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Exercise Programs May Benefit Lung Cancer Patients


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http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/148889.php

ARTICLE:

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Exercise is known to have a positive effect on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and a study in the May issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology has shown that exercise also plays an important role in both primary and secondary prevention of cancer. The Journal of Thoracic Oncology is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Dr. Jennifer Temel at Massachusetts General Hospital found that exercise impacts the health and quality of life of patients with an advanced or incurable lung cancer diagnosis. Between October 2004 and August 2007, Dr. Temel and her team enrolled 25 lung cancer patients in a study to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a structured, hospital-based exercise program in these patients.

The evaluation consisted of twice-weekly sessions of aerobic exercise and weight training over an eight week period. The baseline evaluation included assessments of exercise response, functional exercise capacity (measured by the six-minute walk test) and muscle strength. The structured sessions took place in a group format and lasted between 90-120 minutes and also evaluated the health related quality of life.

Although less than half of the participants were able to complete the exercise program, researchers found it promising that those individuals who did complete the study experienced a significant reduction in lung cancer symptoms and no deterioration in their six-minute walk test or muscle strength. The results of this study also suggest that community-based or shorter exercise programs may be more feasible for lung cancer patients to complete. Researchers concluded that additional studies should explore the connection between exercise habits and lung cancer survival rates in order to further characterize the future development of exercise programs.

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(Medical News Today, Main Category: Lung Cancer, Source: Bthany Fischer International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, May 5, 2009)

Disclaimer:

The information contained in these articles may or may not be in agreement with my own opinions. They are not being posted with the intention of being medical advice of any kind.

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If interested, check with your local YMCA and see if they participate in the "Exercise and Thrive Program" - a 10 week, twice a week program for lung cancer survivors (you have to have completed treatment and get a release from your doc.) It's supported by the LiveStrong Foundation. I start next week!

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Dr Pennell discussed this in this poston GRACE. Being a bicycle nut, it was a very interesting topic to me.

It's a bit of a catch-22. I think exercising really helps a lot, but trying to exercise while battling the symptoms of lung cancer treatments (not to mention the lung cancer itself) is no easy task.

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I totally agree with you about trying to exercise while combating the rigors of chemotherapy - not an easy task.

What Bill and I have discovered (over four and almost a 1/2 years) has been that working every day (during chemotherapy regimens) at some chores, doing some work, getting some things accomplished, and activating the muscles in even that limited venue, has helped greatly.

I will be glad to read the Grace comments, and do believe that anything that moves in a direction of maintaining our vitality (however much or little that might be) is essential in this journey.

(If I were younger [waaaay younger] I would be, I am sure a bicycle nut, as well. ) :lol:

Barbara

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Mom has started working out on her Wii Fit since ending treatment. Her Oncologist agrees and says he doesn't belive in coddling old people (he said this with a twinkle in his eye because Mom was giving him hell about something at the time). "No coddling Old people" has now become soemthing of a battle cry at our house. I think the exercise s helping her to feel stronger and more energetic. And let's not forget our dear Earnie who kept up his running through most of his treatment.

Susan

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Hi Barb,

Great Article! --I'm a big believer in exercising regardless if one is sick/healthy. I love walking and have been doing it (an hour) daily for the most part since Jr. High and only stopped about 2 years ago give or take because of other health issues and instead ride a stationary bike (an hour, ten minutes at a time) daily for the most part. It's also a great way to release stress. It can be done, it's a mind set and of course not everyone can for any number of reasons but I'm talking about in general. Every time I'm in the hospital they encourage you to get up and walk even after major surgery. Like you mentioned it does not have to be done all at once or even strenuous for that matter but it does help greatly. I would say like the article mentioned I have had relatively few problems with my lung cancer because I exercise. I might not read/respond to every post any more because of poor health put I always try to read your posts every time I go to the board because they are very informative and I believe knowledge is the key. Thanks for taking the time to do the research.

Rich

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Oh, that is so nice to hear, Rich.

Acutally, my posting anything relevant to lung cancer that might be interesting to others is a selfishness on my part. Doing it releases some stress that I have.

As for Bill, these past few months, has stopped shoveling/mowing. He has "retired" those activities. He does, though, keep up with some weeding. That, and maybe some painting of the top of the metal fence posts with gold, filling in the bare spots on the base of the house, and fixing/repairing some things.

He vacuums in short spurts, has always done the dishes (before putting them in the dishwasher :roll: ) and generally helps to keep things running around here.

I keep moving, as well. After all, someone's got help the elder fellow.

For my part, we have realized that Bill has done relatively well on all chemos. Except for the usual side effects of fatigue, he has been pretty much symptom free.

He is 78 1/2 yrs., and is still driving (short runs to the store/doctors visits and the like, and keeping his body still active in some way each day. Nothing is done in large chunks, but in small portions.

So we do think it has made a difference. He never forgets to take the daily nap, and that seems to revitalize him, as well - puts a balance to things.

Barbara

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