Jump to content

Update


Isunique

Recommended Posts

I have some questions for anyone. I have been diagnosed twice with lung cancer. The first time was in 2008, stage 1B, removal of the upper left lung (4/8/2008). All was good until 2017, diagnosed with stage 1A lung cancer, removed upper right lung (6/20/17). First CT scan since surgery, a nodule (lower right lobe) that was stable in the CT scan before surgery has now grown. They are wanting to do surgery again, a wedge lobectomy. With the holidays coming up I am pretty  sure nothing will be done until the new year. Has anyone had this much lung removed? 

Honestly, I am scared, and my husband is scared. The waiting is the hardest part.  I have been trying to get back on track with my diet to try to lose the extra weight I put on, but I am a nervous eater. Shoot, I was even running again and was able to run a mile without having to walk any.

I think the part that gets to me is that I was really trying to get healthy after 2008. I lost a lot of the weight, starting working out and running and walking on my lunch time. It took me a long time, but I did 2 ½ marathons.  I actually ran once for 10 miles, which I never thought that I would be able to do, ever.

Also, I want to fly down to see my children in Alabama, but not sure about the lack of lungs in a pressurized cabin.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isunique,

My mom has only had her right upper lobe removed and I do not know any others personally who had lobectomies or wedge resections.  I did read an article  2 years ago about a younger woman who had her entire left side of her lungs removed due to cancer.  She was very active before surgery, running marathons, similar to you.  It took her awhile, but she was able to run her first marathon a year or two after her surgery.  

I can tell you that at the time of my mom's lobectomy, she was obese and inactive.  After surgery, she went to pulmonary rehab (exercise at her hospital) and now breathes better that she did prior to surgery because much of the emphysema she had was removed with the lobectomy.  The truth is, a doc can't tell any of us how well we will breathe after the surgery.  We were told to expect some change in the ability to do physical activity, but they could not tell us how much.  Is your new lung cancer a different type than your first or is this a recurrence of your old cancer?  If it is a recurrence and you want to consider another option before/instead of surgery, be sure to talk to your doc about immunotherapy.  My mom is on Keytruda and this immunotherapy is now first line treatment for NSCLC patients with a high amount of cells with a gene mutation called PD-L1.  It is also being used for NSCLC recurrence in patients with a lower level of cells with PD-L1.  

I have always been a fan of "cut it out of me", but if there are valid concerns about your breathing after the resection, I would definitely talk to your doc about alternative treatments.

Take Care,

Steff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a lower left lobectomy and upper left wedge resection at the same time and i dont notice any lack of breathing abillity so hoefully you wont either 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks,  If my lung capacity is good enough they will want to do surgery. They told me that is the preferred method. The cancer this time is still from the upper right lung, since it was so long in between cancers they are treating this one has a new cancer. I have an appointment with the surgeon next week so I will now more then.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isunique,

I've live very successfully with but one lung and of that only about 38% total lung capacity.  I don't run marathons but I'm not tied to oxygen and get around quite well.

One thing to be careful of, however, is the proximity of surgery to your flight to see your family.  Aircraft pressure altitude does not lower oxygen levels to the point where breathing is difficult, but cabin pressure does cause my incision scars to ache, more than normal.  This is because the lower pressure causes everyone's body to expand and that expansion irritates my incision scars.  I have a lot of incision scars and this may not be a problem of yours down the road but be careful of flying too soon after thoracic surgery. Be sure to tell your surgeon about the timing of your travel plans.

Stay the course.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.