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Found 23 results

  1. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization, announced today the recipients of its 2018 Career Development Awards (CDA) for lung cancer research. These coveted awards fund critical lung cancer research projects and offer the recipients world-class mentorship by LUNGevity’s prestigious Scientific Advisory Board. “We are excited to support these exceptionally talented new investigators. Interestingly, all three of these projects involve liquid biopsy-based approaches to detecting and optimizing treatment of lung cancer. These new projects may define new avenues for applying liquid biopsies in the clinical setting,” notes Charles Rudin, MD, PhD, Professor and Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and chair of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board. “We believe that this outstanding group of awardees will help make progress in improving outcomes for lung cancer patients.” LUNGevity is proud to support the following 2018 Career Development Award researchers: Kellie Smith, PhD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Immunometabolic T cell profiling as a prognostic liquid biopsy in non-small cell lung cancer. Dr. Smith’s research group will work to develop a liquid biopsy that predicts advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patient responses to combination immunotherapy regimens. Jeffrey Thompson, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Development of markers to predict response to immunotherapy in NSCLC. Dr. Thompson’s laboratory is working to develop blood-based tests to identify individuals most likely to respond to immunotherapy with minimum side effects, helping to ensure customized immunotherapies for advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. Edwin Yau, MD, PhD, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Lung cancer detection by CRISPR-based detection of circulating tumor DNA. Dr. Yau’s team is developing a quick and cost-effective blood test for early detection of lung cancer that will complement CT screening. “By funding young investigators, LUNGevity keeps outstanding scientists, still early in their careers, in the lung cancer space. We work closely with these researchers with the hope of seeing them become the next generation of scientific superstars,” says Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of LUNGevity. “The CDA program encourages their continued development in the field of lung cancer research to grow a strong pipeline of dedicated lung cancer researchers.” Under the stewardship of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 21 prominent scientists and researchers, LUNGevity ensures that grants are awarded to those researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as for extending and improving lives of lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and a robust Career Development Award Program. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The foundation’s overall research program, including CDA awards, is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. LUNGevity’s Scientific Research Program is supported by individual donors, the American Lung Association, Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Thomas G. Labrecque Foundation, Upstage Lung Cancer, and the Schmidt Legacy Foundation. Read the full press release.
  2. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization, is pleased to announce the launch of a new lung cancer awareness campaign – 234. The 234 social media campaign utilizes graphic animation to engage the public in understanding the true facts about lung cancer. Approximately 234,000 Americans are diagnosed with lung cancer every year, 422 people die of lung cancer every day, and lung cancer kills more people than the next 3 deadliest cancers combined. The campaign encourages the public to get engaged to make a difference (be the 1). “Our goal with the 234 campaign is to educate the general public about the significant incidence and impact of lung cancer,” said Andrea Ferris, President of LUNGevity Foundation. “We are looking to motivate people to take action and engage others in our effort to drive change.” One in 16 Americans will have a lung cancer diagnosis in their lifetime. Nearly 65% of new diagnoses are in nonsmokers, most often found late when the disease is stage 3 or 4 and more difficult to treat. Just a few years ago, late-stage patients had few treatment options. Today, due to accelerated advancements in research, this is changing, and many late-stage patients are living longer and better lives. We need to continue to accelerate investments in research to save lives. The campaign will run through July as part of LUNGevity’s ongoing efforts to engage new audiences to improve public health. The video may be viewed on the homepage of our website at www.LUNGevity.org. Read the full press release here.
  3. LUNGevity is proud to announce that the Foundation is serving on three subcommittees of Sustainable Healthy Communities, LLC, founded by the National Minority Quality Forum. As one of two US patient advocacy organizations on the Diverse Cancer Communities Working Group (CWG), LUNGevity will bring years of expertise in supporting the lung cancer community to the Cancer Index Subcommittee, the Community and Patient Engagement Subcommittee, and the Diversity in Clinical Research Subcommittee. “We are proud to work with LUNGevity on the Cancer Working Group, given the importance of always asking for and listening to the patient point of view,” said Jeanne M. Regnante, Chair of the CWG. The overarching goal of the Working Group is to ‘spotlight existing inequities in order to identify and deliver solutions to eliminate barriers to lung cancer screening, referral to appropriate healthcare providers, access to treatment, care, support and inclusive cancer research for all.’ Members of the SHC Working Group include national leaders in pharmaceuticals, government, academia, patient advocacy organizations and life sciences. “We’re especially honored to be working with SHC and its partners on eliminating disparities in detection and treatment for cancer patients,” said Andrea Ferris, CEO of LUNGevity. “To achieve our vision of a world where no one dies of lung cancer, we continually strive to identify unreached populations and supply them with information and tools they need to improve their access to care.” Ms. Ferris will be a speaker at the 2018 NMQF Leadership Summit on Health Disparities and Spring Health Braintrust in Washington, DC this April. She and Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH, LUNGevity Director of Translational Research Program/Director of Patient FoRCe, will represent the Foundation on the three subcommittees and all future initiatives. Click here to read the full press release.
  4. LUNGevity Foundation announced the launch of Project ACTS – Increasing Adherence to CT Screening for lung cancer – a multi-stakeholder project funded by a grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation through their Bridging Cancer CareTM initiative. Project ACTS will develop and evaluate tools to promote stronger adherence to lung cancer screening protocols so that patients can fully benefit from potentially lifesaving CT screening. Since 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that people at high risk for lung cancer obtain a low-dose CT scan to detect lung cancer early, when it is most treatable. Currently, there are more than 1,600 American College of Radiology-accredited lung cancer screening centers in the US. However, studies indicate that as many as 45% of screening program participants may not receive appropriate follow-up after an abnormal scan. Through a multi-pronged approach including qualitative studies and the development and testing of engagement tools, Project ACTS seeks to increase the number of individuals who benefit from CT screening-based early detection, thereby saving thousands of lives. Andrea Ferris, CEO of LUNGevity, said, “We are excited to further advance our focus on early detection by creating tools to ensure patients come back for a follow-up scan. The National Lung Screening Trial paved the way to make CT screening available to individuals at high risk for lung cancer. Project ACTS complements the efforts of fellow lung cancer groups, such as the Lung Cancer Alliance, which are setting up Screening Centers of Excellence throughout the country. We thank Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation for funding this program, which will save lives.” The project is a collaborative effort between LUNGevity Foundation and health psychologist Dr. Jamie Studts from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and health economist Dr. Margaret Byrne from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL. “With Project ACTS, the investigative team will develop and begin to test an intervention toolkit that lung cancer screening programs can use to reduce non-adherence, an emerging challenge that could compromise the potential benefits of lung cancer screening on population health,” said Studts. The study team also includes world-renowned pulmonologists Dr. Pierre Massion from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and Dr. Peter Mazzone from Cleveland Clinic Foundation as clinician advisors. It is expected to start by the beginning of February 2018 and will involve the development of patient engagement tools that will provide accurate information about screening results and help individuals have meaningful discussions with their healthcare providers after their first CT scan, with the goal of supporting their efforts to return for follow-up scans. “Lack of adherence to screening protocols can have dramatic effects for individuals who could have had disease detected at an earlier, more treatable stage,” said John Damonti, President of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation. “Project ACTS will address the patient engagement challenge to increase adherence to follow-up scans for high risk individuals. We are proud of what this partnership’s work will do to support patients in benefitting from potentially lifesaving screening.” Read the full press release here.
  5. LUNGevity has issued a Request for Applications (RFA) for translational research for Career Development Awards that will be granted in 2018. The RFA is available on the LUNGevity website at http://www.LUNGevity.org/CDA-RFA and is also posted on the proposalCENTRAL website at https://proposalcentral.altum.com. LUNGevity’s Career Development Awards for Translational Research program was created to support future research leaders who will keep the field of lung cancer research vibrant with new ideas. Successful applicants may receive $100,000 per year for a possible period of three years and will participate as non-voting members of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board for the duration of the award. Applicants must be within the first five years of their first faculty appointment. The Career Development Awards are mentored awards, and a mentoring plan is part of the required submission. “Our Career Development Award Program is in its seventh year, and we are excited to solicit yet another round of high-quality research proposals from the next generation of lung cancer researchers. Past awardees have already gone on to become independent investigators conducting impactful research focused on improving the outcomes for people living with lung cancer,” noted Dr. Upal Basu Roy, Director of LUNGevity’s Translational Science Research Program. Projects that will be funded in 2018 are expected to have a direct impact on the early detection of lung cancer or on the outcomes of lung cancer, or to provide a clear conceptual or experimental foundation for the future development of methods for early detection and/or individualized treatment, including through targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Letters of intent must be submitted by Tuesday, February 20, 2018. LUNGevity supports the largest research awards program of any lung cancer-focused organization in the United States. Since 2002, LUNGevity has funded 121 projects at 58 institutions in 23 states. Read the full press release here.
  6. If you have been diagnosed with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), you may be able to participate in a survey study. ICON is a global health research company contracted by pharmaceutical companies to conduct research. ICON is looking for U.S. patients to participate in a survey for people who have been diagnosed with metastatic NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the preferences of patients for treatment. This study consists of a one-time online survey that will take about 30 minutes to complete. Participants will receive $30 if they are eligible and complete the entire survey. If you are interested in participating in this survey, please visit: http://survey.euro.confirmit.com/wix/p1860621515.aspx This survey has been approved for posting by LUNGevity.
  7. Here is the weekly clip report: The ASCO Post “Stand Up To Cancer Launches ‘Cancer Interception’ Teams to Detect and Treat Cancer at Earliest Stages” http://www.ascopost.com/issues/november-25-2017/stand-up-to-cancer-launches-cancer-interception-teams-to-detect-and-treat-cancer-at-earliest-stages/ Stanford Medicine News Center “Stanford Scientists among Those Funded by Stand Up To Cancer” https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2017/11/stanford-scientists-among-those-funded-by-stand-up-to-cancer.html Immuno-Oncology News “Imfinzi Increases Time for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer to Progress, Phase 3 Trial Shows” https://immuno-oncologynews.com/2017/11/28/phase-3-trial-shows-imfinzi-lengthens-time-for-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-to-return/ Targeted Oncology “Ahead of NSCLC Approval Decision, FDA Now Weighing Durvalumab Data in NEJM” http://www.targetedonc.com/news/ahead-of-nsclc-approval-decision-fda-now-weighing-durvalumab-data-in-nejm OncLive “Immunotherapy to Have Emerging Role in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer” http://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/immunotherapy-to-have-emerging-role-in-squamous-cell-lung-cancer Business Wire “Impassioned Lung Cancer Survivors Join Your Cancer Game Plan, Merck to Advocate for Others Facing This Highly Stigmatized Disease” http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171129005025/en/Impassioned-Lung-Cancer-Survivors-Join-Cancer-Game The Baltimore Sun “Life After Lung Cancer: How One Survivor is Fighting for Others” http://www.baltimoresun.com/bp/blt-ara-31849-life-after-lung-cancer-how-one-survivor-is-fighting-for-others-20171129-adstory.html National Press Club “Life After Cancer: Addressing Survivorship in Cancer Care” http://www.press.org/events/life-after-cancer-addressing-survivorship-cancer-care Markets Insider “Biocept and UC San Diego Medical Center Announce Clinical Study Collaboration to Demonstrate Utility of Biocept’s Liquid Biopsy Test in Immunotherapy” http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Biocept-and-UC-San-Diego-Medical-Center-Announce-Clinical-Study-Collaboration-to-Demonstrate-Utility-of-Biocept-s-Liquid-Biopsy-Test-in-Immunotherapy-1009786790 Medical Xpress “Two-Drug Combination May Boost Immunotherapy Response in Lung Cancer Patients” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-11-two-drug-combination-boost-immunotherapy-responses.html Reuters “FDA Aims to Approve More Drugs Based on Early Clinical Data” https://www.reuters.com/article/us-fda-hearing-testimony/fda-aims-to-approve-more-drugs-based-on-early-clinical-data-idUSKBN1DU2DS Healio “Eight Important Updates in Lung Cancer” https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/lung-cancer/news/online/{56102e9b-63d2-4eea-8859-01b452dbe2b3}/eight-important-updates-in-lung-cancer Investor’s Business Daily “This Biotech Launched to a Record High on Cancer Test Approval” https://www.investors.com/news/technology/this-biotech-launched-to-a-record-high-on-cancer-test-approval/ DOD Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs “Melissa Crouse – Lung Cancer Warrior, Mentor and Advocate” http://cdmrp.army.mil/cwg/stories/2017/melissa_crouse_profile Business Wire “FDA Approves Foundation Medicine’s FoundationOne Cdx, the First and Only Comprehensive Genomic Profiling Test for All Solid Tumors Incorporating Multiple Companion Diagnostics” http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171130006320/en/FDA-Approves-Foundation-Medicine’s-FoundationOne-CDx™-Comprehensive Markets Insider “Advocates Reveal Cancer Survivorship Challenges and Resources During National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Patient Advocacy Summit” http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Advocates-Reveal-Cancer-Survivorship-Challenges-and-Resources-during-National-Comprehensive-Cancer-Network-s-Patient-Advocacy-Summit-1010204005
  8. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused organization, announced the funding of two research teams that will focus on lung cancer interception: catching precancerous cells and blocking them from turning into cancer cells. These awards are the first-ever Stand Up To Cancer awards focused on the early detection and interception of lung cancer and build on LUNGevity’s eight-year direct investment in critical early detection lung cancer research. "Finding lung cancer early, when it is most treatable, is a critical step to saving thousands of lives," said Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of LUNGevity, "especially since currently only 15% of patients are diagnosed at this stage. Our long-term strategic focus and investment in finding better ways to detect, diagnose, and now intercept lung cancer in its earliest stages is strengthened by this collaboration with SU2C and the American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE initiative. It is our goal to find noninvasive, widely available diagnostic and early detection tools that will dramatically change outcomes for people with lung cancer.” The interdisciplinary and multi-institutional awards include a Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team, and a Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team. SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team: Intercept Lung Cancer Through Immune, Imaging, & Molecular Evaluation (InTIME) Funding: $5 million Leader: Avrum Spira, MD, professor of medicine, pathology and bioinformatics, and director of the Cancer Center at Boston University-Boston Medical Center Co-leader: Steven Dubinett, MD, associate vice chancellor for research at UCLA and director of the lung cancer research program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center The Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team will develop diagnostic tools, such as nasal swabs, blood tests, and radiological imaging, to confirm whether lung abnormalities found on chest imaging are benign lung disease or lung cancer. To protect against recurrence of disease that has already been successfully treated, new blood tests will help identify patients at the earliest stages of recurrence, enabling timely interventions such as immunotherapy. "We plan to develop technology that can, in a very sensitive way, pick up the small amount of DNA that might be present in the blood of someone who’s harboring a lung cancer deep within their lung tissue – a noninvasive way of measuring a person’s risk of having lung cancer," Dr. Spira said. SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team: Blood-based Early Interception of Lung Cancer Funding: $2 million Leader: Lecia Sequist, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine, and director of the Center for Innovation in Early Cancer Detection (CIECD) at Massachusetts General Hospital Co-leader: Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine The Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team will develop a lung cancer interception assay (LCIA) that can be used in conjunction with low-dose CT scans, based on blood-based assays that examine circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA. After completing pilot testing as part of this Translational Research Grant, the team plans to move the LCIA forward to larger, prospective clinical trials. "It’s extremely frustrating that we’re not technically able to find lung cancer earlier in the majority of patients,” Dr. Sequist said. “We need to change the paradigm that we use to identify patients so that they are found early enough to offer them curative treatment. If we really want to save more lives from lung cancer, we have to exponentially improve our diagnostics." LUNGevity is the only lung cancer nonprofit with a programmatic focus on funding early detection research, to find lung cancer when it is most treatable. Currently, only 15% of people with lung cancer are diagnosed in the earliest stages, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 17.7%. These projects expand on LUNGevity’s eight-year investment in early detection research with the goal of developing an effective, widely available, noninvasive way of finding lung cancer early in all populations. Click here to read the full press release.
  9. Find A Cure Panel specializes in patient research for rare and serious disease and they have some current research for people and caregivers of people with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). To qualify for this research, you or your loved one with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC): 1) Must have a diagnosis with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). 2) Be over 50 years old. 3) Have EXTENSIVE SCLC. Sometimes referred to as stage 3, stage 4 or metastatic SCLC. 4) Must have some experience with smoking. If you/your loved one NEVER SMOKED then you won’t qualify, unfortunately. 5) If you are a caregiver, you must be knowledgeable about your loved one’s condition and treatment. 6) If you are a caregiver who recently lost your loved one with SCLC, you can still participate if you lost your loved one in the last 12 months. It is easy to participate in. It’s one confidential and anonymous phone call with one moderator talking about your experience with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). If you are interested in participating, please contact FACP at [email protected] and reference FACP/SCLC
  10. This organization is looking for people who are willing to share their opinions about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. They are looking to speak with patients (ages 18-80) and caregivers with Stage III or IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Qualified participants will be compensated $100 (Telephone Interview) OR $150 (Focus Group) for their time and opinion. Anyone who is interested can email [email protected] to see if they are a good fit for the interviews! Please see the attached flyer for complete information. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer _ Flyer.pdf
  11. September 14 is the National Day of Action for Medical Research! The purpose of the Rally for Medical Research and the National Day of Action is to call on our nation's policymakers from all 50 states to make funding for National Institutes of Health (NIH) a national priority and raise awareness about the importance of continued investment in medical research that leads to MORE PROGRESS, MORE HOPE and MORE LIVES SAVED. Aside from supporting lifesaving research, NIH funding sustains a vibrant and innovative 21st century U.S. economy and supports jobs. Thanks to the $2 billion increase to the NIH budget that Congress approved for FY 2016, the U.S. saw an additional economic gain from investing in the NIH of $4 billion compared to 2015. In 2016, NIH funding and jobs generated by that funding produced $64.799 billion in new economic activity compared to $60.717 billion in 2015. Nineteen states saw an economic gain of $1 billion or more. Click here for more information and to register.
  12. LUNGevity Foundation's Career Development Awards (CDA) for lung cancer research fund critical lung cancer research projects and offer the recipients world-class mentorship by LUNGevity’s prestigious Scientific Advisory Board. “LUNGevity created the CDAs to identify outstanding scientists early in their careers and encourage their continued development in the field of lung cancer research to grow a strong pipeline of dedicated lung cancer researchers,” says Charles Rudin, MD, PhD, Professor and Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and chair of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board. “We work closely with these researchers with the hope of seeing them become the next generation of scientific superstars.” LUNGevity is proud to support the following researchers its 2017 Career Development Awards: Mehmet Altan, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Identification of predictive markers of toxicity to immunotherapy. Dr. Altan will work to develop a way to predict which patients are most likely to develop serious side effects from some types of immunotherapy – these side effects can limit use of the treatments. Once patients can be flagged as high-risk for tissue damage, measures can be taken to limit the tissue damage proactively; patients may then experience better outcomes with their immunotherapy. Valsamo Anagnostou, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Dynamics of neoantigen landscape during immunotherapy in lung cancer. Dr. Anagnostou will leverage an existing clinical trial to discover why some patients become resistant to immunotherapy and to get a handle on how to help them overcome the resistance. Zofia Piotrowska, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Overcoming heterogeneity and resistance in EGFR-mutant NSCLC. Dr. Piotrowska intends to uncover the reason a subset of lung cancer patients develop resistance to their best option for treatment: a third-generation EGFR-blocking tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug. In addition, she will study a new combination of drugs in a clinical trial that may help patients who develop this type of drug resistance. “We have seen a lot of great progress in treating lung cancer, and we still need to better understand how lung cancer develops resistance to drugs, and why some patients experience side effects from treatment,” notes Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH, director of LUNGevity’s translational science research program. “Our funding this year’s group of awardees will help make progress in facing these challenges and continue to improve outcomes for lung cancer patients.” Each of these prestigious three-year awards is for $100,000 per year, renewable in the second and third years based on research progress. Awardees serve as non-voting members of LUNGevity’s distinguished Scientific Advisory Board for the terms of their awards. Awardees are mentored by senior lung cancer experts at their own institutions as well as by experts from the Scientific Advisory Board. Under the guidance of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 21 prominent scientists and researchers, LUNGevity ensures that grants are awarded to the researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as extending and improving lives for lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and a robust Career Development Award Program. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The foundation’s overall research program, including CDA awards, is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. LUNGevity’s Scientific Research Program is supported by the American Lung Association, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech, The Thomas G. Labrecque Foundation, Upstage Lung Cancer, and individual donors. Read the full press release.
  13. LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s preeminent lung cancer research foundation, today announced that Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD, has joined LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 20 world-renowned scientists and researchers that guides LUNGevity’s research program. The Scientific Advisory Board is integral to the Foundation, overseeing the scientific strategy and ensuring that grants are awarded to the researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as extending and improving lives of lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with a programmatic focus on early detection and Career Development Awards. Our researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The research program is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. Dr. Shaw is the Director of the Center for Thoracic Cancers and the Paula O’Keeffe Endowed Chair of Thoracic Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. In addition to caring for patients with lung cancer, Dr. Shaw performs clinical and translational research. Her clinical research focuses on subsets of NSCLC that have unique driver mutations, such as EGFR, ALK, and ROS1. Her translational research focuses on understanding and making clear the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies; she is currently developing novel combination treatment strategies. Her research has helped to develop numerous FDA-approved targeted therapies for patients with oncogene-driven NSCLC, such as crizotinib (Xalkori®) for patients with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements. “We could not be happier that Dr. Shaw has joined our Scientific Advisory Board,” said Andrea Ferris, President and Chairman of LUNGevity Foundation. “She is a brilliant thinker, an innovator, and a compassionate advocate for her patients. In particular, her groundbreaking work that led to the development of Xalkori® has extended and improved the lives of many NSCLC patients. Her expertise and counsel will advance LUNGevity’s goal to increase and improve survivorship for those affected by lung cancer.” Read the full press release here.
  14. LUNGevity Foundation has launched Patient FoRCe, the first-ever critical bridge to connect the voices of lung cancer patients — a significant population — with health care professionals, regulators, policymakers, and developers of drugs. “Lung cancer is the #1 cancer killer, taking the lives of 157,000 Americans every year. LUNGevity is leading the way in changing the paradigm of cancer treatment ─ from assuming patient wishes to evidence-based conclusions about what patients value,” said LUNGevity Chairman Andrea Stern Ferris. “Through Patient FoRCe, lung cancer patient voices will be heard and heeded as policy is developed, research is conducted, and treatment decisions are made.” Patient FoRCe, LUNGevity’s Patient-Focused Research Center, will undertake never-before studies of those living with lung cancer, collecting and sharing robust qualitative and quantitative data about lung cancer patients’ preferences and experiences to inform treatment, as well as relevant policy and research protocols. Patient FoRCe’s immediate focus will include continuing a study of patient preferences and experiences regarding access to care, treatment and diagnostic options, and the impact of symptoms on daily living, as well as conducting studies to facilitate patients’ access to biomarker testing, which is essential to implementing precision medicine. Patient FoRCe will also initiate a study into increasing adherence to lung cancer screening protocols for people at high risk for lung cancer. Additional projects will be based on stakeholder input and the guidance of an external advisory board of survivors, academic and community clinicians, industry partners, patient advocacy groups, and community partners. LUNGevity formally announced Patient FoRCe at the American Association for Cancer Research’s 2017 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, on Sunday, April 2. Andrea Stern Ferris spoke to the urgency of the initiative, saying, “For too long, public policy, the practice of medicine, and drug development have not adequately integrated the viewpoint of patients. LUNGevity is determined to change that paradigm. By incorporating the patient’s voice into every step of the process – in policymaking, in trials, in treatments – we will improve outcomes for those diagnosed with lung cancer.” “Our goal is to uncover gaps in information, misperceptions about patient attitudes, and areas of unmet patient need,” explained Dr. Upal Basu Roy, Director of Patient FoRCe. “LUNGevity is the only organization driving this type of change for the lung cancer community, and we anticipate that our findings will shape the future of lung cancer care.” For more information about Patient FoRCe, visit www.LUNGevity.org/patientforce. Click here to read the full press release.
  15. Thriving With Cancer A year ago, I was the healthiest 60-something year-old person I knew. Worked out every day; ate well; kept my weight down. My blood work-ups from my annual physicals were suitable for framing. Then, the bomb hit. In October 2016, I was diagnosed with Stage IV Lung Cancer. I had thoracic surgery, and due to the recovery from that plus the pain from the disease itself, I was on a hefty dose of opiate medications. For the rest of that year, I was pretty much a pain-ridden, groggy-headed vegetable. Lung Cancer Death Sentence? But, fortunately for me, that is not the end of my story, just the beginning. For anyone who knows about this disease, my diagnosis used to be a death sentence, and frankly still is for many, many people. I, however, had the good fortune to have tested positive for a genetic mutation that could be treated with an oral medication called Tarceva; more effective than chemo and with fewer and less severe side effects. I started on this medication on November 1, 2016. Before updating you on my status, let me digress just a bit. My Unwanted Intimacy with Lung Cancer It is my great un-fortune to have considerable history with lung cancer. I held my mother’s hand 8 years ago when she took her last breath after her bout with this disease. More recently, just 3 years ago, I held my little sister’s hand when she too succumbed to this miserable malady. And so, now it’s my turn. I am now 5 months into my treatment, and pretty much back into my normal life. At the same point in time for them, my mother was dead, and my sister was desperately trying a variety of chemotherapy cocktails, to no avail. So, what is different today? The Foundations for a New Approach to Treatment The difference today can be traced back to Richard Nixon (off all people), who declared a war on cancer way back in 1971 and funded significant research efforts to fight this war. I never thought I’d be thanking Nixon for anything, but he has my gratitude. The difference is also due to Craig Venter and Francis Collins, who sequenced the human genome in the early 2000s. And, the difference is due to thousands of researchers since then who’ve utilized the foundational research that resulted from these efforts and designed whole new approaches to treatment for cancer. When my mother was diagnosed 8 years ago, she had one option for treatment: chemo. When my sister was diagnosed 4 years ago, she had two options: chemo, or targeted therapy for a couple of gene mutation. When I was diagnosed, lung cancer treatment was already in the midst of a revolution. Chemotherapy, the go-to approach for all advanced lung cancer not that long ago, is the choice only half of the time today. The other half of lung cancer cases are being treated by either targeted treatment (like my own), or immunotherapy, both of which are far, far superior. So, I am the beneficiary of research. Pure and simple. The team of people who are caring for me at Lurie are fabulous, but it is the research that led to targeted treatments that is the key to my life. Where to Next? With a need and desire to do something with my gratitude, I spent time with Dr. Platanias, who heads up The Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, and he told me about OncoSET. This, my friends, is research that will lead to the next revolution in cancer treatment: PERSONALIZATION. If you haven’t already read the summary of this effort on this page, please do. Treatment of many diseases, cancer included, will become one-to-one. Each of us treated for exactly our unique profile. I believe it, but more importantly, so do those who truly know what they are talking about. I’m in the process of sending over a hefty donation of money to jump-start the lung cancer part of this program, and am participating in the research with my own data. I will update you on what I learn about myself through this process. Thriving with Cancer? Really?! When I started this note, I told you that a year ago, I was the healthiest person I knew. A year later, I am the healthiest person I know, who happens to have cancer. It’s not SURVIVING, it’s THRIVING. And, I have research to thank. I can think of no better place to invest your support, so please join me in giving to this worthy effort. Our children and their children with thank us, even if we’re not Nixon or Venter.
  16. LUNGevity Announces Funding Opportunity for First-Ever Lung Cancer Early Detection and Interception Dream Team Call for ideas for SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association collaboration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Linda Wenger [email protected] (973) 449-3214 WASHINGTON, DC (February 6, 2017) – Building on the Foundation’s more than seven years of strategic investment in early detection research, LUNGevity Foundation, in collaboration with Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) and the American Lung Association (through its LUNG FORCE initiative), is pleased to announce that the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), SU2C’s scientific partner, has issued a Call for Ideas for research proposals that focus on lung cancer early detection and interception: catching precancerous cells and blocking them from turning into cancer cells. The interdisciplinary and multi-institutional SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team will be the first of its kind, with up to $7 million in funding support. As Dr. Pierre Massion, Professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt University, points out, "We understand the pathogenesis of lung cancer a lot better now. People have come to recognize that detecting the disease early and preventing it will require efforts between multiple disciplines to get there. The Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team is a huge step toward this goal." Dr. Massion is a member of LUNGevity’s distinguished Scientific Advisory Board and co-chairs the SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association Joint Scientific Advisory Committee (JSAC). LUNGevity is the only lung cancer nonprofit with a programmatic focus on early detection, to find lung cancer when it is most treatable. Currently, only 15% of people with lung cancer are diagnosed in the earliest stages, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 17.7%. This project expands on LUNGevity’s investment in early detection research with the goal of developing an effective, widely available, noninvasive way of finding lung cancer early in all populations. Prioritized areas of interest for this project include research that accurately categorizes premalignant conditions according to risk of progression and that elucidates the underlying alterations that increase that risk; identification of new targets for developing therapeutic interventions of these early lesions; potential surrogate endpoints for clinical trials and regulatory approval; new tools for early detection and monitoring progression; the role of inflammation and immunosuppression in progression; or research targeted at generating sufficient knowledge to justify a clinical intervention to test novel hypotheses. Applicants for the grants are expected to show how their proposed projects will have positive benefit for patients in the near future, achieved through investigation by a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional, synergistic Dream Team of expert investigators. Priority will be given to applications that are characterized by a diversity of team members, including those from fields outside the traditional realms of biomedical research (e.g., physics, mathematics, engineering, health policy, and communications). Specific aims of the project may include basic research, translational studies, and population studies, but the overall proposal must have a strong clinical research component. Program details can be found at https://proposalcentral.altum.com. Letters of Intent are due by March 8, 2017. Read the full press release on LUNGevity's website.
  17. Study Announcement: Lung Cancer Caregiver Study If you are over the age of 18 and a romantic partner and the caregiver of someone who has been diagnosed with lung cancer in the past two years, please consider contributing to this important study on the quality of life of caregivers of lung cancer patients and survivors. This study consists of completing a brief online survey at 2 different time points over the course of six months (initial time point and 6 months later). Some find the surveys helpful for reflecting on their caregiving experience, and you would be contributing to our understanding of the important but understudied topic of the challenges faced by caregivers. The survey questions will ask you about your feelings about caregiving, your quality of life, your physical health, and the physical health of the lung cancer survivor for whom you are a caregiver. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes at each of the two time points. This research is being conducted by Trisha Raque-Bogdan, Ph.D. of the University of Denver and Amanda Ginter, Ph.D., of Towson University. If you would like to participate in this research, please either go to https://udenver.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_etkPpCNDT9HwkKN or contact Trisha Raque-Bogdan at [email protected] Thank you for your consideration! Trisha Raque-Bogdan, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Counseling Psychology University of Denver Amanda Ginter, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Family Studies Towson University This study has been approved for posting by LUNGevity Foundation.
  18. LUNGevity Foundation Issues Request for Applications for 2017 Career Development Awards for Translational Research in Lung Cancer Application now available online FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Austin Courtney [email protected] (202) 414-0791 Washington, D.C. (January 17, 2017) — LUNGevity has issued a Request for Applications (RFA) for translational research for Career Development Awards that will be granted in 2017. The RFA is available on the LUNGevity website at www.LUNGevity.org/career-development-awards and is also posted on the proposalCENTRAL website at https://proposalcentral.altum.com. LUNGevity’s Career Development Awards for Translational Research program was created to support future research leaders who will keep the field of lung cancer research vibrant with new ideas. Successful applicants may receive $100,000 per year for a possible period of three years and will participate as non-voting members of LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board for the duration of the award. Applicants must be within the first five years of their faculty appointment. The Career Development Awards are mentored awards, and a mentoring plan is part of the required submission. Projects that will be funded in 2017 are expected to have a direct impact on the early detection of lung cancer or on the outcomes of lung cancer, or to provide a clear conceptual or experimental foundation for the future development of methods for early detection and/or individualized treatment, including through targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Letters of intent must be submitted by Friday, February 20, 2017. LUNGevity supports the largest research awards program of any lung cancer-focused organization in the United States. Since 2002, LUNGevity has funded 118 projects at 58 institutions in 23 states. About Lung Cancer in the U.S. About 1 in 15 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime More than 224,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year About 60%-65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are among people who have never smoked or are former smokers Lung cancer takes more lives than the next four deadliest cancers (colorectal, pancreatic, breast, and prostate) combined Only 18% of all people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive 5 years or more, BUT if it’s caught before it spreads, the chance for 5-year survival improves dramatically About LUNGevity Foundation LUNGevity Foundation is firmly committed to making an immediate impact on increasing quality of life and survivorship of people with lung cancer by accelerating research into early detection and more effective treatments, as well as by providing community, support, and education for all those affected by the disease. Our vision is a world where no one dies of lung cancer. For more information about LUNGevity Foundation, please visit www.LUNGevity.org. Click here to read the full press release online.
  19. Edward Garon, MD, of UCLA joins the LUNGevity Foundation Scientific Advisory Board Dr. Garon brings expertise in clinical trials and other key areas to LUNGevity’s research program FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Austin Courtney [email protected] (202) 414-0791 WASHINGTON, DC (January 13, 2017) – LUNGevity Foundation, the nation’s preeminent lung cancer research foundation, today announced that Edward Garon, MD, has joined LUNGevity’s Scientific Advisory Board, a group of 19 world-renowned scientists and researchers who guide LUNGevity’s scientific strategy and research program. The Scientific Advisory Board is integral to the Foundation, overseeing the scientific approach and ensuring that grants are awarded to the researchers whose proposals demonstrate the greatest potential for finding lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable phase, as well as extending and improving lives for lung cancer survivors. LUNGevity is the only lung cancer organization with programmatic focuses on early detection and Career Development Awards. LUNGevity-funded researchers are working on finding a better way to detect lung cancer, and to better diagnose, treat, and prevent its recurrence. The research program is a crucial factor in moving the science forward to improve outcomes for people living with lung cancer. Dr. Garon is the Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA and Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He has been the principal investigator of peer-reviewed grants from various funding organizations, including the National Cancer Institute. His focus is on clinical research and biomarker development. He has served as the principal investigator on national and international phase I, II, and III clinical trials. Among these are trials that have led to the approval of drugs for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, including ramucirumab (Cyramza®) and the immunotherapy pembrolizumab (Keytruda®). “We are honored that Dr. Garon has joined our Scientific Advisory Board,” said Andrea Ferris, President and Chairman of LUNGevity Foundation. “His expertise and advice will be invaluable to furthering LUNGevity’s goal to improve outcomes for lung cancer patients.” Click here to read the complete press release on LUNGevity.org.
  20. Good afternoon, LCSC members! Every Friday, I will start sharing a weekly clip report in this forum. I encourage you to reply to each thread to let us know what kind of news stories are most interesting/relevant to you. I'll post the first weekly clip report this Friday, December 16! With gratitude, Lauren -- Digital Community Manager LUNGevity Foundation
  21. LUNGevity is interested in your personal experience as a person living with lung cancer. Your answers will help us develop additional support and education resources. This survey is for research purposes only – we will not ask you for a donation. • The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. • Responses will remain strictly confidential. Your name or contact information will never be shared. Thank you in advance for helping us with this survey, and please know that your feedback truly helps make a difference! http://dimensions.edgeresearch.com/e.asp?p=LUN1502&S=C&ps1=FB
  22. Reposting this vetted survey opportunity (i did verify that your information is confidential and I have taken a look at the survey) this is NOT sponsored by LUNGevity in any way: "Would you like to participate in a national market research survey being done to better understand patient preferences and feelings about hypothetical treatments? A total of 100 advanced stage NSCLC patients will be recruited for an on-line survey this week and next. Also, three patients with advanced stage NSCLC are needed for a 30 minute in-person interview IN BOSTON on Wednesday, 9/30. Honoraria for participation will be paid to participants who qualify - $50 online survey/$150 for the Boston in-person interview. Please reach out to Linda Pelligra at [email protected] for more details."
  23. The “Rally for Medical Research Hill Day” has nearly 200 people registered to participate in the meetings on Capitol Hill on Thursday, September 17. The states that are “not represented” at this point include: Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. To register to participate please click the link below: http://rallyformedicalresearch.org/Pages/Hill-Day-Signup.aspx
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