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PaulaC

Pathology Results

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I just received my pathology results from my lobectomy  and now I'm a little confused. The results show that the upper left lung nodule was NSCLC with features compatible with Squamous Cell Carcinoma. My confusion is that all other test/biopsy showed adenocarcinoma of the lung.  Why would it be different? 

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Paula,

If the adenocarcinoma finding resulted from a biopsy, determined by a pathologist, I’d be confused also. Here is what I’d do. Get the actual biopsy report and read it. Get the path report from the surgical resection and read it. If they don’t read the same subtype, have the ordering doctor ask both the biopsy and surgery sample be re-examined by a different pathologist. 

Tissue samples are normally kept quite a while so a re-exam should be possible. 

Stay the course. 

Tom

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29 minutes ago, Tom Galli said:

Paula,

If the adenocarcinoma finding resulted from a biopsy, determined by a pathologist, I’d be confused also. Here is what I’d do. Get the actual biopsy report and read it. Get the path report from the surgical resection and read it. If they don’t read the same subtype, have the ordering doctor ask both the biopsy and surgery sample be re-examined by a different pathologist. 

Tissue samples are normally kept quite a while so a re-exam should be possible. 

Stay the course. 

Tom

Tom,

Thanks for responding and yes the needle biopsy showed adenocarcinoma and the lobectomy Squamous Cell Carcinoma. I will do has you suggested and talk to the doctors. 

Paula

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Very best wishes Paula. Sounds like you got some great advice there. My family doc called to say I had a carcinoma after getting report of biopsy. The pulmonologist called with results and said it was carcinoid. He was right. But just shows it could be as simple as a typo. I hope it makes more sense after you talk with them . You are keeping it straight which is great. Love and strength to you. 

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 I called and talked to the oncologist's nurse and she sees what I did,  The needle biopsy shows adenocarcinoma and the lobectomy Squamous Cell Carcinoma.  I also had the PT nurse read my reports and she agreed... I'm waiting to hear back.

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Well that's a step in figuring that out. Hopefully it will be the best possible scenario out of what it could be. Thinking of you. Hope they call back. Love ya and wish you all the best my sister. 

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Found this on the American Cancer society website:  

What does it mean if my carcinoma is called non-small cell carcinoma?

In some cases, the cancer clearly does not look like small cell carcinoma under the microscope, but at the same time it is hard to tell whether it is a squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma.  This distinction between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be especially difficult in small biopsy specimens. The term non-small cell carcinoma is often used for these carcinomas until they can be more precisely classified by special lab tests(such as immunohistochemistry), or until the entire tumor is removed during surgery and then examined.  

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5 minutes ago, Robert Macaulay said:

Paula

Biopsy-site changes can be identified in a significant proportion of lung tumors after core needle biopsy. 

 

Bob

 

Thanks 😁

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2 hours ago, BridgetO said:

Found this on the American Cancer society website:  

What does it mean if my carcinoma is called non-small cell carcinoma?

In some cases, the cancer clearly does not look like small cell carcinoma under the microscope, but at the same time it is hard to tell whether it is a squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma.  This distinction between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be especially difficult in small biopsy specimens. The term non-small cell carcinoma is often used for these carcinomas until they can be more precisely classified by special lab tests(such as immunohistochemistry), or until the entire tumor is removed during surgery and then examined.  

This is good information. Thank you BridgetO

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Just got home from my appointment with the oncologist and he basically said it’s possible to have both types of cancer. Squamish and Adenocarcinoma  🤷‍♀️. I know it’s weird but that was his answer after his discussion with the tumor board. 

The good news is I’m NED or has he stated no evidence of cancer. I’ll be in a watch and see program with my first CT scan in mid January.  I’m excited, stunned and part of me is afraid to believe it. 🙏🙏🙏

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