Forums

  1. WELCOME NEW MEMBERS!

    1. INTRODUCE YOURSELF!

      Please introduce yourself here and then move on to the many other forums!

      33,436
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  2. SURVIVOR STORIES

    1. SHARE YOUR LUNG CANCER STORY

      These are the inspirational and personal stories of the LUNGevity LCSC members.

      2,089
      posts
  3. DISCUSSION FORUMS

    1. GENERAL

      General discussion about all things lung cancer.

      96,718
      posts
    2. LC SURVIVORS

      A forum for anyone diagnosed with lung cancer, those in treatment and those who are not, to express their thoughts and issues from a patient's perspective.

      9,012
      posts
    3. NSCLC GROUP

      This is where thoughts or issues regarding NSCLC and sub-types of NSCLC can be found. Support is here for anyone facing this diagnosis.

      41,389
      posts
    4. SCLC GROUP

      This is where thoughts or issues regarding Small Cell Lung Cancer, extensive or limited stage can be found. Support is here for anyone facing this diagnosis.

      16,005
      posts
    5. LUNG CANCER MUTATIONS

      A forum to discuss anything related to lung cancer genetic testing and gene mutations.
      Share any news related to this topic here

      16
      posts
    6. IMMUNOTHERAPY

      Information, news and peer support

      38
      posts
    7. CAREGIVER RESOURCE CENTER

      FAMILY MEMBERS/CAREGIVERS: Air your feelings and get support and encouragement from others who have been co-survivors. Post and share resources for caregivers here

      30,443
      posts
    8. PALLIATIVE CARE

      Information about palliative care. Learn about palliative care for lung cancer survivorship and share resources here.

      6
      posts
  4. LUNG CANCER Q & A

    1. LUNG CANCER NAVIGATOR

      Do you have general questions about lung cancer? Post them here! We will reply with links and resources. This forum & site are NOT substitutes for professional medical advice. Please read all site disclaimers and consult your treating doctor about everything you read on the internet.

      33
      posts
    2. LUNG CANCER 101

      ALL expert blogs, podcasts webinars and expert events from LUNGevity and our experts will be posted here.

      454
      posts
  5. NEWS / ADVOCACY

    1. LUNG CANCER IN THE NEWS

      News posted here may not necessarily be endorsed or supported by LUNGevity in anyway, should NOT be taken as medical advice and are for informational purposes only.

      8,108
      posts
    2. CLINICAL TRIALS

      NEW TREATMENTS, TARGETED THERAPIES, RX info links &/or CLINICAL STUDY information may be posted here.

      2,968
      posts
    3. FOUNDATION NEWS

      News about LUNGevity, press releases, news about our volunteers, coordinators, event and initiatives.

      122
      posts
    4. ADVOCACY

      Advocate, raise awareness, participate in events and find volunteer opportunities in this forum.

      3,949
      posts
    5. CONFERENCES

      Conferences that are of interest to people impacted by lung cancer

      6
      posts
  6. LIVING WELL

    1. HEALTHY LIVING / RECIPES

      Nutritional information, exercise, diet and therapies. Links and newstories that may be beneficial to health and survival may be posted here. No advertisements.

      493
      posts
    2. HOPE

      Inspire us with your good news and hopeful articles!

      35,729
      posts
    3. JUST FOR FUN

      A forum for jokes, word games, and fun postings. "Air" your days events or concerns in the Daily "AIR".
      {Fun Found Here!}

      41,900
      posts
  7. SUPPORT / GROUPS

    1. SUPPORT RESOURCES

      Suggestions, links, recommendations and tools to help support you during the lung cancer journey

      51
      posts
    2. SUPPORT GROUPS

      Find local support groups and/or post your groups here.

      433
      posts
  8. GRIEF / RESOURCES

    1. GRIEF

      For anyone who has lost a loved one to LC. Post general updates, memorial notices and tributes here.

      42,014
      posts
  9. ABOUT THIS MESSAGE BOARD

    1. FEATURES AND SUPPORT

      You can create your own blog, chat, and more! Learn the basics and ask site support questions here.

      1
      post
    2. TERMS OF USE

      Terms of use and disclaimers are posted here. They can also be found in the REGISTRATION AGREEMENT that every member accepts when registering to post on this message board.

      2
      posts
  • Member Statistics

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  • Recent Discussions

    • Mary, On diagnosis, I had a single tumor in my main stem bronchus measuring about 7 cm long and about 2.5 cm in diameter.  It was so large, it couldn't be biopsied with a flexible bronchoscope.  My thoracic surgeon performed a cervical mediastionscopy biopsy to confirm the type of lung cancer as Squamous cell.  He also removed a large number of lymph nodes but thankfully, each showed no signs of disease. The first finding, despite no lymph node involvement, was no surgery because the tumor was too large and too close to my trachea.  My medical oncologist and thoracic surgeon cooperated to administer first line conventional radiation (30 treatments) and 6 infusions of adjunct taxol and carboplatin to shrink my tumor and give the surgeon access to remove my right lung.  That treatment worked but unfortunately and predictively, suture healing was affected by the pre-surgical radiation and chemotherapy and that resulted in a year's worth of additional surgery to correct a bronchopleural fistula.  Because of this complication, I did not receive post surgical chemotherapy and missing this treatment was a likely cause of three tumors discovered in my remaining lung about 3 months after my last surgery, my first recurrence. Then I had 6 more infusions of taxol and carboplatin and scans showed no evidence of disease (NED) and I remained disease free for about a year.  But two tumors returned to my left lung.  I had another course of 6 taxol and carboplatin infusions hardened by the oral chemotherapy drug Tarceva and again was found to be NED.  However once again, one tumor returned to my left lung.  Finally that was fried by stereotactic radiation (CyberKnife) and I've been NED since.  So I had three recurrences, all to my left lung.   Yes, there is a stigma about lung cancer.  Thankfully, it was never displayed by my doctors but some who learned about my disease blamed me for giving it to myself.  I likely did, but data shows about 18% of diagnosed lung cancer occurs in people who never smoked.  I can't change my past and if people want to blame me for my disease, then so be it, but I don't buy into their blame.  In today's politically correct world, all I need to do to shut these small-minded people down is cite HIV/AIDS and drug abuse as self administered and ask why they don't blame these folks.  It is crude but effective. I am alive and even after nearly 13 year of living after diagnosis, I still see my medical oncologist 2 times per year.  Lung cancer is persistent and I still have a high probability of recurrence.  So, to the operative question: how does on live with a life threatening disease that has a high probability of recurrence.  Here is how I do it. I forget the past.  I can't change it and forgetting is vastly better then mentally rehashing all my treatment nightmares.  I've declared the future irrelevant.  I have no control over what happens to me in the future and worrying won't change that.  Therefore, I live in the day and I try and find something, often a little thing, that brings me joy to celebrate life.  When I find it, like this morning's first cardinal at the bird feeder, I enjoy the experience.  I also try and help people diagnosed with lung cancer because if I can live, so can you. I believe there are two ways of thinking about lung cancer.  I can be down in the mouth and believe it is a disease of death and morn my death while still living, or I can believe it is a disease of life.  I choose the latter.  I don't know when I will die, nor do I know what will cause it.  We all die; why worry about what causes it. You've got a lot on your plate Mary.  If you want to, you can clear off some of the clutter.  If I can live, so can you. Stay the course. Tom
    • hi tom im having a central line put in october 11th and back on chemo the 13th so figures crossed do you mind me asking where your cancer reoccured. ya i feel there is a stigma that comes with lung cancer as i have tryed for local support groups with lung cancer suvivors havent found any yet surely they must be some, i will keep trying. Think my husband is showing fear on display at present and also my kids but we will get passed this, so glad your wife is so supportive a true angle without wings im sure my husband and kids will step up too just like last time we all had a rough couple of years my mom passed away last year from a stoke and my husband had a heart attack at the same time he had 5 stints put in i think were all very scared and in shock at present slowly im thinking bring the beast on so i can win this battle
    • Mary, Pemetrexed is a new formulation that I didn't receive.  I did however have more than my fair share of carboplatin, in combination with taxol and this combination therapy knocked down my tumors 3 times.  I do hope your adenocarcinoma qualifies for targeted therapy.  So let's see if we can help our your coping problem.  Here are some strategies with coping with infused chemotherapy that I discovered. 1. Remember, chemotherapy very often produces extended life.  Don't make my mistake and fail to take advantage of this extension.  You are choosing treatment and therefore life. Do something enjoyable with it. 2. A port is often helpful in avoiding assault by IV device.  During my second bout with chemo, my veins went into hiding.  Think about having one installed to reduce the drama of infusion. 3. The only good thing about side effects is they recur at nearly the same time after each infusion.  Chart the onset on a calendar to the hour.  My doc told me if I took prescribed side effect medicine shortly before the onset of side effects, they'd be less disruptive.  He was right. 4. If you have to take pre-infusion steroids in pill form and your are given infused steroids before chemo, there is this symptom we call 'roid rage.  Steroids caused two problems with me - hunger and sleeplessness the night after infusion.  So prepare.  My wife took me out infusion night for a wonderful dinner, and I settled in to a good book to pass the sleepless hours.   My family didn't want to speak about cancer either.  My father hardly spoke to me, but my wife stepped up to be my caregiver and guarding angel.  People don't know what to say to those diagnosed with cancer, especially lung cancer.  They are afraid of saying the wrong thing so they say nothing or they avoid interacting with you.  This is fear on display.  But you've found us and we know exactly how you feel and welcome you to this online forum.  You might also look for a cancer support group in your town or city.  They are often associated with treatment centers.  People in support groups know exactly how you feel. Stay the course. Tom