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Found 5 results

  1. My name is Valerie. I am 28 years old, and I was diagnosed with lung cancer at age 26. I went through chemo no problem. I didn't even get nauseous, and my hair never fell out. The only bad symptoms I had was that it gave me terrible heartburn and fever like symptoms for a few days after. The results were stable. I was then put on Tagrisso. It wasn't bad either but I had occasional nausea. However, my tumors grew, so we switched to Tecentriq, an immunotherapy. Ever since I've been on immunotherapy, after treatment, my anxiety, pain, and depression increases for about a week and a half. Before immunotherapy, I had slight chronic anxiety and no depression, but I had pain issues. Now, a week and a half after immunotherapy, I feel hopeless, and afraid. I have panic attacks 3-4 times a day, which requires medicine to relieve .I also need to take more painkillers, because the pain gets so intense. Then I'm back to "normal" after that. Does this only happen to me or do you get this too?
  2. Hi Again! I was diagnosed with Small Cell Lung Cancer in 2015, and am in remission. I had 5 treatments of Chemo, and 6 weeks of radiation, followed by 10 days of brain radiation. I felt so horrible for well, just getting a little better now in March of 2017. I already had a diagnosis of Depression before treatment, but now it seems to have taken hold and is overwhelming. Has anybody else experienced no energy, sleeping all the time, and increased depression as long as 2 years after treatment? My Oncologist says it it due to my use of pain killers which I have taken for at least 10 years, and has nothing to do with the treatment. Now I have a ruptured disc in my back, and several compressed discs in my neck, Fibromyalgia, which I've had for years, BOOP, COPD, etc, etc. My hair is dry and my scalp is itchy, and my skin is horrible... dry, flaky, and itchy. I'd like to hear about other peoples' experiences after chemo and radiation. Did it make you forgetful? Were you overly emotional all the time? Confused? How long did it last? I thank you in advance for any way that you could help me.
  3. Are you a cancer patient or caregiver struggling with anxiety or depression? Are you worried that your fear, uncertainty or changes to your appearance or mobility will leave you depressed? Join the Cancer Support Community webinar, Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Coping with Anxiety and Depression on Wednesday, November 30 from 2:00pm-3:30pm ET. You will learn about ways to cope with the anxiety and depression that often accompany cancer. A psychologist and a social worker will both present information to help. The webinar features the following panelists: •Diane Robinson, PhD, UF Health Cancer Center – Orlando Health •Stacey Balkanski, LCSW, Program Director at Gilda’s Club South Florida •Shari Goldberg, Lung Cancer Survivor The webinar will be run through WebEx with a slide presentation. After the panelists’ presentations, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions through a chat feature during the Q&A session. Click here for more information or to register!
  4. It’s normal for someone diagnosed with cancer to experience feelings of sadness, fear, anger and grief. It’s when those feelings prevent you from functioning in your everyday life and you feel emotionally paralyzed in your situation for an extended period of time that you need to seek help. Cancer patients experience depression two times more than the general population and studies have shown that mental health and social well-being can affect the success of treatment. Those diagnosed with cancer have life plans that are interrupted, a change in physical activity and ability, role changes in relationships, and career, may experience a loss of self-image or sense of self. They also experience fears about the cancer growing within their bodies, anxiety about the success or failure of treatments, worry over their families and caregivers and may fixate on the possibility that their lives will be cut short from their disease. Those diagnosed with lung cancer have an additional set of issues facing them. Some may experience the stigma associated with the disease and experience anger or guilt, isolation or shame depending on whether or not they had a smoking history and whether or not they feel they are getting adequate medical and emotional support from their local communities. Lung cancer survivors may also feel outrage, anger and a sense of being forgotten because of lack of public awareness and support of the disease in the media, limited treatment options available for the disease and sparse funding that goes to research the disease. Depression is more than just the normal feelings of sadness. Depression is when an individual experiences at least one of the following symptoms for more than two weeks: Feeling sad most of the time Loss of pleasure and interest in activities you used to enjoy Changes in eating and sleeping habits Nervousness Slow physical and mental responses Unexplained tiredness Feeling worthless Feeling guilt for no reason Decreased concentration ability Thoughts of death or suicide Getting help for your depression can help your cancer experience feel less challenging; it may help your relationships with the people around you may give you back some sense of control over certain parts of your life. Visit the National Cancer Institute for more information on depression in cancer patients and call your doctor if you feel like you may be suffering from depression. ______________________ Did you experience depression with your lung cancer diagnosis? Share your tips on how you dealt with your depression by commenting below.
  5. The demands of lung cancer caregiving can be overwhelming, especially if you feel you have little control over the situation or you have little or no help. Let's chat about it! Have you ever felt helpless and powerless in your role as caregiver? It's important to watch for warning signs and take action right away to lighten your load and avoid serious burnout. TOPIC: Lung Cancer Caregiver Stress, Burnout, and Depression We will chat about signs and symptoms of caregiver stress and burnout. How can you recognize the signs of caregiver stress and burnout? What resources are available to help ease the burdens on lung cancer caregivers? Ways that families and friends can help their loved ones and share experiences and tips that may help others. DETAILS: Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2016 Time: 5pm Pacific/7pm Central/8pm Eastern This chat is open to ALL lung cancer caregivers, patients, survivors, and professionals. Are you a patient seeking help for your caregiver? This chat is for you too. TWITTER CHAT TIPS: A great online tool for Twitter chat participation is http://www.tchat.io/ Just log into your Twitter account from this site and then enter our chat hashtag #LCChat. You'll be able to follow right along and read everyone's tweets, retweets, likes, and replies!
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