Jump to content

Carona


TJM

Recommended Posts

Use to be when I thought of Carona I immediately thought of a line.

Now I think of a pandemic. Am I being a bit paranoid worrying about having a portion of my lung removed now? I do live on the left coast...

Dont read me wrong....if there was an outbreak of the plague I would still do the surgery. I want that vile thing out.

But would rather it was happening  without the backdrop of a burgeoning pandemic.

Peace

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi TJM / Tom,

I haven't been online here for a while... so not sure if this is your first post or if there are others. Offering my two bits in response to your post...

I can understand your concern. I had my right upper lung lobe removed in October 2018 (@ Swedish Seattle) and received a stage 1 NSCLC dx. I had no other treatment other than surgery. I am approaching my 3rd CT (April 2020) follow-up since that surgery.  I have one, possibly two nodules showing in my upper left lung now that they are watching as they appear to be slow growing cancer.  Yes, I am nervous and concerned, but trying to push it out of my head as much as I can right now and focusing on continuing with my "normal" life.

I also live on the left coast in Whatcom County. I will be honest that I am probably a classic germ-a-phobe, especially since cancer entered my life. I have a college age son who lives with me and I worry about him bringing germs home from school (he claims everyone is sick and sniffling around him in class; and there is a large number of foreign students who returned from Christmas break) or from riding the bus (so I try to drive him as often as I can!).  I hate going to the grocery store during flu season. I find I isolate myself and have become much more of a hermit in the last two years.  So I get your concern - and my first thought(s) regarding this new virus turned to fear of a pandemic as well. When you are susceptible to respiratory issues, the news surrounding hits even closer to home.

My recommendation - if you haven't already - is to make sure you've received a flu shot AND pneumonia vaccine. I was never one to get the flu shot before. I now get a shot every year.  I actually got two different pneumonia vaccines - one prior to my lobectomy (Prevnar 13) and then my PCP recommended I get the one that covers 21 strains (and I'll need it again when I turn age 65 apparently).  If you haven't gotten either of those, I would highly suggest you look into them.  I try to follow all other recommendations (i.e. washing hands, not touching face, getting enough rest, drinking fluids, avoiding large, enclosed public places when possible,etc.). So far, I have not been sick since I had surgery in Oct 2018 with the exception of one quick onset head cold and fever that was gone in about 48 hours.

Yes - having the surgery is the best choice to make - in spite of "the backdrop of a burgeoning pandemic". I don't think you're being paranoid - probably just nervous, like the rest of us. I think once we are faced with this type of diagnosis we become much more aware of those things that present a threat to our happiness, health, well-being and existence.

Colleen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think having any kind of surgery makes you feel vulnerable.  I was petrified of getting a chest cold last year when I had my lobectomy.  A slightly higher level of concern crossed my mind when I heard of the Coronavirus.  My wife and I are going to Hawaii in February.  The plane and being there raised some concern for me.  I did end up getting a chest cold last year after surgery.  That wasn’t fun.  This year’s just a head cold.   I have three young children, I coach a couple of their teams  and my wife teaches first grade...so I’m in a Petri dish.  My middle son just got over the flu and my wife and two sons all have a cold and pink eye.  I’ve become much more diligent and do all of what Colleen mentioned to avoid getting sick.  I think it’s helped, up to this point I’ve avoided what the rest of my family has had.  One thing to keep in mind is that the surgery won’t make you more likely to get sick.  It just makes the respiratory symptoms a little more difficult.   I had some lymph nodes removed.  I do believe that makes it harder for my body to kick the colds I’ve gotten.  They linger a little longer than before.  

All that being said I’m glad I got the surgery.   If anything my added diligence probably helps me get sick less than before.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Colleen/Curt

I have never been afraid of getting sick, didn't get the flu shots and use to say one needed to "challenge" ones immune system.  I think I will be changing my ways.

Peace

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was in the same boat Tom.  I never liked taking medicine and never got the flu shot.  I viewed colds as something you should just fight off.  I’ve come to appreciate that I’ve “challenged” my body enough this last year and take the help where I can get it now.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ditto here.  Now I get the flu shot every year, plus had the pneumonia and shingle shots (the shingle vaccines were not for the feint of heart!!). As we get ready for our trip to FLA, I have high grade surgical masks, hand and face sanitizer too.  All of my plane clothes will go directly into the washing machine upon arrival.  

This morning one of the kids had a horrible chesty cough which sent me flying out of church like my hair was on fire.  

Is this crazy?  Nope! All of this I consider to be part of our new normal, we have to be super diligent about germ management.    

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michelle, Here's a suggestion about plane travel, or maybe you already do this. I wipe down my tray table, seat arms and plane wall (if I'm in a window seat), with antibacterial wipes. You can get some in small packets that can go in your 3-2-1 bag. I've had fewer colds after flying than I used to get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of good ideas about preventative measures to avoid flu, chest colds, pneumonia in this string. A chest cold for me puts me in very dangerous territory. My general practitioner insists I keep two kinds of antibiotics at home (and take them when I travel) Levaquin & Bactrim and I'm to start them as soon as my sputum darkens. Of course, then I beat feat to my doc but it might be a couple of days till I get to see him and he reasons he'll put me on these anyway.  Ask your GP to give you a basic load of just in case antibiotics.

Vaccines: flu, pneumonia (two types), shingles (two versions) are all a very good idea. Granted, the flu vaccine is hit or miss some years but I'd rather have it on board than chance catching it. When I fly during cold and flu season, I wear a surgical mask on the airplane. Doing so on the last two transatlantic flights may account for the fact that I arrived home without catching the crud at then end of our wonderful transatlantic cruises. My wife carries wipes and dishes them and insists I use them at a restaurant, before and after using a grocery cart, and after using an elevator. Of course, hand washing is vital.

Sunday afternoon, I just started symptoms of my first chest cold in two years. My wife had one last week and passed it on so I'm on antibiotics now and seeking a GP appointment. I think the fear of pneumonia now equals my fear of a recurrence. 

Stay the course.

Tom 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.