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Kwally3

How do you research early data to identify promising clinical trials?

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Hi friends,
I'm wondering about what websites/sources you go to learn about the upcoming drugs being tested for clinical trials. ClinicalTrials government website rarely posts results of in-progress or even completed trials. What analysts, reporters, conference proceedings, academic journals do you use? MY current method doesn't dig up as much information on the landscape of upcoming drugs as I'd like (and if i do find somthing, it's hard to find animal/petri dish results or phase I results). Currently:

  • Ask our oncologist for what she's heard that are promising
  • get list of clinical trials and try to find their active compound
  • take list from above two and search at my university library's online academic journals (web of science) for papers discussing the compounds and any early results

Thanks

 

edit: We are still in first line treatment, so goal is to track promising clinical trials (or soon to be clinical trials).

 

 

 

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Kwally3,

I'm confused (a typical state) about your mention of "technologies" and clinical trials, particularly clinical lung cancer trials.  Most I know of involve new drugs. There are however a small number of radiation and surgical methods that occasionally are performed in a clinical trial setting. That said, I used MD Anderson's website as my first search site.

I'm sure there are many cancer research hospital website resources but I'm familiar with MD Anderson and comfortable navigating their website.

Stay the course.

Tom 

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@Kwally3 I use Google scholar alerts.  You can search for the information and set up notification alerts when new information is found.   

Http://www.scholar.google.com

 

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22 hours ago, LUNGevityKristin said:

Are you trying to find a clinical trial that is best for a patient?  LUNGevity has a great Clinical Trial Finder that can match a patient with clinical trial options.

@LUNGevityKristin

Hi, not currently.Trying to find promising drugs to better inform which clinical trials we should consider. We are still on first line treatment. 

@Tom Galli I'm mostly looking at drugs. By new technology, i meant things like immunotherapy/Car-T therapy instead of the golden standard. . . I'll change the original post. Suppose something on MD Anderson catches your interest. What are the next steps you take to find out more? 

@Curt what keywords do you put alerts for? Have you been able to find early results, perhaps phase 1 data or animal studies/petri-dishes results?

Thanks everyone!

 

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I’ve attached a screen shot of the ones I have setup.  Try some searches out.  If they return back relevant results for what you are looking for you can setup an alert that notifies you when new relevant information becomes available.   I’ve opted to get emails weekly.   

DAFBDE1B-5A69-4B1B-802A-93BADC88F897.jpeg

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Kwally3,

Here is the way I approach researching clinical trials.  I'm no longer in treatment, so my research is to add to my knowledge base as a forum moderator.

  1. Initial search is made at MD Anderson. Then I develop a short list of interest.
  2. This short list is then screened at the National Cancer Institute
  3. Sometimes, I consult by email with the National Cancer Institute Intramural and Extramural Program PIs but they are extremely busy and slow to answer email. 
  4. Sometimes, I also email members of the Lungevity Foundation's Scientific Advisory Board. But these individuals are all practicing physicians and often too busy to respond to email.
  5. My best source of information (explanation) about clinical oncologists is with my medical oncologist. I've been seeing him for more that 15 years and I either add the trial question to those intended to be asked at a forthcoming consultation or email him with a question. He often responds to my emails because I interrupt him very infrequently.

This forum is also a very good source of patient experiences while in clinical trials.  In our Immunotherapy Forum, we have a very comprehensive discussion of clinical trial treatment of the new drug Durvalumab. But, understand clinical trials and criteria for participation is exceedingly complex and mind numbing activity. I hope this helps.

Stay the course.

Tom

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