Jump to content

First 6 Month CT since the surgery.


JWH

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone

As you might remember I had my upper right lobe surgery after an early incidental fine for NSCLC  in May of this year. Post operative findings were nothing short of miraculous. All clear around the margins and 28 nodes tested negative. One could not ask for a better outcome. On November 17 I had my first follow up CT. scan. As I am navigating through my online results,  "No evidence of residual or recurrent malignancy".  So thankful for this, and this could not be better news, but then the next line reads, "Unchanged 3 to 4 mm nodule lingula of left upper lobe". This was quite the shock, particularly the word unchanged, because I was not even aware that there was a nodule in the left lobe to remain unchanged. I of course am thankful that it is unchanged,  but also unsure what comes next. I know that 3 to 4 mm is quite small, but wondering why this was not mention in any of the other CT's or PET scan prior to my surgery. If it  is unchanged apparently it was visible on a  previous scan. And also what next? Something this small how concerned should I be right now? I'm not freaking out over it, but thinking down the road what may become of it since I obviously have a higher risk factor.  I have a follow up with the Oncologist early in December, to discuss the findings and to enlighten me with this bit of news.

 Thank you everyone

  If your on Lungevity, then your in my prayers

     JWH          

Link to comment
Share on other sites

JWC,

Obviously I have no explanation for the nodule on your left upper lobe but offer one logic argument for your consideration. If this “unchanged” nodule was suspicious, then the surgeon would not have removed your upper right lobe. 

I make it a practice to get copies of all radiology reports and read them. After all you paid the radiologist and are entitled to the report. To minimize your scanziety, you might want to call your oncology practice and arrange to pick up hard copies of all radiology reports before your consult. Then you’ll be able to identify and track the “unchanged” nodule and ask your doctor for an explanation. In particular, the PET scan report’s lack of uptake would be very telling and comforting. 

I’m away from my computer else I’d post the link, but Google search Cleveland Clinic lung nodules. They have an easily readable explanation for all types of non-cancerous lung nodules. 

Stay the course. 

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

JWC,

A "surprise" nodule happened with my mom too.  Her oncologist just nonchalantly mentioned it during one of her follow-up scans and when we questioned it, she said it had been there all along.  They kept an eye on it for a bit through follow-up scans and, happily, the nodule is no longer there/visible.  As Tom mentioned, people get non-life threatening lung nodules for many different reasons.  My mom has RA and lung nodules are quite common in RA patients - her RA doc told her that he has a patient with over 40 lung nodules throughout her lungs.  They come and go, shrink and grow.  From what I've learned, lung nodules come in a couple of different types - 2 of them being spiculated (sharp points like a star) and non-spiculated (smooth surface).  Spiculated nodules tend to be the cancerous type - my mom had 2 spiculated nodules in her upper, right lobe that were removed during her lobectomy.  The other "surprise" nodule was too small to tell what type it was.  But, just because a nodule is spiculated, does not mean it is cancerous and vice versa. 

If you are concerned about it, contact your doc before your appointment.  My mom emails her docs with various questions and concerns that come up between appointments and all responses have been timely and helpful.

On the bright side, congrats on your clean scan surrounding the initial area of concern - that is something to celebrate!  Happy dance for you! And hoping all goes well with the "surprise" nodule. 

Take care,

Steff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi JWH,

Good result! Yay for NED!  My CT report noted "nodules" in my left lunt (I had a right lower lobectomy) . T hese are apparently what  was pteviously repporte as scarring, by different radiologists. My pulmonologost said these are probably due to valley fever which was never diagnosed. She asked me where I grew up. It was in central California, where the fungus causing this disease exists. So there are a lot of different kinds of nodules, many of which are harmless, It's worth asking your doctor.

Bridget O

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BridgetO

 Very interesting,  We lived in Central California on a ranch for 10 years, and although very familiar with Valley Fever and its affects it never cross my mind until now. That could very well be the  explanation for this Nodule. I even wonder now if this was not the source for the right Lung mass in the first place. Twice a year we would disk up the orchards at our place. Of course dust would feel the air, and I'm sure even though we wore covering over our face it was impossible not to inhale more than our share. Yes very enlightening indeed. Time for some more researching.

 Thank you for you input, and Yes YEAH FOR NED !

 JWH

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi JWH,

Radiologists looking at several CT scans never mentioned the possibility of valley fever. My pulmonologist asked me about it first time I saw  her. Seems like different kinds of nodules and scars (and cancers)  have distinctive appearances. Do you have a pulmonologist looking at your CT?

Bridget O

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.