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Found 8 results

  1. Join LUNGevity Foundation for a Twitter chat about Palliative Care: What it is and what it isn't. We'll answer questions and dispel myths about palliative care for lung cancer patients. Be part of the conversation on Wednesday, April 4, at 8:00PM ET. Use #LCCaregiver to join or follow the conversation. For more information about palliative care, visit LUNGevity's Lung Cancer 101 website.
  2. The treatment landscape of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is rapidly evolving, with the development of genetically targeted therapies and immunotherapy. Since 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved nine new drugs for the treatment of NSCLC, three reapprovals, and six new indications for an existing treatment. However, the side effects and toxicities of these treatments can be significant. With the emergence of new treatment options for lung cancer, the complexity of treatment decisions for people living with lung cancer has increased. With these treatment options
  3. If you have been diagnosed with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), you may be able to participate in a survey study. ICON is a global health research company contracted by pharmaceutical companies to conduct research. ICON is looking for U.S. patients to participate in a survey for people who have been diagnosed with metastatic NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the preferences of patients for treatment. This study consists of a one-time online survey that will take about 30 minutes to complete. Participants will receive $30 if they are eligible and
  4. Find A Cure Panel specializes in patient research for rare and serious disease and they have some current research for people and caregivers of people with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). To qualify for this research, you or your loved one with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC): 1) Must have a diagnosis with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). 2) Be over 50 years old. 3) Have EXTENSIVE SCLC. Sometimes referred to as stage 3, stage 4 or metastatic SCLC. 4) Must have some experience with smoking. If you/your loved one NEVER SMOKED then you won’t qualify, unfor
  5. LUNGevity Foundation has launched Patient FoRCe, the first-ever critical bridge to connect the voices of lung cancer patients — a significant population — with health care professionals, regulators, policymakers, and developers of drugs. “Lung cancer is the #1 cancer killer, taking the lives of 157,000 Americans every year. LUNGevity is leading the way in changing the paradigm of cancer treatment ─ from assuming patient wishes to evidence-based conclusions about what patients value,” said LUNGevity Chairman Andrea Stern Ferris. “Through Patient FoRCe, lung cancer patient voices will be heard a
  6. What Not to Say to a Cancer Patient By: Jane E. Brody What do you think is the most commonly asked question of a person who has, or has had, cancer? If you guessed, “How are you?” you got it right. But as caring as those words may seem, they are often not helpful and may even be harmful. At a celebratory family gathering a year after my own cancer treatment, a distant relative asked me just that. I answered, “I’m fine.” She then pressed, “How are you really?” “Really” I was fine, I told her. But what if I hadn’t been? Would I have wanted to launch into a description of bad
  7. Are you a lung cancer survivor? Please participate in this 5-10 minute anonymous survey, and tell us about your preferences for getting information about lung cancer. Your input is extremely important. It will help us better serve the lung cancer community. https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R25QHD7
  8. It’s normal for someone diagnosed with cancer to experience feelings of sadness, fear, anger and grief. It’s when those feelings prevent you from functioning in your everyday life and you feel emotionally paralyzed in your situation for an extended period of time that you need to seek help. Cancer patients experience depression two times more than the general population and studies have shown that mental health and social well-being can affect the success of treatment. Those diagnosed with cancer have life plans that are interrupted, a change in physical activity and ability, role chang
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