to live, had full mastectomy of left breast & FAC Chemo & Radiation (she had 0 symptoms except hair loss, and felt almost no poisoning or weakness at all, amazingly at age 53) ...alive 21 years later - she had a strong will to live as I was 12 years old, and father died when I was 8 - only child. General local oncologist: (same one from 21 years ago) 12/2018 - found 2.8 cm tumor in left lobe on ER visit for chest pain (in 2015, it was 1.1 cm and too small to worry about at that point) along with a few very small nodules on the other lobe and a mediastinal mass, oncologists scheduled numerous diagnostic work-ups, thinks it 'may' be in the rib bone and chest lymph nodes but no brain or other organ mets, ordered a lung biopsy, which was inconclusive and did not retrieve any malignant cells from a needle biopsy through the back (radiologist #1) **I took her to a musculoskeletal oncologist to rule out bone mets, and he said he thinks it's just arthritic inflammation, not cancer - so he wouldn't stage it as 4 for bone. 2) 1/2019 - referred her to a thoracic surgeon for a thoracoscopy to get a biopsy, however after the pre-op cardiologist found the aortic valve leak which could lead to a heart attack under general anesthesia... 3) 2/2019 - we decided to pursue another needle biopsy requesting it from the front, and that led to a successful diagnosis almost 2 months later (radiologist #2). So he delayed everything by a month asking for a procedure, which was unnecessary due to the fault of the previous radiologist who told him he was confident another needle biopsy would not work. 4) 3/2019 - Mutation panel came back - 100% positive for PD-L1 on all tumor cells, and negative for all other mutations = strong contender for Keytruda, so his recommendation is to treat solely with Keytruda as he believes chemo at her age with her conditions would be more detrimental to her health. My concern is with all of her other issues, the COPD and arthritis especially, that if the immune system attacks healthy tissue, pneumonitis, colitis, or even lung collapse could happen, and we'd have to be watching her like a hawk for so many potentially fatal side effects, yet the nurse says most of her patients have no issues with keytruda other than minor flu-like symptoms. Medicare and supplemental BCBS covers all of it, and she is ready to go with it any day now once we decide. MD Anderson Lung Oncologist with amazing background credentials: 3/2019 - He wants to order another diagnostic procedure, a bronchoscopy, to insure the lymph nodes are malignant in order to better stage the cancer. This will delay treatment further, could have issues with the anesthesia propofol causing respiratory depression with her COPD, and my question is what is the point at this stage -- there is a mass there in the mediastinum - it's probably malignant being so close to the lung and the heart - what else would it be? It seems like a waste to do this procedure, when the targeted therapy with 100% mutation could treat the entire system. - Depending on if it's malignant, he says chemo and radiation - radiation only if a radiation therapist says she is eligible given her chest being scarred from 21 years prior. If not malignant, just chemo for the nodules in the lungs.... So... chemo is toxic, radiation would be damaging to her already damaged organs... and I don't think chemo on its own has a higher chance of survival with lung cancer vs. targeted therapy with that percentage mutation. But then again 21 years ago before all of her other issues popped up, she did amazing with the most aggressive chemo there is I'm told - FAC But he is the best oncologist credential-wise and is at MD Anderson, which is supposed to be the best. I think maybe he steers away from immunotherapy because of the unknown risk of damaging and lasting side effects to the body vs. chemo, once you're done, you're done... but with her age and all her issues, it's just so difficult to decide on what to pick. Neither of them mentioned doing a combo of immuno/chemo, so it's either one or the other at this point in terms of what they'll order.
  10. Hello, this is my first post. My dad was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer, non-small cell, adenocarcinoma the end of July. They found 10-13 lesions in the brain, one area on the adrenal gland , one on the spine , and possibly a small area on the liver. My dad had 2 weeks of radiation on the brain immediately. Before treatment, he got very unsteady and had a drop foot. After radiation, he got most of his coordination back. He had palliative radiation to the place on his spine for pain. Last Monday, my dad's oncologist put my dad on 2 chemo drugs (not sure the names at this time) and ketruda (immunotherapy drug). His oncologist said this was recently approved by the FDA to give both at the same time? I really haven't seen any info about this. I am just wondering if this is a new thing, or are they throwing all of this at my dad at once thinking he don't have much time and this is his best option? Thanks.
  11. Hi, I am looking to learn more about holistic treatments that can be combined with traditional chemo and maintenance treatment in patients with Stage IV NSCLC, EGR negative. I have been reading about the benefits of turmeric, frankincense, and maitake mushrooms on different forums and cancer center sites. I was wondering if anyone has any recommendations or knowledge about whether alternative therapies can help with symptom management and cancer regression, and also if anyone knows of negative side effects to be aware of. Thanks! Liz
  12. Hi Everyone! I had a pretty treatment specific question. My Mom's first line of treatment was Carboplatin and Alimta which she handled VERY well and had a great response to as a chemotherapy drug. As her cancer has recently returned, she's just started her second line treatment which is Carboplatin/Abraxane/Avastin. She only received the Carboplatin and Abraxane during her treatment yesterday as they found some blood in her urine so they didn't want to deliver the Avastin without first culturing that to see what was going on. Does anyone have an experience with this course of treatment (specifically this combination of drugs in 1st and 2nd line treatments)? I'm just curious what she can expect from the Carboplatin/Abraxane combo versus what she experienced with the Carboplatin and Alimta. I know each case and each person is different in terms of how they respond to chemo and what their side effects are (even on the same drug course) and I'm familiar with the side effects that are listed in general from each of these drugs just looking to see if someone here had different experiences with both forms of treatment. I know its pretty specific so I'm not sure that this makes sense, but trying to get a gauge for her from others who have experienced them. Thanks in advance, Maigan
  13. I think we can all agree that chemo stinks. I had four rounds of cisplatin/pemexetred last year and I'm 3 weeks into 6 weeks of carboplatin/taxol for a recurrence. Last year, my girlfriends and I decided to have themes for chemo. One session was 80s and the last session was Mardi Gras. We had beads and boas for everyone. We're doing the same thing again this year. We had spring fling, beach fun, and today's pajama party. For some reason, my husband wants no part of the costume concept! I'm sharing this in the hopes that it will inspire you to find a way to get through chemo with a smile. If we don't laugh, we cry.
  14. Jg_miller

    Alimta

    Any body on Alimta? Side effects, success stories, etc. I start next Monday on alimta. First chemo platinum, then opdivo.
  15. Hi, Just a quick introduction of a now 64 year old man with stage 4 lung non small cell lung cancer. I have been arguing with this disease for 4 years now and as I listed the various forms of treatments that I have undergone. I won't bore anyone with the details but would be more then happy to answer anyone's questions about any of the treatments that I have had. There seem to be numerous questions about immunology drugs such as Optivo. If I can help just shout at me (or a soft whisper would do fine).
  16. Looking for small cell lung cancer survivor who quit chemo after having started. Please email [email protected]
  17. My Dad Started chemo on May 12 (Carbo/Taxol). He had treatments once a week for 4 weeks then a week off. The last few visits, his bloodwork wasn't what the Dr thought it should be, so they didn't give him the Carbo, just Taxol. Last week, Dr called out of the blue and said he wanted Dad to get an abdominal ultrasound immediately. The following day, Dr asked us to come to his office. It seems the chemo has caused some damage to Dad's kidneys. Now they've stopped chemo until kidneys recover. Question to anyone is, what does this "really" mean? Are we facing a small blip or hitting a wall? Amy insight is appreciated. As an aside, I don't have lots of confidence in the Doctor- frequently forgets Dad's situation, brings in week old labs to appointments, etc. However dad likes him and wants to keep him. Thank you!
  18. Hello everyone, Here is a great opportunity to make food taste good again during chemotherapy! ________________________________________________________________________________ My name is Jessie Callahan. I am the Marketing Director at Cooking for Chemo. We are teaming up with Gilda's Club Chicago on April 20th @ 6 pm to teach a virtual class on Cooking for Chemo. I am writing to invite you to come to the webinar. The presentation will be held at their clubhouse. Gilda's Club Chicago Wells Street Clubhouse 537 North Wells Street Chicago, IL 60654 The event is 100% FREE and is available to anyone who would like to join. We encourage you, your staff, and anyone you help to attend this webinar. In this virtual class, Chef Ryan, teaches you the basics on how to adjust your cooking and make food taste good again during chemotherapy. His techniques focus on teaching you how to combat metallic tastes, loss of appetite, and mouth sores. This class will change the way you see food and help improve your quality of life. Cooking for Chemo ...and After! is a how-to-cook cookbook that teaches you how to adjust your cooking for chemotherapy patients. For more information on Cooking for Chemo and Chef Ryan Callahan: cookingforchemo.org To register for the event: http://www.gildasclubchicago.org/calendar/790/cooking-chemo-webinar?s=1461193200&e=1461198600
  19. Dad went for 12 week checkup today - has been on Opdivo and has been feeling pretty good. However, he hasn't been on any chemo yet. Everything I read about Opdivo says that it is for "those who have previously been on platinum-based chemo." The doctor, who has been the only oncologist that my Dad has seen, seemed to think that Dad had been on some chemo previously. I'm concerned that the doctor hasn't been paying attention, since he never prescribed chemo, just Opdivo - and I'm worried about what the concequences of having not had chemo on his prognosis. Any thoughts from the group?
  20. I begin with Carboplatin, alimta, and Avastin one time per week every 3 weeks. Dr put me on folic acid and a steroid taken day before chem for 3days. What are typical things to expect... I heard the nausea comes one to 3 days later? Any tiips, recommendations are welcome.
  21. Not really sure what to say here i have a rare form of cancer that attacks the lungs and other parts of the body its called langerhans cell hystosis.I am 49 and on 6 liters of air andstarting chemo this week for lungs and a brain tumor as well. I am not sure what to expect and doctors are not very forthcoming with information. So here i sit in limbo and terrified
  22. I begin with Carboplatin, alimta, and Avastin one time per week every 3 weeks. Dr put me on folic acid and a steroid taken day before chem for 3days. What are typical things to expect... I heard the nausea comes one to 3 days later? Any tiips, recommendations are welcome.
×
×
  • Create New...