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I recently read an article about, "White Tea.". I never heard of it. Has far more active cancer fighting antioxidants that green tea. Very little processing and no fermentation. Picked and harvested before leaves fully open. Leaves are steamed and dried in the sun. Its the least processed form of tea. It's expense about $3.50 an ounce for loose tea. I was in GNC recently and they have White Tea capsules which is many times more expensive than Green Tea capsules. Has anyone else heard of White Tea? I'm thinking about ordering a few ounces.

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Well I have been buying the White tea and Ginger line of products from Bath & Body Works but didn't realize there was really such a thing as white tea till reading your post. I just thought it was a name they dreamed up. I would like to try it. I can't drink green tea as it sends me into heart palpitations so maybe this will work.

Rochelle

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Ry -- even the decaf green tea gives you heart palps? Very odd!

I vaguely recall hearing about white tea (I think I might have read about it in Alternative Medicine Magazine) but can't recall what I heard/read!

I'm going to try to find the article tonight and see if I can come up with anything!

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Ry: You mentioned heart palpatation. Could it be the caffeine? A Quote:

"White tea are very lightly oxidized and have very, very, very little caffeine. The leaves & buds grown for white tea are actually picked the day before the shoots open which is attributed to the delicate nature and subtle qualities of white teas."

Also, there's an article on White Tea from the Linus Pauling Institute that's very interesting: lpi.oregonstate.edu/new/whitetea.html

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I compared green tea capsules to white tea capsules:

Green Tea Capsules: 315mg has 14% Polyphenols or 44 mg.

White Tea Capsules: 315mg has 90% Polyphenols or 283.5 mg.

I just ordered White Tea Bags from our local Vitamin Shoppe and should have it in a week. 20 bags = $3.63. It's called Long Life Organic White Tea. Although they don't sell on line the company has a website

www.long-life.com for information about it's products.

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Nope it's not the caffiene, I love that stuff. There is some ingredient (probably the antioxident that's so good for you) that sets my heart racing. Since I quit drinking it I haven't had a problem. Just my luck.

Rochelle

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  • 1 month later...
Guest bean_si (Not Active)

I just noticed this. I got Orange Blossom White Tea at Barnes & Nobles some time ago. It was 8.99 for 50 tea bags. Maybe it was partly due to my being on chemo and rad at the time but I really didn't like the taste. I recall it being more bitter than others. I think this is more or less the same as what you've been talking about: It says China White Tea. Says it's the most minimally processed of all teas and highest in anti-oxidants and polyphenols.

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Supposedly all tea is pretty healthy, but according to the articles published in the medical journals (I can't get specific which ones, cause I'm on so many lists) green tea still tops all for cancer fighting properties.

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Guest bean_si (Not Active)

Jean I both drink green tea (though not very often) and take capsules (though not often enough!) I'm afraid I'm one of those coca-cola addicts. :(

Cat

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just saw this on Dr. Weil's website -- it seems that Green Tea is listed as better for immune boosting, but White Tea has some interesting tricks of it's own! :wink:

Science and Supplement News: White Tea Bests Green for Bug-Busting

Green tea can boost the immune system, but new research shows that white tea – which comes from the same plant – may be even better for health: extract of white tea can help destroy bacteria and other organisms that cause disease. The new findings, from research at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences, showed that when added to toothpaste, white tea extract increased the anti-microbial effects and could help prevent cavities. White tea also has an anti-fungal effect. And, in a presentation at meeting of the American Society for Microbiology during the last week of May 2004, the researchers described other potential healing properties including retarding the growth of microbes that cause Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. White tea, imported mostly from the Fujian Province of China, is the least processed form of tea – to make it, leaves are simply picked and air-dried. In contrast, green tea is produced by picking, gently heating (steaming or pan firing), and drying the leaves.

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Guest bean_si (Not Active)

Interesting reading, Heather. If I could only get to like the taste. My palate is probably not educated enough. :lol:

I really appreciate all the info you bring to this board on nutrition, supplements and exercise, etc. I hope you continue.

We need you!

Cat

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