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LUNGevityKristin

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  1. Like
    LUNGevityKristin got a reaction from jack14 for a blog entry, AI can categorize lung nodules' cancer risk, study suggests   
    AI can categorize lung nodules' cancer risk, study suggests
    Katie Adams
    A new artificial intelligence algorithm can accurately assess the risk of cancer associated with indeterminate pulmonary nodules in patients' lungs, according to a study published in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
    Traditionally, physicians use CT scans to assess lung nodules, which can lead to earlier cancer diagnoses. However, this approach can also lead to overtreatment if nodules are benign.
    Researchers developed the algorithm to assess cancer risk based on data on 15,693 lung nodules from the National Lung Screening Trial, Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Oxford University Hospitals.
    Researchers found the algorithm was linked to a higher accuracy of predicted cancer risks. The algorithm accurately reclassified IPNs into low or high-risk categories in more than a third of cancerous and benign cases when compared to existing risk assessments.
    "These results suggest the potential clinical utility of this deep learning algorithm to revise the probability of cancer among IPNs aiming to decrease invasive procedures and shorten time to diagnosis," lead author Pierre Massion, MD, Cornelius Vanderbilt Chair in Medicine at Vanderbilt University, told the VUMC Reporter.
    Read the study here.
  2. Like
    LUNGevityKristin got a reaction from Tom Galli for a blog entry, Melanoma Immunotherapy Offers Hope for Lung Cancer   
    By Kim Polacek, APR, CPRC - April 27, 2020
     
    An immunotherapy that has demonstrated durable responses in patients with melanoma is now showing promise for those with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy, or “TIL,” uses a patient’s own live immune cells to fight cancer. Surgeons remove a patient’s tumor and, in the lab, dissect and culture the T cells inside. These cells, which were able to detect and invade the tumor, are then multiplied by the billions — a process that takes at least one month. Once infused back into the patient, the army of T cells can seek and kill the cancer cells.
    “We know many of the immunotherapies that work well in melanoma can also benefit lung cancer patients. With that in mind, a group of investigators at Moffitt Cancer Center initiated a trial to determine if non-small cell lung cancer patients could have a similar response to TIL therapy,” said Dr. Ben Creelan, principal investigator of the phase 1 trial and associate member of the Department of Thoracic Oncology at Moffitt.
    For the study, Moffitt recruited 20 patients with metastatic, non-small cell lung cancer. While their TIL therapy was being manufactured in the lab, they were treated with a different type of immunotherapy, a PD-1 inhibitor named Opdivo. Sixteen of the 20 patients saw tumor growth despite treatment with Opdivo. Those patients were then infused with personalized TIL therapy. 
    "When we launched the study, we never expected to see complete responses. That is very rare in lung cancer. However, two patients did achieve a complete response, meaning no evidence of disease on their scans, from the personalized TIL therapy. Another one had a complete response with Opdivo alone."
    Dr. Ben Creelan with Sheri Pummill, a lung cancer patient who had a complete response on the TIL therapy trial.
    “When we launched the study, we never expected to see complete responses. That is very rare in lung cancer. However, two patients did achieve a complete response, meaning no evidence of disease on their scans, from the personalized TIL therapy. Another one had a complete response with Opdivo alone,” said Creelan.
    He said several other patients on the trial showed partial response to TIL therapy, making the overall response rate from the study at least 25%. Complete results from the phase 1 trial will be presented during the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
    “Another interesting thing to point out is that biomarkers, such as driver mutations, do not rule out a potential benefit with TIL therapy. We have patients with several types of cancer mutations on the trial, and their clinical benefit seems to be independent of mutation type,” noted Creelan.
    Sheri Pummill's scans showing her response to TIL therapy. This is one of several lesions that responded to the therapy.
    Moffitt investigators are now looking at ways to make TIL therapy more accessible to more patients, both in terms of production time and tolerability. They are also researching how to enhance the TIL to increase the response rate. Moffitt is also opening Iovance Biotherapeutics’ clinical trial, which combines pembrolizumab with TIL for Stage 4 lung cancer.
  3. Like
    LUNGevityKristin got a reaction from Steff for a blog entry, Melanoma Immunotherapy Offers Hope for Lung Cancer   
    By Kim Polacek, APR, CPRC - April 27, 2020
     
    An immunotherapy that has demonstrated durable responses in patients with melanoma is now showing promise for those with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy, or “TIL,” uses a patient’s own live immune cells to fight cancer. Surgeons remove a patient’s tumor and, in the lab, dissect and culture the T cells inside. These cells, which were able to detect and invade the tumor, are then multiplied by the billions — a process that takes at least one month. Once infused back into the patient, the army of T cells can seek and kill the cancer cells.
    “We know many of the immunotherapies that work well in melanoma can also benefit lung cancer patients. With that in mind, a group of investigators at Moffitt Cancer Center initiated a trial to determine if non-small cell lung cancer patients could have a similar response to TIL therapy,” said Dr. Ben Creelan, principal investigator of the phase 1 trial and associate member of the Department of Thoracic Oncology at Moffitt.
    For the study, Moffitt recruited 20 patients with metastatic, non-small cell lung cancer. While their TIL therapy was being manufactured in the lab, they were treated with a different type of immunotherapy, a PD-1 inhibitor named Opdivo. Sixteen of the 20 patients saw tumor growth despite treatment with Opdivo. Those patients were then infused with personalized TIL therapy. 
    "When we launched the study, we never expected to see complete responses. That is very rare in lung cancer. However, two patients did achieve a complete response, meaning no evidence of disease on their scans, from the personalized TIL therapy. Another one had a complete response with Opdivo alone."
    Dr. Ben Creelan with Sheri Pummill, a lung cancer patient who had a complete response on the TIL therapy trial.
    “When we launched the study, we never expected to see complete responses. That is very rare in lung cancer. However, two patients did achieve a complete response, meaning no evidence of disease on their scans, from the personalized TIL therapy. Another one had a complete response with Opdivo alone,” said Creelan.
    He said several other patients on the trial showed partial response to TIL therapy, making the overall response rate from the study at least 25%. Complete results from the phase 1 trial will be presented during the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
    “Another interesting thing to point out is that biomarkers, such as driver mutations, do not rule out a potential benefit with TIL therapy. We have patients with several types of cancer mutations on the trial, and their clinical benefit seems to be independent of mutation type,” noted Creelan.
    Sheri Pummill's scans showing her response to TIL therapy. This is one of several lesions that responded to the therapy.
    Moffitt investigators are now looking at ways to make TIL therapy more accessible to more patients, both in terms of production time and tolerability. They are also researching how to enhance the TIL to increase the response rate. Moffitt is also opening Iovance Biotherapeutics’ clinical trial, which combines pembrolizumab with TIL for Stage 4 lung cancer.
  4. Like
    LUNGevityKristin got a reaction from Rower Michelle for a blog entry, Surviving Coronavirus as a Lung Cancer Survivor   
    With everyone on edge during the coronavirus pandemic, I wanted to share this story of a lung cancer survivor who has fully recovered from the virus.  
     
    Man who lost lung battling cancer survives coronavirus decade later
    https://bit.ly/39LM8Br
    BEAVER COUNTY, Pa. — A Pennsylvania man who lost a lung to cancer about a decade ago has survived another health battle -- this time, with the coronavirus.
    It started as what he assumed was just a cold, but when Richard Botti, 61, started to feel lung pain in early March, he thought his cancer had returned. It turned out to be COVID-19 instead.
    Because of his previous bout with cancer, he was at higher risk. His family told WPXI they got very concerned when his conditioned started to worsen.
    “It slowly got worse and he wasn’t getting out of bed,” said Vanessa Venezie, his daughter. “You immediately think the worst because of everything you’re seeing and reading.”
    He soon tested positive for the coronavirus and had to be hospitalized. However, he pulled through, spending 11 days at Heritage Valley Hospital hooked up to oxygen.
    Botti’s daughter wanted to share not all coronavirus outcomes are grim.
    “We’re just really happy and we want people to know there is hope for them,” Venezie said. “Stay focused on the positive. Do things that make you feel good. We can all get trapped in the negative.”
    Botti was taken back home by medics in an ambulance equipped to handle COVID-19 cases. He has to self-isolate in his room away from his family for two weeks.
    Watch video here: https://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories/man-who-lost-lung-battling-cancer-survives-covid-19-decade-later/OAU5PCE2HFHEPBDVJFRDS5PMJ4/

  5. Like
    LUNGevityKristin got a reaction from Tom Galli for a blog entry, Surviving Coronavirus as a Lung Cancer Survivor   
    With everyone on edge during the coronavirus pandemic, I wanted to share this story of a lung cancer survivor who has fully recovered from the virus.  
     
    Man who lost lung battling cancer survives coronavirus decade later
    https://bit.ly/39LM8Br
    BEAVER COUNTY, Pa. — A Pennsylvania man who lost a lung to cancer about a decade ago has survived another health battle -- this time, with the coronavirus.
    It started as what he assumed was just a cold, but when Richard Botti, 61, started to feel lung pain in early March, he thought his cancer had returned. It turned out to be COVID-19 instead.
    Because of his previous bout with cancer, he was at higher risk. His family told WPXI they got very concerned when his conditioned started to worsen.
    “It slowly got worse and he wasn’t getting out of bed,” said Vanessa Venezie, his daughter. “You immediately think the worst because of everything you’re seeing and reading.”
    He soon tested positive for the coronavirus and had to be hospitalized. However, he pulled through, spending 11 days at Heritage Valley Hospital hooked up to oxygen.
    Botti’s daughter wanted to share not all coronavirus outcomes are grim.
    “We’re just really happy and we want people to know there is hope for them,” Venezie said. “Stay focused on the positive. Do things that make you feel good. We can all get trapped in the negative.”
    Botti was taken back home by medics in an ambulance equipped to handle COVID-19 cases. He has to self-isolate in his room away from his family for two weeks.
    Watch video here: https://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories/man-who-lost-lung-battling-cancer-survives-covid-19-decade-later/OAU5PCE2HFHEPBDVJFRDS5PMJ4/

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