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My name is Doug.  I'm new to the group and just wanted to introduce myself.  I just turned 66, I'm currently dealing with the possibility of a lung cancer recurrence and the anxiety that comes with it.  I was diagnosed with NSCLS lung cancer 3B in 2008 and underwent radiation and chemo with good results at UCSF.  In 2017 we found a lung nodule that had grown and become malignant and radiated that pretty quickly with good results also.  My latest CT in March shows growth in two nodules in one lung, and an enlarged nodule in the other lung but they are still considered "ground glass."  My oncologist is telling me the growths may not be anything to be concerned about, but the scenario is kind of a repeat of what I went through in 2017.  I have several lung nodules, but haven't seen growth in that many at one time before.  My options for treatment are somewhat limited... due to extensive radiation my oncologist doesn't feel a lobectomy or complete lung removal is an option as he doesn't think I would survive it.  My next CT is in June.  I'm trying to keep busy (I'm retired, and have grown to hate it) to keep my mind off my health.  I'm hoping I can meet other people here or hopefully attend a support group with others dealing with the same issues. 

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Hi Doug, I am also Stage IIIB,  diagnosed in October 2019 at age 66. First, congratulations on having such great results from your earlier treatments. I also had chemo and radiation and then started a targeted therapy in March 2020. 

You may know that since 2008 and even 2017 great strides have been made in lung cancer treatments. We now have targeted therapy and immunotherapy as treatment options. A liquid (blood) biopsy might be able to detect the applicable biomarker. Of course, tissue biopsy remains the gold standard. In any event, biomarker testing is essential today. 

You're in a good city for expertise, but don't hesitate to get a second opinion. That's very common in cases of possible recurrence or change of treatment plan. 

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Hi Doug,

You've had a long journey my friend and any time recurrence is possible is a time filled with anxiety.  At this point there are likely a number of treatments available that weren't even five years ago.  Judy covered that pretty well.  In addition you can take a look at treatment options available today on our "Navigating Your Diagnosis" page and that can be found here.  There are many survivors of all LC stages on this forum and you'll be hearing from more of them soon.  In addition we also have Virtual Meetups for our folks, using Zoom, and you can register to join up on this page.  The folks on there are all survivors and just a wonderful group to be part of.

You won't need to go through this alone.  There are many of us here who'll make your journey with you.  I understand your anxiety very much and can only say that you are doing the right thing staying busy.  All the worrying in the world won't make anything better and can only weaken you through stress and lack of sleep.

Stay with us and I hope to see you on some of the Virtual Meetups.

Lou

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Doug,

Welcome here. I had 5 recurrences after "curative" treatment so I understand your predicament. I've found two things to be essential in battling lung cancer: patience and persistence. So...

Stay the course.

Tom

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Hi Doug,

I understand the worries. Lungevity has good opportunities to meet with other lung cancer folks. You see the calendar here and learn more about the Zoom opportunities. I meet monthly with a group of Lungevity folks with the same mutation(s) as me; it's helpful. (I see that LouT sent you to the description page of all the groups. 😉 It's nice that there's so many forms of information for us.)

I also found a local group that meets monthly via Zoom. It's good to have people I can text or call when a situation or question arises. I think I found them by asking the cancer center social worker. 

Hang in. 

Karen

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Hi Doug,

I can completely understand your fears, but fear not as lung cancer treatment has come a long way! First of all that's amazing that before the advances in treatment your treatment was so successful and the cancer has stayed away for that long! 

I'm confused about what happened nin 2017. Did the cancer return and you had treatment or was it a nodule that wasn't cancer? Even so you've achieved long lasting NED!

Surgery isn't an option for many with lung cancer but it doesn't mean that other treatments aren't effective or can't be successful. Surgery doesn't always equal a cure anyway. There's many choices of immunotherapies and targeted therapies and for those who can't have anymore radiation, there's a special type of treatment that can be used. I think it's called stereotactic radiation.

You doctor doesn't seem overly worried so try to stay calm. I know it's easier said than done but you've done amazingly well. I view you as a success story. Even if the cancer were to return, you can beat it again.

Keep us updated.

Monica 

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Hi Doug 

Sorry to here your going through this again it is really hard not to worry and stay strong but unfortunately there is no choice, everyone is right about the advances in treatment nowadays, unfortunately I think most of us go through the same journey as you and are constantly afraid of what's around the corner, you have had this for a long time now and definitely a survivor and a fighter so there is nothing stopping you beating whatever happens, there's some good stories and great people on this forum to talk with and everyone will try and help you through this 

All the best Take care Justin 

 

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Hi Doug

I am 59 and retired and loving it and about to head off travelling to make the most of everyday I have in my life. I read your post to introduce yourself which happened to coincide with the day I had a lobectomy of the top lobe of my right lung. I am by no means a fitness fanatic and my usual fitness regime would be carrying my cartons of beer from the car to the fridge in my workshop. I found the surgery to be no where near as bad as I was expecting and will be going home tomorrow. All I can say is try to keep a positive mindset as I feel this is our body and immune systems greatest weapon. Also have you considered other opinions apart from an oncologist. From the start I have been involved with a respiratory specialist who then referred me to a cardiothoracic surgeon to remove the tumor and then I went straight back to the specialist. I guess what I am suggesting here is do you have complete confidence in the opinions you are receiving or is it worth getting a second opinion? The treatment options are progressing so rapidly you need to be confident that you are getting the best possible advice. I am not offering advice here but only suggestions. You need to be happy that the information you are receiving is the best you can hope for.

Cheers

Mike

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I'm still getting used to the site, and can't find a way to reply to individual people who posted. 

Monica, yes, I had neuroendocrine lung cancer in 2008, was clear after treatment for just under 10 years and then during a routine CT scan in 2017 we found the nodule.  It was biopsied and found to be malignant.  I never got a cancer "type" from my oncologist, which I always thought was strange.  They just told me it wasn't neuroendocrine cancer but a cancer that was probably from my smoking history (I quit in 2008).

Mike, I have a friend who is seen at Stanford which has a great reputation and his doctor has offered to see me for a second opinion.  Right now I'm just waiting to see what my June CT shows.

Thanks again for everyone's replies.  The worst thing to me about dealing with this is feeling like no one understands, but these posts  remind me there are a lot of people who do.

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@dman415, if you enter the "@" sign along with someone's screen name, you will be able to tag that person in your post (like I just did with yours).

Even though everyone here may have different experiences and treatments, we certainly do understand, as you can see from the comments. 

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Just be sure to select the name that comes up automatically when you start typing it. There can be several choices to select from. It should appear in blue on your screen:  @Judy M2

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