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Found 16 results

  1. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization, announced today the recipients of its 2018 Career Development Awards (CDA) for lung cancer research. These coveted awards fund critical lung cancer research projects and offer the recipients world-class mentorship by LUNGevity’s prestigious Scientific Advisory Board. “We are excited to support these exceptionally talented new investigators. Interestingly, all three of these projects involve liquid biopsy-based approaches to detecting and optimizing treatment of lung cancer. These new projects may define new avenues for applying liquid biopsies in the clinical setting,” notes Charles Rudin, MD, PhD, Professor and Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and chair of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board. “We believe that this outstanding group of awardees will help make progress in improving outcomes for lung cancer patients.” LUNGevity is proud to support the following 2018 Career Development Award researchers: Kellie Smith, PhD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Immunometabolic T cell profiling as a prognostic liquid biopsy in non-small cell lung cancer. Dr. Smith’s research group will work to develop a liquid biopsy that predicts advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patient responses to combination immunotherapy regimens. Jeffrey Thompson, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Development of markers to predict response to immunotherapy in NSCLC. Dr. Thompson’s laboratory is working to develop blood-based tests to identify individuals most likely to respond to immunotherapy with minimum side effects, helping to ensure customized immunotherapies for advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. Edwin Yau, MD, PhD, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Lung cancer detection by CRISPR-based detection of circulating tumor DNA. Dr. Yau’s team is developing a quick and cost-effective blood test for early detection of lung cancer that will complement CT screening. “By funding young investigators, LUNGevity keeps outstanding scientists, still early in their careers, in the lung cancer space. We work closely with these researchers with the hope of seeing them become the next generation of scientific superstars,” says Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of LUNGevity. “The CDA program encourages their continued development in the field of lung cancer research to grow a strong pipeline of dedicated lung cancer researchers.” Under the stewardship of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 21 prominent scientists and researchers, LUNGevity ensures that grants are awarded to those researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as for extending and improving lives of lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and a robust Career Development Award Program. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The foundation’s overall research program, including CDA awards, is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. LUNGevity’s Scientific Research Program is supported by individual donors, the American Lung Association, Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Thomas G. Labrecque Foundation, Upstage Lung Cancer, and the Schmidt Legacy Foundation. Read the full press release.
  2. Here is the weekly clip report: OncLive “Dr. Larner on Integrating Radiation Therapy With Immune Checkpoint Blockade in NSCLC” https://www.onclive.com/onclive-tv/dr-larner-on-integrating-radiation-therapy-with-immune-checkpoint-blockade-in-nsclc Diagnostic Imaging “Low Dose CT Lung Cancer Screening Program Findings Similar to National Trial” http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/di-executive/low-dose-ct-lung-cancer-screening-program-findings-similar-national-trial Targeted Oncology “Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy Combos Are the New Standard of Care for NSCLC, Says Konduri” https://www.targetedonc.com/news/immunotherapychemotherapy-combos-are-the-new-standard-of-care-for-nsclc-says-konduri OncLive “Dr. Jotte on the Optimal Frequency of Lung Cancer Screening” https://www.onclive.com/onclive-tv/dr-jotte-on-the-optimal-frequency-of-lung-cancer-screening Targeted Oncology “Immunotherapy Combinations Are Changing the Frontline Treatment of Patients With NSCLC” https://www.targetedonc.com/publications/targeted-therapy-news/2018/August-2018/immunotherapy-combinations-are-changing-the-frontline-treatment-of-patients-with-nsclc Cancer Therapy Advisor “Heterogeneity of Drug Resistance in EGFR-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer” https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/lung-cancer/lung-cancer-nsclc-heterogeneity-drug-resistance-egfr/article/786470/ Speciality Pharmacy Times First Checkpoint Inhibitor for Previously Treated Patients with SCLC Approved by FDA https://www.specialtypharmacytimes.com/news/first-checkpoint-inhibitor-for-previously-treated-patients-with-sclc-approved-by-fda
  3. Here is the weekly clip report: Cure “Lung Cancer Care Becoming More Personalized and Trials will Too” https://www.curetoday.com/articles/lung-cancer-care-becoming-more-personalized-and-trials-will-too Cancer Therapy Advisor “Lurbinectedin Receives FDA Orphan Drug Status for Recurrent Small-Cell Lung Cancer” https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/lung-cancer/lung-cancer-nsclc-lurbinecedin-fda-oprhan-drug-status-treatment/article/786009/ U.S. News – Health “What to Know about Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines” https://www.nga.org/governors/addresses/ Healio “Minimally Invasive Surgery Effective for Early-Stage Lung Cancer” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/lung-cancer/news/in-the-journals/{924a7fc0-fcda-4ffb-bad7-4f2cb101c1db}/minimally-invasive-surgery-effective-for-early-stage-lung-cancer Onc Live “Dr. Witsuba on Biomarkers for Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer” https://www.onclive.com/onclive-tv/dr-wistuba-on-biomarkers-for-immunotherapy-in-lung-cancer Drug Target Review “Reducing NOVA1 Helps prevents Tumour Growth in Lung Cancer” https://www.drugtargetreview.com/news/34089/reducing-nova1-lung-cancer/ Science Daily “Finally, a Potential New Approach against KRAS-Driven Lung Cancer” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180809093458.htm Oncology Nurse Advisor “New PDL1 Inhibitors for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Focus on Pembrolizumab” https://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/lung-cancer/pdl1-inhibitors-for-nsclc-focus-on-pembrolizumab/article/787627/
  4. Here is the weekly clip report: U.S. News & World Report "From the 'Big C' to Cancer" https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-03-21/from-the-big-c-to-cancer Healio “Lower-Limb Arterial Thrombosis May Be Marker of Cancer” https://www.healio.com/cardiac-vascular-intervention/peripheral/news/online/{f342b55f-87eb-4edc-a0eb-608633079467}/lower-limb-arterial-thrombosis-may-be-marker-of-cancer Medscape “How to Improve Diversification of Patients with Cancer in Clinical Trials” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/894210 Oncology Nursing News "New Treatments for Lesser-Known Targets in NSCLC Are Emerging" http://www.oncnursingnews.com/web-exclusives/new-treatments-for-lesserknown-targets-in-nsclc-are-emerging Smithsonian Magazine “Could Immunotherapy Lead the Way to Fighting Cancer?” https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/immunotherapy-lead-way-fighting-cancer-180968392/ Medscape “From ALK to T790M: The Role of Liquid Biopsy in Lung Cancer” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/894215 Medical Xpress “RNA-Based Therapeutic Inhibits a Metabolic Pathway in Tumor-Initiating Lung Cancer Cells” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-03-rna-based-therapeutic-inhibits-metabolic-pathway.html Bloomberg “Robots Could Replace Surgeons in the Battle Against Cancer” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-03-23/robots-could-replace-surgeons-in-the-battle-against-cancer
  5. LUNGevity is proud to announce that the Foundation is serving on three subcommittees of Sustainable Healthy Communities, LLC, founded by the National Minority Quality Forum. As one of two US patient advocacy organizations on the Diverse Cancer Communities Working Group (CWG), LUNGevity will bring years of expertise in supporting the lung cancer community to the Cancer Index Subcommittee, the Community and Patient Engagement Subcommittee, and the Diversity in Clinical Research Subcommittee. “We are proud to work with LUNGevity on the Cancer Working Group, given the importance of always asking for and listening to the patient point of view,” said Jeanne M. Regnante, Chair of the CWG. The overarching goal of the Working Group is to ‘spotlight existing inequities in order to identify and deliver solutions to eliminate barriers to lung cancer screening, referral to appropriate healthcare providers, access to treatment, care, support and inclusive cancer research for all.’ Members of the SHC Working Group include national leaders in pharmaceuticals, government, academia, patient advocacy organizations and life sciences. “We’re especially honored to be working with SHC and its partners on eliminating disparities in detection and treatment for cancer patients,” said Andrea Ferris, CEO of LUNGevity. “To achieve our vision of a world where no one dies of lung cancer, we continually strive to identify unreached populations and supply them with information and tools they need to improve their access to care.” Ms. Ferris will be a speaker at the 2018 NMQF Leadership Summit on Health Disparities and Spring Health Braintrust in Washington, DC this April. She and Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH, LUNGevity Director of Translational Research Program/Director of Patient FoRCe, will represent the Foundation on the three subcommittees and all future initiatives. Click here to read the full press release.
  6. Hi, SMAs, Here is the weekly clip report: Healio “Targeted Radiation Reduces Mortality for Early-Stage Lung Cancer” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/lung-cancer/news/in-the-journals/{ea2da7d0-cbee-4aba-bba7-5028dde05d69}/targeted-radiation-reduces-mortality-for-early-stage-lung-cancer OncLive “ALK Inhibitors Continue to Reshape Treatment in NSCLC” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/alk-inhibitors-continue-to-reshape-treatment-in-nsclc U.S. News & World Report “Are More People Dying of Cancer?” https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-02-20/are-more-people-dying-of-cancer Women’s Health “’How I Told My Siblings I Had Lung Cancer’” https://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/a18377542/lung-cancer-diagnosis/ OncLive “Clinical Trials Highlight Biomarker Progress in Lung Cancer” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/clinical-trials-highlight-biomarker-progress-in-lung-cancer Clinical Oncology “Imfinzi Granted New Indication to Reduce Risk for NSCLC Progression” http://www.clinicaloncology.com/FDA-Watch/Article/02-18/Imfinzi-Granted-New-Indication-to-Reduce-Risk-for-NSCLC-Progression/47007 OncLive “Larotrectinib Update Shows Durable Responses in TRK-Positive Cancers” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/larotrectinib-update-shows-durable-responses-in-trkpositive-cancers Cancer Therapy Advisor “Phase 2 Trial of AZD1775 for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer” https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/lung-cancer/azd1775-squamous-cell-lung-cancer-phase-2-trial/article/746115/ BBC News “Mini-Tumors’ Created to Battle Cancer” http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43154878 Medical Xpress “An Under-the-Radar Immune Cell Shows Potential in Fight Against Cancer” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-under-the-radar-immune-cell-potential-cancer.html GenomeWeb “New Extracellular Particle Could Prove Useful for Cancer Diagnosis, Monitoring” https://www.genomeweb.com/proteomics-protein-research/new-extracellular-particle-could-prove-useful-cancer-diagnosis
  7. Here is the weekly clip report: USA Today “Bristol-Myers Squibb Claims ‘Breakthrough’ Lung Cancer Treatment” https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/02/05/bristol-myers-squibb-claims-breakthrough-lung-cancer-treatment/306433002/ Forbes “Genprex Launch IPO for Trials of New Gene Therapy Lung Cancer Treatment” https://www.forbes.com/sites/rodnturner/2018/02/05/genprex-launch-ipo-for-trials-of-new-gene-therapy-lung-cancer-treatment/#167f00d449fd Cure Today “Not All Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment is Equal” https://www.curetoday.com/articles/not-all-small-cell-lung-cancer-treatment-is-equal Targeted Oncology “Gray Sheds Light on Considerations When Treating NSCLC with Immunotherapy” http://www.targetedonc.com/news/gray-sheds-light-on-considerations-when-treating-nsclc-with-immunotherapy Oncology Nurse Advisor “Lung Cancer Screening: Risk-Targeting Approach vs NLST Eligibility Criteria” https://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/lung-cancer/risk-targeting-approach-vs-national-lung-screening-trial-eligibility-criteria/article/741924/ OncLive “Dr. Erhunmwunsee on Factors of Disparity in Lung Cancer Treatment” http://www.onclive.com/onclive-tv/dr-erhunmwunsee-on-factors-of-disparity-in-lung-cancer-treatment News Medical “LUNGevity Foundation Launches Initiative to Promote Stronger Adherence to Lung Cancer Screening” https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180207/LUNGevity-Foundation-launches-initiative-to-promote-stronger-adherence-to-lung-cancer-screening.aspx Healio “ASCO Panel: Precision Medicine in Practice Can Be Challenging” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/practice-management/news/online/{29cffa20-1d9b-41e1-84e1-804341997d73}/asco-panel-precision-medicine-in-practice-can-be-challenging The Daily Telescope “Dr. Julie Brahmer, M.D., M.Sc. Is Named Professional of the Year by the International Assoc. of Who’s Who” http://dailytelescope.com/pr/dr-julie-r-brahmer-m-d-m-sc-is-named-professional-of-the-year-by-the-international-assoc-of-whoaes-who/66790 UCLA Health “A Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings” https://www.uclahealth.org/u-magazine/body.cfm?id=17&action=detail&ref=1137 NPR “What Not to Say to the Terminally Ill: ‘Everything Happens for a Reason’” https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/08/583774624/what-not-to-say-to-the-terminally-ill-everything-happens-for-a-reason
  8. Here is the weekly clip report: PR Newswire “American College of Chest Physicians Publishes New Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines” https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/american-college-of-chest-physicians-publishes-new-lung-cancer-screening-guidelines-300589650.html The ASCO Post “Durvalumab Takes a Giant Leap into Stage III NSCLC” http://www.ascopost.com/issues/january-25-2018/durvalumab-takes-a-giant-leap-into-stage-iii-nsclc/ EurekAlert! “New Radiation Techniques Could Improve Quality of Life for Lung Cancer Patients” https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/lhri-nrt012918.php Medical Xpress “Expert Panel Issues New Guidelines for Lung Cancer Molecular Testing” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-01-expert-panel-issues-guidelines-lung.html KETV-TV “Radon Awareness Month: Lung Cancer Survivor Thinks Radon Caused It” http://www.ketv.com/article/radon-awareness-month-lung-cancer-survivor-thinks-radon-caused-it/15893580 Oncology Nursing News “Socioeconomic Disparity in Lung Cancer Care” http://www.oncnursingnews.com/web-exclusives/socioeconomic-disparity-in-lung-cancer-care OncLive “Treatment of Locally Advanced NSCLC” http://www.onclive.com/insights/multimodal-advanced-nsclc/treatment-of-locally-advanced-nsclc OncLive “Treatment of Early-Stage NSCLC” http://www.onclive.com/insights/multimodal-advanced-nsclc/treatment-of-early-stage-nsclc Cure Today “Who Wears the Face of Cancer?” https://www.curetoday.com/community/bonnie-annis/2018/01/who-wears-the-face-of-cancer Pittsburgh Post-Gazette “LUNGevity Foundation Announces Initiative to Save Lives Through Increased Adherence to Lung Cancer Screening” http://markets.post-gazette.com/postgazette/news/read/35699542/lungevity_foundation_announces_initiative_to_save_lives_through_increased_adherence_to_lung_cancer_screening EurekAlert! “Small Molecule Plays a Big Role in Reducing Cancer’s Spread” https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/mcog-smp013018.php KIMT-TV “Lung Cancer Survivor Heads to Super Bowl 52” http://www.kimt.com/content/news/Lung-cancer-survivor-heads-to-Super-Bowl-52-471847253.html The New York Times “After a Cancer Diagnosis, Playing the Odds” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/31/well/live/after-a-cancer-diagnosis-playing-the-odds.html Targeted Oncology “Will Combination Therapy with Immunotherapy Become the New Standard of Care for NSCLC?” http://www.targetedonc.com/news/will-combination-therapies-with-immunotherapy-become-the-new-standard-of-care-for-nsclc MIT News “Fine-Tuning Cancer Medicine” http://news.mit.edu/2018/fine-tuning-cancer-medicine-0201 Medical Xpress “Early Access to Palliative Care Associated with Better Quality of Life” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-early-access-palliative-quality-life.html Medical Xpress “Clinical Trial Tests Feasibility of Targeting Particular Classes of Tumor Types with Certain Drugs” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-clinical-trial-feasibility-classes-tumor.html
  9. LUNGevity Foundation announced the launch of Project ACTS – Increasing Adherence to CT Screening for lung cancer – a multi-stakeholder project funded by a grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation through their Bridging Cancer CareTM initiative. Project ACTS will develop and evaluate tools to promote stronger adherence to lung cancer screening protocols so that patients can fully benefit from potentially lifesaving CT screening. Since 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that people at high risk for lung cancer obtain a low-dose CT scan to detect lung cancer early, when it is most treatable. Currently, there are more than 1,600 American College of Radiology-accredited lung cancer screening centers in the US. However, studies indicate that as many as 45% of screening program participants may not receive appropriate follow-up after an abnormal scan. Through a multi-pronged approach including qualitative studies and the development and testing of engagement tools, Project ACTS seeks to increase the number of individuals who benefit from CT screening-based early detection, thereby saving thousands of lives. Andrea Ferris, CEO of LUNGevity, said, “We are excited to further advance our focus on early detection by creating tools to ensure patients come back for a follow-up scan. The National Lung Screening Trial paved the way to make CT screening available to individuals at high risk for lung cancer. Project ACTS complements the efforts of fellow lung cancer groups, such as the Lung Cancer Alliance, which are setting up Screening Centers of Excellence throughout the country. We thank Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation for funding this program, which will save lives.” The project is a collaborative effort between LUNGevity Foundation and health psychologist Dr. Jamie Studts from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and health economist Dr. Margaret Byrne from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL. “With Project ACTS, the investigative team will develop and begin to test an intervention toolkit that lung cancer screening programs can use to reduce non-adherence, an emerging challenge that could compromise the potential benefits of lung cancer screening on population health,” said Studts. The study team also includes world-renowned pulmonologists Dr. Pierre Massion from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and Dr. Peter Mazzone from Cleveland Clinic Foundation as clinician advisors. It is expected to start by the beginning of February 2018 and will involve the development of patient engagement tools that will provide accurate information about screening results and help individuals have meaningful discussions with their healthcare providers after their first CT scan, with the goal of supporting their efforts to return for follow-up scans. “Lack of adherence to screening protocols can have dramatic effects for individuals who could have had disease detected at an earlier, more treatable stage,” said John Damonti, President of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation. “Project ACTS will address the patient engagement challenge to increase adherence to follow-up scans for high risk individuals. We are proud of what this partnership’s work will do to support patients in benefitting from potentially lifesaving screening.” Read the full press release here.
  10. Here is the weekly clip report: The ASCO Post “Stand Up To Cancer Launches ‘Cancer Interception’ Teams to Detect and Treat Cancer at Earliest Stages” http://www.ascopost.com/issues/november-25-2017/stand-up-to-cancer-launches-cancer-interception-teams-to-detect-and-treat-cancer-at-earliest-stages/ Stanford Medicine News Center “Stanford Scientists among Those Funded by Stand Up To Cancer” https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2017/11/stanford-scientists-among-those-funded-by-stand-up-to-cancer.html Immuno-Oncology News “Imfinzi Increases Time for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer to Progress, Phase 3 Trial Shows” https://immuno-oncologynews.com/2017/11/28/phase-3-trial-shows-imfinzi-lengthens-time-for-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-to-return/ Targeted Oncology “Ahead of NSCLC Approval Decision, FDA Now Weighing Durvalumab Data in NEJM” http://www.targetedonc.com/news/ahead-of-nsclc-approval-decision-fda-now-weighing-durvalumab-data-in-nejm OncLive “Immunotherapy to Have Emerging Role in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/immunotherapy-to-have-emerging-role-in-squamous-cell-lung-cancer Business Wire “Impassioned Lung Cancer Survivors Join Your Cancer Game Plan, Merck to Advocate for Others Facing This Highly Stigmatized Disease” http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171129005025/en/Impassioned-Lung-Cancer-Survivors-Join-Cancer-Game The Baltimore Sun “Life After Lung Cancer: How One Survivor is Fighting for Others” http://www.baltimoresun.com/bp/blt-ara-31849-life-after-lung-cancer-how-one-survivor-is-fighting-for-others-20171129-adstory.html National Press Club “Life After Cancer: Addressing Survivorship in Cancer Care” http://www.press.org/events/life-after-cancer-addressing-survivorship-cancer-care Markets Insider “Biocept and UC San Diego Medical Center Announce Clinical Study Collaboration to Demonstrate Utility of Biocept’s Liquid Biopsy Test in Immunotherapy” http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Biocept-and-UC-San-Diego-Medical-Center-Announce-Clinical-Study-Collaboration-to-Demonstrate-Utility-of-Biocept-s-Liquid-Biopsy-Test-in-Immunotherapy-1009786790 Medical Xpress “Two-Drug Combination May Boost Immunotherapy Response in Lung Cancer Patients” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-11-two-drug-combination-boost-immunotherapy-responses.html Reuters “FDA Aims to Approve More Drugs Based on Early Clinical Data” https://www.reuters.com/article/us-fda-hearing-testimony/fda-aims-to-approve-more-drugs-based-on-early-clinical-data-idUSKBN1DU2DS Healio “Eight Important Updates in Lung Cancer” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/lung-cancer/news/online/{56102e9b-63d2-4eea-8859-01b452dbe2b3}/eight-important-updates-in-lung-cancer Investor’s Business Daily “This Biotech Launched to a Record High on Cancer Test Approval” https://www.investors.com/news/technology/this-biotech-launched-to-a-record-high-on-cancer-test-approval/ DOD Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs “Melissa Crouse – Lung Cancer Warrior, Mentor and Advocate” http://cdmrp.army.mil/cwg/stories/2017/melissa_crouse_profile Business Wire “FDA Approves Foundation Medicine’s FoundationOne Cdx, the First and Only Comprehensive Genomic Profiling Test for All Solid Tumors Incorporating Multiple Companion Diagnostics” http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171130006320/en/FDA-Approves-Foundation-Medicine’s-FoundationOne-CDx™-Comprehensive Markets Insider “Advocates Reveal Cancer Survivorship Challenges and Resources During National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Patient Advocacy Summit” http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Advocates-Reveal-Cancer-Survivorship-Challenges-and-Resources-during-National-Comprehensive-Cancer-Network-s-Patient-Advocacy-Summit-1010204005
  11. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused organization, announced the funding of two research teams that will focus on lung cancer interception: catching precancerous cells and blocking them from turning into cancer cells. These awards are the first-ever Stand Up To Cancer awards focused on the early detection and interception of lung cancer and build on LUNGevity’s eight-year direct investment in critical early detection lung cancer research. "Finding lung cancer early, when it is most treatable, is a critical step to saving thousands of lives," said Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of LUNGevity, "especially since currently only 15% of patients are diagnosed at this stage. Our long-term strategic focus and investment in finding better ways to detect, diagnose, and now intercept lung cancer in its earliest stages is strengthened by this collaboration with SU2C and the American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE initiative. It is our goal to find noninvasive, widely available diagnostic and early detection tools that will dramatically change outcomes for people with lung cancer.” The interdisciplinary and multi-institutional awards include a Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team, and a Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team. SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team: Intercept Lung Cancer Through Immune, Imaging, & Molecular Evaluation (InTIME) Funding: $5 million Leader: Avrum Spira, MD, professor of medicine, pathology and bioinformatics, and director of the Cancer Center at Boston University-Boston Medical Center Co-leader: Steven Dubinett, MD, associate vice chancellor for research at UCLA and director of the lung cancer research program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center The Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team will develop diagnostic tools, such as nasal swabs, blood tests, and radiological imaging, to confirm whether lung abnormalities found on chest imaging are benign lung disease or lung cancer. To protect against recurrence of disease that has already been successfully treated, new blood tests will help identify patients at the earliest stages of recurrence, enabling timely interventions such as immunotherapy. "We plan to develop technology that can, in a very sensitive way, pick up the small amount of DNA that might be present in the blood of someone who’s harboring a lung cancer deep within their lung tissue – a noninvasive way of measuring a person’s risk of having lung cancer," Dr. Spira said. SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team: Blood-based Early Interception of Lung Cancer Funding: $2 million Leader: Lecia Sequist, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine, and director of the Center for Innovation in Early Cancer Detection (CIECD) at Massachusetts General Hospital Co-leader: Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine The Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team will develop a lung cancer interception assay (LCIA) that can be used in conjunction with low-dose CT scans, based on blood-based assays that examine circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA. After completing pilot testing as part of this Translational Research Grant, the team plans to move the LCIA forward to larger, prospective clinical trials. "It’s extremely frustrating that we’re not technically able to find lung cancer earlier in the majority of patients,” Dr. Sequist said. “We need to change the paradigm that we use to identify patients so that they are found early enough to offer them curative treatment. If we really want to save more lives from lung cancer, we have to exponentially improve our diagnostics." LUNGevity is the only lung cancer nonprofit with a programmatic focus on funding early detection research, to find lung cancer when it is most treatable. Currently, only 15% of people with lung cancer are diagnosed in the earliest stages, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 17.7%. These projects expand on LUNGevity’s eight-year investment in early detection research with the goal of developing an effective, widely available, noninvasive way of finding lung cancer early in all populations. Click here to read the full press release.
  12. The other day, in conversation with a newly minted medical school graduate, he told me low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) was dangerous. Dangerous! If LDCT is dangerous, what is late discovery of lung cancer? He nearly fainted when I told him I had perhaps more than 40 CT scans in my treatment history, telling me I was a candidate for radiation induced cancer. It didn’t seem to register that I was a candidate for extinction by lung cancer. We are told the only effective way of treating our disease is early discovery. Few dispute this point. Why then would the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) want to reduce reimbursement for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening by more than 40 percent? The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is concerned calling LDCT a “game changer in the battle against lung cancer.” Then I read: “Family physicians lack sufficient knowledge about recommendations for LDCT." Moreover, Doctors Patz and Chen, professors of radiology at Duke, say: “Not screening patients annually could save millions in health care costs and spare patients the radiation exposure and downstream effects of false positive screenings.” Something is very wrong. We have an effective tool for early discovery of life-threatening disease when not discovered early, and there is a campaign mounted against using it. CMS is a federal government-funded agency. In government programs there is a big difference between savings (cash you can put in the bank) and avoidance (cash spent elsewhere). CMS money is appropriated in broad categories. Once appropriated, fiscal managers move money around to address other needs or requirements. Appropriated federal funds are almost never returned to the Treasury. So the reduced funding for LDCT will be a bill payer for some other CMS program. No money is saved; it is spent on something else. Further, when making a valid cost avoidance argument, one must identify all cost. For example, the professors of radiology predicting savings for reduced screening do not identify the millions of dollars of increased cost for treating late-stage-diagnosed lung cancer. A cost avoided almost always results in cost added somewhere else, and without disclosing added burden, professionals are making very unprofessional arguments. Lastly, and most importantly, no one advocating reducing LDCT is considering the most important impact—suffering. There is a vast amount with late-stage diagnosis. Suffering affects more than the lung cancer survivor; it devastates families. While real and detrimental, suffering defies quantification in dollars. Several hundreds-of-thousands of us in the United States will suffer a late-stage lung cancer diagnosis this year. LDCT can eliminate some of this. In this light, it is hard to understand the assault against using LDCT to find, fix, and finish lung cancer! Stay the course.
  13. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s preeminent lung cancer research foundation, today announced that Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD, has joined LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 20 world-renowned scientists and researchers that guides LUNGevity’s research program. The Scientific Advisory Board is integral to the Foundation, overseeing the scientific strategy and ensuring that grants are awarded to the researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as extending and improving lives of lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and Career Development Awards. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The research program is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. Dr. Shaw is the Director of the Center for Thoracic Cancers and the Paula O’Keeffe Endowed Chair of Thoracic Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. In addition to caring for patients with lung cancer, Dr. Shaw performs clinical and translational research. Her clinical research focuses on subsets of NSCLC that have unique driver mutations, such as EGFR, ALK, and ROS1. Her translational research focuses on understanding and making clear the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies; she is currently developing novel combination treatment strategies. Her research has helped to develop numerous FDA-approved targeted therapies for patients with oncogene-driven NSCLC, such as crizotinib (Xalkori®) for patients with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements. “We could not be happier that Dr. Shaw has joined our Scientific Advisory Board,” said Andrea Ferris, President and Chairman of LUNGevity Foundation. “She is a brilliant thinker, an innovator, and a compassionate advocate for her patients. In particular, her groundbreaking work that led to the development of Xalkori® has extended and improved the lives of many NSCLC patients. Her expertise and counsel will advance LUNGevity’s goal to increase and improve survivorship for those affected by lung cancer.” Read the full press release here.
  14. LUNGevity Announces Funding Opportunity for First-Ever Lung Cancer Early Detection and Interception Dream Team Call for ideas for SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association collaboration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Linda Wenger [email protected] (973) 449-3214 WASHINGTON, DC (February 6, 2017) – Building on the Foundation’s more than seven years of strategic investment in early detection research, LUNGevity Foundation, in collaboration with Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) and the American Lung Association (through its LUNG FORCE initiative), is pleased to announce that the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), SU2C’s scientific partner, has issued a Call for Ideas for research proposals that focus on lung cancer early detection and interception: catching precancerous cells and blocking them from turning into cancer cells. The interdisciplinary and multi-institutional SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team will be the first of its kind, with up to $7 million in funding support. As Dr. Pierre Massion, Professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt University, points out, "We understand the pathogenesis of lung cancer a lot better now. People have come to recognize that detecting the disease early and preventing it will require efforts between multiple disciplines to get there. The Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team is a huge step toward this goal." Dr. Massion is a member of LUNGevity’s distinguished Scientific Advisory Board and co-chairs the SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association Joint Scientific Advisory Committee (JSAC). LUNGevity is the only lung cancer nonprofit with a programmatic focus on early detection, to find lung cancer when it is most treatable. Currently, only 15% of people with lung cancer are diagnosed in the earliest stages, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 17.7%. This project expands on LUNGevity’s investment in early detection research with the goal of developing an effective, widely available, noninvasive way of finding lung cancer early in all populations. Prioritized areas of interest for this project include research that accurately categorizes premalignant conditions according to risk of progression and that elucidates the underlying alterations that increase that risk; identification of new targets for developing therapeutic interventions of these early lesions; potential surrogate endpoints for clinical trials and regulatory approval; new tools for early detection and monitoring progression; the role of inflammation and immunosuppression in progression; or research targeted at generating sufficient knowledge to justify a clinical intervention to test novel hypotheses. Applicants for the grants are expected to show how their proposed projects will have positive benefit for patients in the near future, achieved through investigation by a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional, synergistic Dream Team of expert investigators. Priority will be given to applications that are characterized by a diversity of team members, including those from fields outside the traditional realms of biomedical research (e.g., physics, mathematics, engineering, health policy, and communications). Specific aims of the project may include basic research, translational studies, and population studies, but the overall proposal must have a strong clinical research component. Program details can be found at https://proposalcentral.altum.com. Letters of Intent are due by March 8, 2017. Read the full press release on LUNGevity's website.
  15. LUNGevity Foundation Issues Request for Applications for 2017 Career Development Awards for Translational Research in Lung Cancer Application now available online FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Austin Courtney [email protected] (202) 414-0791 Washington, D.C. (January 17, 2017) — LUNGevity has issued a Request for Applications (RFA) for translational research for Career Development Awards that will be granted in 2017. The RFA is available on the LUNGevity website at www.LUNGevity.org/career-development-awards and is also posted on the proposalCENTRAL website at https://proposalcentral.altum.com. LUNGevity’s Career Development Awards for Translational Research program was created to support future research leaders who will keep the field of lung cancer research vibrant with new ideas. Successful applicants may receive $100,000 per year for a possible period of three years and will participate as non-voting members of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board for the duration of the award. Applicants must be within the first five years of their faculty appointment. The Career Development Awards are mentored awards, and a mentoring plan is part of the required submission. Projects that will be funded in 2017 are expected to have a direct impact on the early detection of lung cancer or on the outcomes of lung cancer, or to provide a clear conceptual or experimental foundation for the future development of methods for early detection and/or individualized treatment, including through targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Letters of intent must be submitted by Friday, February 20, 2017. LUNGevity supports the largest research awards program of any lung cancer-focused organization in the United States. Since 2002, LUNGevity has funded 118 projects at 58 institutions in 23 states. About Lung Cancer in the U.S. About 1 in 15 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime More than 224,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year About 60%-65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are among people who have never smoked or are former smokers Lung cancer takes more lives than the next four deadliest cancers (colorectal, pancreatic, breast, and prostate) combined Only 18% of all people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive 5 years or more, BUT if it’s caught before it spreads, the chance for 5-year survival improves dramatically About LUNGevity Foundation LUNGevity Foundation is firmly committed to making an immediate impact on increasing quality of life and survivorship of people with lung cancer by accelerating research into early detection and more effective treatments, as well as by providing community, support, and education for all those affected by the disease. Our vision is a world where no one dies of lung cancer. For more information about LUNGevity Foundation, please visit www.LUNGevity.org. Click here to read the full press release online.
  16. My cousin Kathi, who was more like a sister to me, died of lung cancer in December 2003. She was 46 years old. At the time, I didn’t know the first thing about lung cancer. Since Kathi smoked for years, I thought that’s why she got lung cancer. I didn’t think too much more about lung cancer for the next year, although I thought about Kathi every day. Then, about a year later, I had a sharp pain in the right side of my chest, like a knife stabbing through my chest and back. I thought that I might be having a heart attack. I exercised regularly, ate fairly well, and was always concerned about heart disease because my dad had died of a heart attack at age 40 and 3 of my grandparents had died of heart disease. So I knew it ran in my family. My husband took me to the emergency room and after lots and lots of tests, it was determined that my heart was fine, but they found this tiny little mass on my left lung. I was told by my family doctor that it was very possibly lung cancer. But my pain was on the right side…. The tumor was on my left lung. This didn’t make any sense! They never did find out what that pain was. It definitely wasn’t the cancer. All I can say is that somebody was trying to tell me something. If I had not gone to the emergency room that day, my cancer would most likely not have been diagnosed until it was too late, like Kathi. After a pet scan, I was sent to University of Maryland in Baltimore to see a lung cancer specialist. They immediately did a lung biopsy which confirmed their suspicion. It was non small cell lung cancer. How could I have lung cancer? I was only 46, I didn’t smoke, I exercised 5 to 6 times a week, I had regular check ups, I ate well….how could I have lung cancer? I immediately got on the internet and began researching lung cancer. What I saw was very disturbing, to say the least. The only statistic that I could remember from that evening was that 95% of lung cancer patients do not survive more than 5 years! I was just devastated. I wouldn’t be able to see my daughters grow up, I wouldn’t be able to see my grandchildren. Now how was I going to tell my daughters? They had just watched my cousin die of lung cancer! I told my younger daughter first, she was 11 years old at the time. As I looked at her, a fierce feeling of determination came over me. I WILL fight this, and I WILL beat this! I have to. My kids need me and I need them! I explained to her that mine was a different type of lung cancer than Kathi had and that it was found very early, unlike Kathi’s. I was trying to downplay it as much as I could to prevent her from worrying. And it worked. Several months later I was sitting at my desk at home, and she saw a Lung Cancer book on my desk. She came over, picked up the book, read the title and said “Oh Mom, you didn’t even have it that bad!”. My older daughter was away at college at the time, so I called her and asked her to meet me for lunch. She was 20 years old. I explained it to her just like I did to my younger daughter. They both seemed to take it very well. I was then sent for more tests and finally some good news! The cancer had not spread to my lymph nodes. It looked to be contained in one of the two lobes of my left lung. This meant that I was a candidate for surgery, which meant the best chance of a cure! I was diagnosed at Stage 1A. So, on April 20, 2005 I had the upper left lobe of my lung removed at the University of Maryland Medical Center. I was able to have VATS surgery, Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery. The day I came home from the hospital, I tried to walk up the stairs at my house. About half way up, I stopped and couldn’t breathe. I had to sit on the step for about 5 minutes to catch my breath. It was then that I realized that life would probably never be “normal” again. But, I was on the treadmill walking two weeks after surgery and back in spinning classes 4 weeks after surgery. I was determined to get back on that spinning bike and continue like I still had two lungs! The first question people ask me when I tell them that I am a lung cancer survivor is “DID YOU SMOKE?” I think non-smokers ask because they hope I’ll say yes, so they can feel safe. But none of us is “safe”. What’s so awful about that question is that if you are a smoker, you probably feel horrible about it. Almost everyone who smokes wants to quit – the majority of the people started when they were young and got addicted. Anyone who is diagnosed with cancer will ask themselves, “Why Me” and try to figure it out. The thought that you may have brought it on yourself is devastating. Do they deserve the disease because they smoked? NO! No one deserves this horrible disease! Today LC needs to be on the radar screen for everyone, not just people who smoke. I hope in the years to come LC will get the recognition of other cancers, and a cure will be found. I tried to return to my life before cancer, but found it was impossible. My whole world had been shaken and I realized that I would never return to the life I had led before. I was a survivor and I was determined to help other people diagnosed with lung cancer. The best thing that I found on the internet while researching lung cancer, was the Lung Cancer Support Community. It was an on-line community of over 7000 members who had been affected by lung cancer. Some were survivors, some were caregivers, but they were the most caring bunch of people I have ever known, and I certainly needed that. Although I will have to get a CT scan and visit my doctor in Baltimore every year for the rest of my life, it is a small price to pay for saving my life. By far, my biggest challenge has been conquering the fear of recurrence. Some days are almost worry free, others are not. The fear is always there. But I’m proud to say that I am now 10 years cancer free! After 5 years the doctors call you “cured”. What a nice word. I may be cured, but I am still a member of the cancer community and always will be. I will continue to advocate for lung cancer research until we have a reliable early detection method and adequate funding for research so that everyone else can be as lucky as I am!
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