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Small Cell Cervical cancer and clinical trials...


meredith

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I have small cell cancer of the cervix. When it comes to clinical trials (not that I'm considering one right now), I've kind of got the short end of the stick. Most cervical cancer trials involve squamous cell cancers, and lung cancer trials want lung cancer patients.

Does anyone know perhaps if sclc trials would accept patients with small cell cancer in a different organ?

My mom has been communicating with a researcher who is working on a therapeutic vaccine for cervical cancer treatment, but even here they are focusing on treating squamous cell. I think he told her I might could get in compassionate grounds if other treatments don't work.

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Meredith Click on this link for info on trials most are recruiting!!

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/search?ter ... mit=Search

You are a researcher I see by posts

check in new meds forum for more linksk and info stickies and announcements are most pertinent. Let us know when ya need info. Love to research things.

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Glad to see by your bio that the last combo of meds seemed to help.

Cisplatin is notorious for causing neuropathy. If they need to try it again maybe they could swith back to carbopotin-it seems to work almost as well as it and does not have the neuropathy problems.

Good luck

Condy

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We would all like to think that all treatments are the same for the same kinds of cancers, but that's not the case. Breast cancer, is treated very differently then your cancer, as is lung cancer is not treated the same as cervical cancer. The type of cancer isn't as important as where the cancer is.

I learned this information dealing with many different doctor's over the years. They may use the same chemo's on all kinds/types of cancers but treatments are different in the long run.

Best wishes to you.

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Meredith,

I would think if your pathology was the same, being small cell, they would still concider you for trials.

I say this slightly from experience. In August 2004 my husband participated in a trial for Indium III out of Louisiana Mercy Hospital in New Orleans. The trial was actually recruiting intestinal Large cell or Atypical carcinoid patients with sandostatin receptors. Now my husband has Atypical Carcinoid Lung Cancer with sandostatin receptors, not exactly what they were recruiting for, but we never got one word of hesitation or reservation when enrolling. They took him in right away since his scans showed he had the same cellular structure and tumor responsiveness.

I would say, if anything comes up in the future (And I pray you never have the need), that you apply for any trial that interests you. It couldn't hurt to try.

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Yes, I think carboplatin is an option.

When I was referred to the second oncologist, I had mentioned taking carboplatin because I had started to feel numbness, but only in my toes. But he wanted to continue with the cisplatin because I had such a good response with it and he felt that I was young and could handle it. But then the numbness and pain started crawling up my legs and my hands, and so it was discontinued.

Still, looking back on it I'm glad he was aggressive with the treatment, as it seems to have worked for now!

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Yes, mostly the treatments are different. However, from all my research and discussions with doctors, small cell cervical cancer is often treated the same as small cell lung cancer, mostly because there are so few cases of the cervical variety that they don't have a standard treatment protocol.

I see that you have lung cancer yourself and have lost so many family members. We have to find a cure for this cancer crap.

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Keith so far has only truly participated in that one. It was overall a good experience, and it was something that provided some hope. So far we've been really low on options that provide any hope for him.

The only negative thing I can say for that trial, and all the other trials we've tried to get into is that the time it takes to go through consultation, get whatever tests and scans taken that are needed for enrollment and conversations back and forth between trial doctors and Keith's primary onc is so long it was so frustrating waiting and waiting to see if we could do it. It was the worst when we tried to get him into a study in Switzerland and he had to have specific scans taken then sent to Iowa who forward to Switzerland. It took 4 months of us hoping and praying just to find out he wasn't accepted. What a let down.

We are actually going to the University of Chicago on the 14th to try and see if they have ANY trials that Keith can do, as he has exhausted all chemo and standard protocol options. Keep your fingers crossed for us :)

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Meredith use that link and that is clinicaltrials.gov very comprehensive will save time for new trials. Let me know if I can help more be glad to do whatever I can do.

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If I remember correctly, Topotecan and Iretecan (sp) were both originally ovarian cancer drugs. Someone had to test that drug on other types of cancers in a clinical study, right? right!

Keep searching. Don't give up and even if you don't see anything specific for cervical cancer- ASK. There are occasions that people get allowed into a clinical study or even have clinical studies created for their situations.

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Irinotecan (camptosar) was orig. used on colon cancer-trials with it on sclc-- done in Japan several yrs ago showed great results on sclc.

The FDA approved its use on sclc in the late 90's (I believe) because of the good results those trials had.

I had a terrible time with the cisplatin after the 7th month-I was switched to carboplatin due to the neuropathy. It has been 4 yrs now and I still have tingling in my feet, it never went away.

Good luck

Cindy

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So, was the carboplatin easier to tolerate? I have heard that it is....

For me, the neuropathy got pretty bad with the cisplatin. I wan't expecting it to be that bad. Of course, I had some prior nerve damage; during my surgery, my femoral nerve in my right leg was "compressed" and the leg was almost totally non-functional. I was using a walker for a couple of months. Use of it has come back, but the chemo induced neuropathy is still really bothering me. I have a lot of leg cramps and sharp, shooting pains, especially at night.

For quality of life reasons, I don't think I want any more cisplatin.

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