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Is anyone still smoking after this horid diognosis?

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Hi Jen, you won't find any ex smoker who will say it easy to quit. Many, such as I quit before we were diagnosed. You will never be able to quit until "YOU WANT TO", no support so called tricks or patches will do any good untill you TRUELY reach that point. All we can say is smoking is not going to help you beat this desease.

Be Tuff

jim

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Hi, can I add, You also have to believe that you can quit, believe that you can go through life without a cigarette, believe that you will actually feel better ( in a few days) without smoking. It has been 6.5 yrs since I had a cigarette and I will testify, to all of the above. Plus think of all the money I have saved ! besides my life. Donna G

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My husband quit after his lung xray and "the spot" that changed our lives. It was made easier by being in the hospital for a week before surgery because his lung collapsed after the needle biopsy, but he is adamant now that he will never go back. He had given up a number of times before but this is the first time I've seen this steely determination on his part. Before he didn't really "want" to give it up -- just thought he ought to. Now cigarettes, along with the lc, are The Enemy.

When he went to the doctor because of coughing up blood (which led to the xray which led to...), she gave him a prescription for wellbutrin, which, apart from its antidepressive qualities, has been proven to reduce the cravings for cigarettes. He never filled it because he ended up in the hospital with the collapsed lung, and he doesn't feel the need for it now, but I have it in the back of my mind if those cravings ever come back. You might check with your doctor to see if it would work for you (and not interfere with your treatment/other meds).

Good luck -- cigarettes ARE the devil!

Ellen

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I quit 23 years ago and used to say that it was the hardest thing I ever did...boy, was I wrong...dealing with LC is the hardest thing! I can't imagine even being able to smoke with my compromised breathing. I did it "cold turkey" and with a lot of prayer. I suggest you use whatever aids you can to make it easier. You'll get there and you'll be in a better place for this battle once you do. Best of luck.

Margaret

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My Dad and my husband were also given Wellbutrin to help quit smoking. My dad quit on his own a month prior to dx, and my husband took it faithfully and is still smoking. Maybe there is another drug that can help...patch, inhaler? Anything is worth a try.

Jamie

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Two years ago I tried to quit smoking and was doing very well on my own. Then my doctor said I really shouldn't be trying to do it without some help and he put me on Wellbutrin. It really didn't agree with my system very well. I had some severe mood swings and truly, for an anti-depressant, it depressed the %$^# out of me!! :roll:

Needless to say I went back to smoking.

Well...the day I had the biopsy to find out what that "patch" in my lung was all about, was the day I smoked my last cigarette. That was only 26 days ago...but I found fear to be a good motivator.

I heard somewhere....maybe it was here....that treatment works better if you can quit smoking. I want to give myself every shot at beating this thing....so I no longer smoke! Do I still reach for my pack sometimes? Yes. Do I miss a smoke after a meal? Yeah....although less and less each day.

I have gum here and nicotine patches...but have not had to use either one yet. They always say a person won't quit until they REALLY want to and are ready to quit. Well....I must have been ready because I have to say it's been easier than I thought it would be.

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Hi Jen,

You have to completely want to quit for yourself and no one else. You have to want to quit. I quit when I became sick on June 19, 2002. I just kept asking myself do you want to die, and the anwser of course was no, so I have not picked up another one. I told myself if I was going to fight this disease that I needed to quit. Why keep doing the same thing that made me sick in the first place. Don't get me wrong is was very hard. Sometimes when I had the most disturbing news is when the urge to smoke was the strongest. Sometimes I still want one, but again I ask myself that question do I want to live. STILL IT IS VERY HARD.

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Jen,

My "shadow" was found last January and I had subsequent tests, etc and they could not figure out what I had. I had to have a follow up CT in April to see if my nodule had grown and ended up having surgery last June.

I must be the last of the die hard smokers too because even after finding out that I had a "shadow" and all the subsequent tests, I could NOT stop smoking. It doesn't help that I have a highly addictive personality.I managed to cut down some for a bit but I was more stressed than I had ever been and during that time period still smoked. I was even in the smoking lounge at the Cancer Treatment Center of America the night before my lung surgery, chain smoking. Luckily, I was able to use the time after the surgery, in special care to "detox" from the damn nicotine.

Its been almost a year and I haven't smoked nor do I plan to. But like the others before me have said, some days it is very hard. I have no advice to you other than to do your best to quit... but don't beat yourself up because you still smoke. Just try every day.....you WILL physically feel so much better when you stop....If I could stop and stay stopped, anyone can, I promise!!!!!

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My husband had his last cigarette the day he had his first chemo he has not wanted one since and I all so have quit ,I am on wellbutrine and have been struggling for 4 years to quit. When he was dx with this monster thats when I quit. You can do it!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Hi Jen-

I quit smoking March 7, 2002 cold turkey when my sister was diagnosed. I just told myself I could smoke if I wanted to, but that I didn't want to. And then I thought to myself, if I was going to smoke, I would have done it yesterday. Just quit for one day at a time. Quitting forever seems like an eternity that is impossible. Just tell yourself in the morning I'm not going to smoke today and pat yourself on the back before going to bed for not smoking. It worked for me. Day 4 was the hardest. YOU CAN NEVER HAVE JUST ONE or you will never get past withdrawal. Visit www.whyquit.com for support.

Good Luck,

Kelly

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I quit cold turkey the same night I got that phone call from my doctor who said it's time to see a thoracic surgeon for an evaluation. I threw 6 packs away and it's been over a year now--May 21 at about 6pm was my one year anniversary.

It was very very difficult, but I thought if I was going to be able to beat this, the smokes had to go. That was confirmed when I did meet with the thoracic surgeon who said that the most important thing I can do to protect my health was to stay off the cigarettes.

He recently asked me how that was going and if it was still difficult. I said that every day has its moments where I could really go for a cigarette, but every night when I go to bed I'm glad I don't smoke anymore. I also know that there are days now where I barely even think about it.

I've had some weight gain issues that I don't want and don't need that I know are directly related to the smoking cessation, but I still would rather remain a person who has some health left and a closet full of clothes that don't fit than a smoker who is playing with fate all the time.

Believe me, if I can quit, anyone can quit--you will feel so much better when you do........good luck. It is tough, but it's so worth it.

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Sadly I have to say that my brother still smokes. He is a former alcoholic for some 30 years and had gone through alcohol withdrawal and seeing his family DR throughout that which has been a year and 1/2 now. That was a miracle in itself! His Dr who saw him through it all was talking to Alan just before he was dx with cancer and Alan told him he wanted to quit smoking.. it was a short 2 weeks later that that same DR had to tell him he had lc stage 4. The DR said to him "Alan, this is not the time to try to quit smoking". My only assumption was that his DR was afraid with the lc dx and having been free of alcohol for a year at that point was afraid if Alan tried to give up cigerettes he may go back to drinking. His liver had at least 30 spots of cancer on it and was thinking which was the lesser of 2 evils. I am not sure why but thats what I assume. His oncologist ( knowing he smokes heavilly) has never said a word to Alan about quitting!! Alan himself has said that every time he is in that chemo chair he swears he wont smoke after he leaves the hospital, but then does. He was recently in the hospital as the cancer has spread to his heart and was smoke free for 6 days and when he was released he smoked the same day. God only knows why as I dont! I know it would frighten me enough to never smoke again from the time I was dx on!! He has a lot of battles going on right now and I guess he feels like he cant be without his "best " friend and "Worst" enemy.

God bless you in your fight,

Jane

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Well I wasn't going to respond to this thread but I have one thought I want to contribute.

When I received my initial diagnosis it was from the absolutely least compassionate Dr I have yet seen. As he delivered the Dx he stated authoritatively that I would have 4 good months, 2 bad months and be gone. He said that there was nothing I could do which would affect the outcome either way. So I decided I didn't need the additional aggravation of quitting smoking on top of everything else.

I post this to help caregivers understand why in some cases, patients DON'T necessarily quit immediately upon Dx. Diagnosis is a terribly emotional time. This Dr left me the impression that I had already paid the price so I might as well take the path of least resistance. I got away from this Dr as fast as possible and haven't seen him since, for what it's worth... Just my pathetic tale.

Best Wishes, Dave S

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I think Dave S has a valid point--maybe some folks who continue to smoke feel that it is a lost cause and why bother now?

It sure is a time filled with anxiety, stress, tension, and sleepless nights, and we tend to gravitate towards things we feel give us comfort, namely smokes if you're a smoker.

I know with the breast cancer diagnosis, I would wake up in the middle of the night not being able to go back to sleep and would go sit on the patio and smoke and cry like crazy. Didn't really help, but that's what I did.

With this, I quit cold turkey and thought, if I don't now, will I ever? But I sure do understand the difficulty of it all--especially during the traumatic time of a diagnosis, testing, waiting for results, etc......

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Hubby quit the first day of chemo with Wellbutrin and patches. He stopped patches within a couple of weeks. He never had another cigarette. The Radiation Oncologist said smoking would really be bad on tender lungs getting radiation.

Lotsa people quit when hubby got diagnosed but as far as I know everyone started again. I quit for a couple of months but now I smoke a maybe 5 a day and not around hubby or in the house. If we are running around to appointments I don't even think of them but when I am home it is harder. Crazy, I know, but I too am very stressed right now and I feel like it is probably too late for me at this point. I will try again, I know I need to do it. I am being honest here, don't chide me.

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Countrygirl, it's not too late. You can do it, and you will feel better if you do. You've already cut back. And you are right; try again and eventually it will stick. Most people take several attempts before quitting for good. And if you relapse, so what? Quit it again, and again after that if you need to. Not giving up on it is what counts.

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Hey Countrygirl97! We were all looking for you recently.

I appreciate your honesty. I know how hard it is to quit too. I quit last year (20 year smoker) , and wanted to share a site with you that REALLY helped me. It's http://www.quitnet.com. I'm not affiliated with the site, but am a big fan. They have great message boards and a lot of information that helped keep me motivated. I started like you too and cut waaaay back first. I also used the patches.

Glad to see you back.

Gina

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Just keep trying. No matter how MANY times it takes, if you really want to, you will. (I know from my own and my familys experience)

God bless you and give you the strength that I know is inside of you.

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Guest Phyllis

I sympathize with anyone trying to quit. I don't want cigarettes too much anymore and wouldn't now. Sometimes I see someone smoking and the craving is overwhelming. The only way I quit was they knocked me out with morphine for about a month and took away my cigarettes. I swear that is the only way I could have done it.

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Jen!! there is no getting close to quiting!!!! Just do it. Do not keep any anywhere near you. Do whatever you have to do to keep away from them. You have a chance to beat this thing, do not ruin that chance by not quiting smoking. I smoked for 20 years and when I was diagnosed my doctor looked at me and said If you quit smoking you have a chance of being cured, if you continue to smoke you WILL die.

Yes it is hard but believe me you can do it. It's that pesky mind over matter thing again. Please reply with a post that says you have quit. Please, please, please, please.

David C

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