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LisaM

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Hi. My name is Lisa and my husband George has just been diagnosed with Stage IV NSCLC after it was discovered by accident (large mass in RT upper lobe). The have found a met in his adrenal gland. He has been completely asymptomatic. He had his first dose of chemo on Friday 3/28/08 of carboplatin and gemzar. It went well, just a little tired now. He's scheduled for a second dose 4/4/08 of just the gemzar. Is the chemo cumulative? Is he going to feel bad after Friday's dose because right now he's okay.

The plan is to try 3 rounds of chemo , repeat the PET scan and if all is well, do surgery.

We're both struggling to process everything as it has happened so fast (good?). I'm looking for all kinds of info and help- he doesn't want to know anything. Is this normal?? It's a nightmare. :cry:

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Hi Lisa. Yes nightmare is a good word for it at the beginning. But it sounds like they got to treatment very fast. It does get better. Chemo can be cumulative but everyone's experience is different. Make sure he drinks lots of water. Take care, you have come to the right place for support and information.

Sandra

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Hi Lisa-

Welcome to our board. I am very sorry about your husband's diagnosis and I know how shocked and devastated you both are. Chemo does get harder each time but it is doable. My husband felt tired and blah usually the 3rd day following chemo so we scheduled chemo day around that so he could feel better by the weekend. Make sure your husband drinks lots of water before, during, and after chemo as it will help with the body aches from the Gemzar. Even if he can't eat, he needs to drink as much as he can.

You should also get a second opinion if you haven't' already just to make sure you are on the right track and not missing anything.

I hope all goes well and the gemzar works for him.

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Welcome Lisa. Yes, it is very good that he's into tx so quickly. I never had Geemzar, so cannot comment on that particular drug, but everyone reacts differetnly anyway, so keep that in mind. I didn't have too bad a reaction to my taxol/carboplatin. Some fatigue, but mostly achiness all over ~ especially the joints.

Ry's suggestion of a second opinion is one that would be echoed by most of us here. I actually had 4 opinions and I don't regret that one bit. It's good to know if all the experts are on the same page, you know? Since hubby really doesn't wnat to know, I hope you remain vigilant and proactive for him. In today's times, it is more important than ever before to take charge of one's own care. Good luck and hope you stay around for the support availabale here.

Kasey

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Hello Lisa and welcome

So sorry you had reason to find a site like this one but very glad you have joined.

I agree with Ry and Kasey on the second opinion and definitely on the drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration is no fun.

Please keep us posted on George and his treatments and let us know how we can help you.

Warmly

Christine

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Welcome. I had a different combo of drugs. With mine the clinic always made sure I had lots of meds for nausea relief etc and pushed Ensure and the like. So glad a plan is in place promptly and the possibilty of surgery is so promising! Keep us posted.

DonnaG

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Hi, Lisa, welcome to the LCSC! It sounds as if your husband is getting excellent and timely medical care, and the fact that he's feeling well is another big plus. Some chemo effects are cumulative, while others do not seem to be. I haven't had Gemzar so can't give any personal perspective on that, but with Taxol/Carboplatin I found some of the side effects occurred mainly in the early cycles then diminished, while others gradually built up and didn't resolve until some time after those drugs were finished. Everyone is different!

I'm looking for all kinds of info and help - he doesn't want to know anything. Is this normal??

It's hard to say what's "normal" when it comes to cancer, but I have seen that pattern a number of times in this group. It's important that SOMEONE (presumably you in this case) is proactive, stays on top of things, and isn't afraid to make a few waves if the need arises. About your husband's approach, could he be a little bit in denial? If it's not that, maybe he simply wants to emphasize the positive over the negative and apply whatever mental energies he can to building up his body's own natural processes (Google "apoptosis" and read the Wikipedia article). That's my approach too, but I like to dig into the details as well. We males for the most part try to project a strong, in-control image, but it should come as no surprise to you that we are at least as complex and conflicted as the opposite gender! :lol: Aloha,

Ned

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Hi Lisa-

Sorry you had to find yourself here but this is a great place to come for information and hope.

I have never had Gemzar myself, but I can tell you that everyone is different. I have just finished my 24th chemo and the cumulative effects are just now starting to slow me down a bit. I was also blessed with no real side effects from chemo - no nausea, vomiting etc. Hopefully your husband will be the same way.

Ask any question you want - there will be tons of info we can give you to help you through this journey.

Hugs - Patti B.

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Thank you all for the encouragement and the warm welcome! It's nice to have someplace to go- our friends and family are great but , thankfully, they haven't had to deal with this directly.

We actually have gotten a second opinion and everyone is agreement that it's best to treat with chemo first and then proceed with surgery ( provided the repeat PET scan doesn't show any new spots). The onc thinks that given his age and good health ( no meds or other health issues) that he is a good canidate for surgery.

I'm not really sure if George is in denial or just overwhelmed by it all. I work in the medical field so I understand a lot of what is being said but they may as well be speaking Greek to George. He has always relied on me to be the translator and take care of this kind of stuff. He is optimistic and feels much better knowing he doesn't have any mets in the brain. I think he finally realizing he can fight and win.

Thank you all for your support!!

Lisa

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Hi Lisa,

I am sorry to hear about George's diagnosis. I remember when they told me I had LC and would have part of my lung removed.....as soon as the doctor said the word, the room started to spin and I wasn't sure if I was going to pass out or throw up. The doc had my head between my knees in no time.

Eventually I came back to earth and faced reality but it took me a while - I was definetly in denial.

Personally I wouldn't get too concerned about your husband not wanting to know anything right now. Everyone processes the news differently.

I have my fingers crossed that the chemo continues to go well for George.

Wendy- 4 yr nsclc survivor

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