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Hello all.  New member here.  LynnA.  Glad I found you. Just got DX. Although the cancer, Lung Adenocarcinoma, has been in my lungs since at least 2014.   If anyone knows anything about this kind of cancer I sure would appreciate any information that you can share about it.   My managed care plan found it back then but told me it was just scar tissue.  Said they would keep an eye on it.  NOT.  BUT, I finally found a better medical center and they got on the ball immediately. I got hit with asbestosis in 2006.  I was a quartz fuser for the micro electronic industry for 12 years (the 1970's).  I've been fortunate for ten years.  Cancer free, I thought.  Talk about Murphy's law, my artwork is finally taking off.  I'm getting into galleries and this hits.  LOL  But I'm a fighter and still have a lot of art in me.  

 

I do a PET scan tomorrow to find out what stage I'm in.  I'm a little frustrated with my Pulmo.  She told they were getting me right into surgery to get the cancer out.  Now they are doing the PET scan first to see how far the cancer has progressed.  I found that out by accident when I called her office.  I need to let her know that I would like to be kept up to date on any change that pertain to this process. And so it goes.....  the work begins. Lessons on assertiveness.   Criminy, I'd rather make art and play guitar.  

But I guess I can do all three. Learn, make art, and music.   How long I can do so depends on me, I'm a fighter,  and what little surprises they find in my body tomorrow.  It is what it is.  Thank you for listening. 

thank youfern.jpg

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Good morning, Lynn.  Glad that you found us.  So PET scan today to look for any metastisis - good.  Hopefully it is contained in your lungs and you'll be a lower stage.  Definitely ask your questions.  This is your medical team and you have to feel comfortable with them and know that you can get answers.  Do you have anyone that can accompany you to appointments?  Most of us have found that a second set of ears is a good idea with so much new information being thrown at us.  Have you had a biopsy? If so, did the lab test for any mutations?  If the tumor has certain markers, you may be a candidate for targeted therapy.  

I'm stage IV adenocarcinoma coming up on 2 years since diagnosis.  I didn't have any markers so I went the traditional chemo route.  

Let us know how we can help you.

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Good morning fellow Washingtonian!

I'm glad to hear you are a fighter, I think that's one of the most important things when it comes from beating lung cancer.  My mom is currently battling a NSCLC recurrence, adenocarcinoma as well.  Her first go around with treatment (chemo and radiation) wasn't too bad, but her second go of chemo was pretty tough on her. But she has completed that and is now just receiving Keytruda - an immunotherapy drug.  She found that she was a good fit for Keytruda from the tests they did of the biospy - like Susan was referring to.  Over the past few years, there have been lots of last minute, "secret" changes like you have experienced with your doc.  Me being the control freak I am have not dealt with those very well.  The last minute changes for my mom are usually due to getting an answer from her oncologist or pulmonologist while in the exam room, but when they get together and discuss the issue, a new option arises that is usually much better. So I've learned to try to accept it and go with the flow.  I hope that with time, you can begin to trust your medical team, but if that time does not come, you should definitely consider looking for other docs.  We also found that once the ball got rolling for surgery, treatment, etc, there were less surprises from our docs.  I'm hoping that will be your experience as well. 

Finally, I want to refer you to the informational pages of Lungevity https://www.lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101/types-of-lung-cancer/lung-adenocarcinoma

Lungevity, by far, has the best information that I have found out there.  Don't pay too much attention to statistics you may see on other sites, those are based on patients who did not have the access to the wide range of lung cancer treatment that is available now.  The truth is, folks are living longer and fuller lives with the different treatments that are available. And new clinical trials are starting everyday.  And my thought has always been, if one person can survive this, so can my mom.  She is a fighter like you.  

Take Care,

Steff

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Thank you, all three of you.  I'll write more tomorrow. The PET scan knocked me out.  They did do my neck two times.  Mentioned something about lymph nodes.  Knowing the nodule was first spotted, but ignored in 2014, I' pretty much expecting metastasis.  I"ve always been a very lucky Lady - born 7/11,  but I won't push it.  :-D  Thank you again for responding. It's a pleasure to meet you all.  I just wish it was under different circumstances.     I wish you all the best with your journey also. G-night.

 

 Lynn A

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On 2018-02-15 at 6:37 AM, Steff said:

Good morning fellow Washingtonian!

I'm glad to hear you are a fighter, I think that's one of the most important things when it comes from beating lung cancer.  My mom is currently battling a NSCLC recurrence, adenocarcinoma as well.  Her first go around with treatment (chemo and radiation) wasn't too bad, but her second go of chemo was pretty tough on her. But she has completed that and is now just receiving Keytruda - an immunotherapy drug.  She found that she was a good fit for Keytruda from the tests they did of the biospy - like Susan was referring to.  Over the past few years, there have been lots of last minute, "secret" changes like you have experienced with your doc.  Me being the control freak I am have not dealt with those very well.  The last minute changes for my mom are usually due to getting an answer from her oncologist or pulmonologist while in the exam room, but when they get together and discuss the issue, a new option arises that is usually much better. So I've learned to try to accept it and go with the flow.  I hope that with time, you can begin to trust your medical team, but if that time does not come, you should definitely consider looking for other docs.  We also found that once the ball got rolling for surgery, treatment, etc, there were less surprises from our docs.  I'm hoping that will be your experience as well. 

Finally, I want to refer you to the informational pages of Lungevity https://www.lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101/types-of-lung-cancer/lung-adenocarcinoma

Lungevity, by far, has the best information that I have found out there.  Don't pay too much attention to statistics you may see on other sites, those are based on patients who did not have the access to the wide range of lung cancer treatment that is available now.  The truth is, folks are living longer and fuller lives with the different treatments that are available. And new clinical trials are starting everyday.  And my thought has always been, if one person can survive this, so can my mom.  She is a fighter like you.  

Take Care,

Steff

 

On 2018-02-15 at 6:37 AM, Steff said:

Good morning fellow Washingtonian!

I'm glad to hear you are a fighter, I think that's one of the most important things when it comes from beating lung cancer.  My mom is currently battling a NSCLC recurrence, adenocarcinoma as well.  Her first go around with treatment (chemo and radiation) wasn't too bad, but her second go of chemo was pretty tough on her. But she has completed that and is now just receiving Keytruda - an immunotherapy drug.  She found that she was a good fit for Keytruda from the tests they did of the biospy - like Susan was referring to.  Over the past few years, there have been lots of last minute, "secret" changes like you have experienced with your doc.  Me being the control freak I am have not dealt with those very well.  The last minute changes for my mom are usually due to getting an answer from her oncologist or pulmonologist while in the exam room, but when they get together and discuss the issue, a new option arises that is usually much better. So I've learned to try to accept it and go with the flow.  I hope that with time, you can begin to trust your medical team, but if that time does not come, you should definitely consider looking for other docs.  We also found that once the ball got rolling for surgery, treatment, etc, there were less surprises from our docs.  I'm hoping that will be your experience as well. 

Finally, I want to refer you to the informational pages of Lungevity https://www.lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101/types-of-lung-cancer/lung-adenocarcinoma

Lungevity, by far, has the best information that I have found out there.  Don't pay too much attention to statistics you may see on other sites, those are based on patients who did not have the access to the wide range of lung cancer treatment that is available now.  The truth is, folks are living longer and fuller lives with the different treatments that are available. And new clinical trials are starting everyday.  And my thought has always been, if one person can survive this, so can my mom.  She is a fighter like you.  

Take Care,

Steff

I use the same thing over the years with doctors who never carry watches go with flow

 

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