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The last CT scan showed no change in the size or shape of the tumor but two small white areas which the Oncologist thinks are evidence of a lung infection on that side. She was put on 2 weeks worth of antibiotics and will see the Oncologist for follow-up on August 3rd.

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PET scan revealed no active cancer anywhere in her body.  Nothing lit up, not even the old tumor.  Next task is to get rid of this "lung specialist".

needs to get the Water up at the very least ... Dehydration is a partial couse of this I think.... and is treatable at hospital with lots of fluids....  She should be eating whenever hungry.. not set

  • 2 weeks later...

Multiple new dense patchy areas of opacification are noted in the left
upper lung field, potentially malignant, inflammatory, or infectious
related. There, again, is a pleura-based, irregular mass in the right
posterior apex, measuring minimally smaller.

 

That was on the final report of her July 2015 chest CT. I'm not sure what any of this means. She was treated with 2 weeks on a hefty antibiotic and since that treatment has occassional unproductive cough and is short of breath with any exersion. She'll be going back to the cancer center next Tuesday.

 

The shortness of breath could be caused by whatever is going on with the lungs, her low blood pressure, or dehydration.  Any thoughts?

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BlueWolf, is there a Nurse Navigator  or Social Worker that you are connected with? She or he may be able to explain these test results more clearly. I'm glad to read that her pain is gone. 

How are you doing?

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I'm nervous but otherwise okay CindyA.  The lung "specialist" doesn't know what it is either. He said it could be a fungal infection which they did a blood test for today. It could be blood clots in the lung (which shes first getting tested for on Monday because there is a "special test" they do to look for blood clots that wouldn't be seen in the two CT scans shes had in the last month), or it could be cancer which is the first thing her Oncologist ruled out. So....

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above 90 is rpetty good... My mom without LC BTW dropped to 82 one day and now she is  on O2 since she breathes through her mouth. now she breathes through her nose and is above 90.... sxee if this link might have some helpful info!!!

 

http://www.lungcanceralliance.org/what-if-i-am-diagnosed/side-effect-management/shortness-of-breath-dyspnea.html

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I just had a chat with the PA at the cancer clinic and she thinks it is scar tissue due to the radiation. She feels that the prednisone and antibiotics will help it but that the scar tissue will never completely go away. We pretty much have no choice but to go through these tests on Monday and Thursday of next week and hope that the increase in prednisone helps her. If not I will have to take her to the hospital ER and see what they can do to help her. Her O2 sats were 94, no one can hear anything when they listen to her lungs (no "rails" or whatever else they hear when something is wrong), no bluish nail beds or lips....as a friend said to me its not like we have been to a foreign country or anything so there is no excuse that no one knows what this is.  She has had 22 blood tests in the last week and a half because she also lost 2 points on her hemoglobin and had to get a pint of blood last week. She's had 2 chest CT scans with contrast dye and a chest x-ray as well in the past month. Thank God for Medicare.

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Well since the Oncologist ruled out cancer last month, if something does show up as being positive I will have a LONG chat with the Oncologist and make certain it really is cancer before they subject her to more chemo. Last time she got chemo things didn't work out too well.

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PET scan will not be done because insurance wont pay for it. Now we are just going to wait for the head lung specialist to return from vacation since the guy my sister was seeing doesn't have a clue what is wrong with her.  ALL of the tests have come back normal and/or negative. The Oncologists PA thinks this is scarring from the radiation. That actually seems feesable but I have no clue how this is treated or even IF it is treated.

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BlueWolf,

 

I read your post history of your sister's treatment.  On 13 August, you posted a radiologist's description of a recent CT scan and asked what the description meant.  Here is a website that I've used in the past to understand my radiology impressions - http://www.radiologyassistant.nl/en/p50d95b0ab4b90/chest-x-ray-lung-disease.html

 

I've had all kinds of unusual CT and PET scan findings.  One CT reported by a radiologist in a local hospital on emergency admission scared the daylights out of the ER physician.  A quick doctor-to-doctor consult with my oncologist calmed things down a lot.  Radiographic interpretation is indeed difficult.

 

The PET scan would have clarified the situation but for Medicare.  Sadly, lung cancer has this unfortunate stigma of self-inducement that tamps down diagnostics and treatment that other cancer survivors normally benefit from.  I wrote my congressman and senators a nasty letter about Medicare'd denial of PETs.  It didn't change things, but perhaps if we all start pinging our elected officials, things might change.  They did approve low dose CTs for at risk lung cancer patients.

 

Now for some suggestions.  My after scan consultations with my oncologist consisted of my oncologist reading and explaining the radiologist written report.  No film was ever used.  I once had an area of concern in my empty right cavity (post pneumonectomy) after a CT that the radiologist report suggested new metastatic disease.  The word "opacification" was used in the radiologist interpretation.  My oncologist called me before the consult and told me the opacification area was located in proximity to my incision scars - a site of chronic pain.  We asked him to obtain the film for the consult.  During the consult, my wife and I with the oncologist and senior scan technician looked at the film and concluded the reported area was indeed in the immediate area of my incision scars.  So, sometimes asking your oncologist to obtain the actual film as an explanation vehicle is helpful.  It did earn me another CT and the opacification was no longer present.

 

Stay the course.

 

Tom

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