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Lung Cancer & dogs


ellakc2

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Last night on abc, there was a new game show on called Duel. One of the questions was in 2006 they have trained dogs which can find lc by smelling your breathe, they can detect the chemicals. Has anyone ever heard of this?

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Colleen swears that our neighbors dog Stormy knows. Whenever she is down there, even befor DX Col would say how Stormy would just come and lay with her. She's a very loving dog, but it was a different kind of thing, almost like the dog had pity in it's eyes and comfort in its heart. I believe it 100%.

There was alos a thing on local news here in Philly that said sun may help prevent LC, by producing vitamin d (i believe it was d). And that 15 minutes of sun a day can be helpful, just not excessive sun so as not to bring Skin cancer into the equation. They also said sunny climates have lower rates of LC. Never heard it before, but who knows. I'm working on damage control right now, as moving to Arizona, or paying for year round tanning for Col was not in this year's budget.lol.

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Yes, no doubt in my mind. Hannah knew I was sick before I got the persistent cough that eventually led to a diagnosis. She would stare at me for long periods without a blink, probably trying to communicate something to me, but it takes two to communicate and I was oblivious.

I also know of cases where dogs detected imminent seizures, vertigo attacks, and other such events before they happened, and then took action like moving next to the persons if they were standing, or preventing them from getting out of a chair if seated. Many or even most dogs can probably detect these subtle changes, but some are much better than others in doing something about it.

Thanks for the post -- what a wonderful species. Aloha,

Ned

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Wow! I can't believe its true! That is why our dog Sophie who was always a sweet dog and was always close to my mom had gotten closer to my mom now - we didn't know they could become closer - they are inseparable now! The dog lays on my mom and stares at her and even if she is in the bathroom the dog will wait outside the door and listen for her. It's so beautiful that our dog has that bond with her and ability to sense it.

Marci

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I saw a documentary on dogs that mentioned the ability to detect cancer. The show didnt't mention lc specifically, and the dogs were not smelling breath, but sniffing something like they would sniff for explosives and such. Not sure where they are in terms of someday using dogs as "early detection" but woudln't that be amazing?!

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Actually I had a cat who I had for 11 yrs before I got sick. She was not a people cat and would never sit on anyone's lap or cuddling. When I was sick I couldn't get rid of her. She was in my bed and up my butt.LOL!!!

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  • 3 weeks later...

The role dogs play in medicine is celebrated in a new book, “Paws & Effect: The Healing Power of Dogs’’ (Alyson Books, 2007), which chronicles the numerous ways dogs contribute to our health. Author Sharon Sakson is a journalist and television producer, dog breeder and American Kennel Club dog-show judge. She admits to being biased about her subject matter, and she tends to write about the mundane details of dogs and their owners. Much of the evidence surrounding dogs and health is anecdotal, although Ms. Sakson includes many references to published research. The stories of service dogs are particularly impressive, as is the nascent research into dogs’ ability to detect cancer.

Ms. Sakson said she first began thinking about the link between dogs and health while reporting an earlier book on men and dogs. A few men she interviewed who had AIDS credited their dogs with playing a role in their improved health.

While Ms. Sakson says more studies are needed to show exactly what role dogs play in health, any dog owner already knows the benefits of their relationship with their pet.

“I went into it because I loved my dogs — they can do so much for our society,'’ said Ms. Sakson. “There’s no question they give us emotional support.'’

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I saw a program on a dog that could sniff out breast cancer. I hadn't heard of the lung cancer. But I do know that they are a wonderful species and if we could only communicate better with them they could surely teach us alot. And I don't know about that sunnier climate and lower lung cancer either. Here in south Georgia we also have one of the highest rates of lung cancer and we're 15 minutes from Florida.

I can also say that if it weren't for my surviving animals I wouldn't get out of bed lots of days. Especially lately.

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There was a very interesting news story recently about a resident cat at a nursing home who "knew" when one of the residents was about to pass. It would curl up on their bed as if to comfort them and stay with them until the end. They interviewed the nurses who said the cat was NEVER wrong.

Kinda sweet - especially if that person was alone.

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