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RICK SIMPSON OIL

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Looking for anyone who has experience and or knowledge.  In early August my wife was diagnosed with NSCLC Squamous cell.   Stage 2A .     A new CT Scan has showed that the growth has not changed in over 4 months.     The only treatment so far has been high doses of Simpson Oil.    Surgery is scheduled for this month but I can not understand how this type of tumor has not changed in nearly five months.     

Does anyone know what the likelihood is of a 4 cm squamous cell tumor not growing at all in 140 days?

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I don’t have any answers for you on if it’s possible or not but I’m sure others can help.  I know that having Stage 3b nsclc squamous cell they doctor was pretty positive it wasn’t growing fast and he took time to run a lot of test. 

 

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Thank you PaulaC.     When my wife was first diagnosed everyone acted as though it was a dire emergency to have surgery asap.   We actually got into a spat with a surgeon because we wanted to wait until after the holidays.

   I was told that this type of tumor typically doubles in size every 200 days or so.  Do you have any idea as to what led your dr to think that the growth rate was slow?

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 I don’t know why he was of that opinion but he was pretty adamant about it. He did say my type of cancer was slow growing. 

 I was under the assumption that my tumor had been there awhile and waiting wouldn’t change it.  

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FYI I was diagnosed in Feb 2018,  chemo and radiation didn’t start till April 23rd 2018.  The tumor shrunk enough for surgery on October 5th.  The surgery was successful and as of no I’m NED.  No cancer. 

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Nothing is impossible as far as cancer is concerned. It is possible that the tumor may not have grown at all but it is also possible for the tumor to shed microscopic cells into the bloodstream for further metastates(not trying to scare but there are thousands such possibilities) so it's better to act quickly. If I were you I would have gone straight to have surgery at least this is what we did in my husband's case. I wish you all the very best. 

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Thank you hope16        I am beginning to learn that the science of cancer diagnosis and treatment is vague.   You say that it is better to act quickly but I'm not so sure. I guess acting quickly is a subjective term and I'm not sure what you feel acting quickly means.  When my wife was first diagnosed there was an air of urgency among most of the medical pros.  They made no secret that they wanted to operate immediately.  URGENT!     When I began to ask questions they seemed to change their tune. All of a sudden the urgency wasn't there.  It seems as though there was an urgency as long as it fit into their calendar schedule.  If their schedule had some conflict the urgency disappeared.  One minute its an emergency and the next minute ,  "it can wait"

We are meeting with a new oncologist on Monday and I am hoping to find out,    "how does a NSCLC squamous cell tumor just stop growing"?   I find it surprising but I know very little about the subject.  I'm hoping someone in this forum can help me understand.    

I also have to learn more about the surgery itself.  One surgeon says cant do it, another surgeon says no problem.  CONFUSING

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