Jump to content

Food for Thought


Kasey

Recommended Posts

Not sure this is the place for this post......none of the forums seemed right. But since smoking is often discussed as the cause of LC, I thought this interesting.

Teddy's (my dog in avatar) best buddy up the street, Tucker, was dx with lung cancer just a few months ago. Tucker outlived his prognosis of 30 days and made it to 60. Tucker was a 7 yo German Shepherd. Tucker was a never smoker and did not live with second hand smoke. Not even any of the neigbors smoke. He never frequented smoky cabarets either. So.........HOW did Tucker get lung cancer?????? Murphy, my canine companion before Teddy, developed lymphoma. He received chemo and lasted 2 more years. There seems to be a higher than average # of cancer cases in this neighborhood. We don't have radon and aren't near any chemical plants.

I just found Tucker's case one of interest. I wonder IF there will ever be an answer to HOW one gets cancer...........lung cancer in particular. But sure hope no one tries to blame Tucker's on smoking somehow.

Kasey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It IS food for thought....and it makes a great case that there just isn't an easy explaination for cancer.

There are instances that make us more susceptable to developing cancer, but in lung cancer's case, blaming it soley on smoking either directly or indirectly has limited and stunted funding and research efforts.

There is a GREAT piece in the CURE magazine this issue that addresses these same issues and the smoking stigmas.

Thanks for the food for thought Kasey...I love the way you think and I am so sorry that Teddy lost his friend.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just found this.

IX. Lung Cancer

Lung cancers are fairly rare in dogs though the number has been increasing. It is not known, however, whether the increase is real or a result of improved techniques to detect lung cancer in dogs.

Male and female dogs get this cancer at roughly the same rate. There may be a slight increase in risk associated with living in an urban area. Short-nosed breeds exposed to cigarette smoke in the home have twice the risk of getting lung cancer as medium- or long-nosed breeds exposed to a similar amount of cigarette smoke. This is, of course, the inverse of the nasal cancer findings and again speaks to the more efficient nasal filtration system in long-nosed breeds.

Cancer of the lining of the lungs (mesothelioma) is associated with exposure to asbestos in dogs just as it is in humans. The owners of dogs with this type of cancer were more likely to be exposed to asbestos at work or in their hobbies.

Donna G

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, Donna, you are really on top of this one! Teddy taught ME how to do chemo. Fred actually took his vacation (it was my first week back to school in the fall......they weren't looking very kindly on me taking off to take the dog to chemo) so he could drive him the one hour to the specialist and sit with him. SHE is a wonderful vet ~ attends oncology conventions all over the world for HUMANS. Maybe you can google that too, Donna, just WHAT it is that makes some of these tx for dogs valuable info for humans. If I recall, she said it is something about or in the dogs that most closely resembles a human. At any rate, Murphy responded well and lived 2 more very good years. Wish Tucker had been so lucky.

Kasey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THeir bodies are very close to ours anatomically. THat is what Daisies Vet told me once when she was diagnosed. Daisy's vet was State director of Veterinarian services once in her career.

http://www.oncolink.org/types/section.cfm?c=22&s=69

everything you wanted to know! Well almost everything. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If their bodies are close to ours anatomically, I wonder if any one has looked into whether people with large noses are less likely to get lung cancer than those with short noses?

Donna G

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kasey,

You may have answered part of your own question, "FOOD FOR THOUGHT".

Dogs consume some of the same food additives that we do. They drink the same chlorinated water and many other things. These have all changed greatly over the last 75 years. I think they make a difference.

Stay positive, :)

Ernie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.