Jump to content

stem cells and tumors


yirol

Recommended Posts

You're welcome! After posting, I realized that it's a Dec. 2004 article and wonder about updates on this research. For instance, could Tarceva be an outcome of this research, or does Tarceva target some other aspect of a cancer cell (I think so?).

Also, I am so new to all of this, but wonder if anyone knows about a theory that some lung cancer cells may be produced as a way to COMBAT carcinogens. Is it naive to think that my father's BAC is an overzealous and eventually perverse attmempt by his lungs to heal and "realign" after impossibly large quantities of smoke-related toxins? I know that the body strives to heal...so it seems logical that stem-cells are present in cancer cells as well as normal cells...and that in both cases, the body is really just trying to heal....just that we get such unfortunate outcomes with the former....

Somehow, right now I like this theory better than the theory that human bodies are just "vessels for viruses," even if both theories are false/and or naive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stem Cell treatments are being researched for Vaccine purposes right now. Can not find any info though on Cancer cells and carcinogens though. Let me know if I can help. I am Moderator for New treatment and Clinical trial forums. Great at research too. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NEW YORK, May 9 (Reuters) - Pharmacyclics Inc. (PCYC.O: Quote, Profile, Research Chief Executive Richard Miller on Wednesday expressed confidence that the company's experimental cancer vaccine will win U.S. approval despite initial rejection of the new drug application by U.S. health regulators.

The tiny biotechnology company last month took the unusual step of filing its application for the vaccine Xcytrin over protest, in effect forcing the Food and Drug Administration to review it for approval despite the FDA refusal based on the drug's failure to meet a prespecified primary goal in a pivotal late stage clinical trial of patients with lung cancer that had spread to the brain.

"I'm convinced we'll get Xcytrin approved eventually for something because I believe it's an active drug," Miller said in an interview.

"I think our data shows substantial efficacy and I think if they review it in detail and put it in proper context, bringing in advisors who know the disease, that it should meet that standard" (for approval), Miller said.

Reuters Pictures

Editors Choice: Best pictures

from the last 24 hours.

View Slideshow

With some 100,000 cases of brain metastases from lung cancer diagnosed in the United States each year, and few if any treatment options available that address the cognitive and physical impairments caused by the disease, Miller said Xcytrin could become a hugely successful product.

"I believe it would become the standard of care," he said. "There's no other treatment, so why wouldn't a doctor use this? If people look at the data in detail, they'll want to use this drug."

© Reuters 2007. All rights reserved.

Reuters Pictures

Editors Choice: Best pictures

from the last 24 hours.

View Slideshow

This is one program

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.