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Curt

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  1. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in I’m so happy I found you all!   
    Hi Susan.  I’m three weeks post op from an Upper Right lobe lobectomy.  I’m glad to hear you are doing well a year later.  It gives me hope. The day after the surgery the hospital told me I had to walk a mile a day if I wanted to go home.  I did that religiously while there.  Since home I’ve been doing 30 minutes on the treadmill (it’s too cold to be outside) slowly increasing my walking speed and incline.  I’m up to a mile and a quarter in 30 minutes on a slight incline.  It’s a long way from a 7 minute mile but who cares.   It’s more about how I feel afterwards, not how far or fast I went.  One bonus to having lower lung capacity is that you can get your heart rate going with less effort.  Higher heart rate equals more cardiovascular exercise, with less effort.  That’s the math I’m using anyway.
    I’m not sure if you feel this way but when I exercise it is a pretty strong reminder of the fact that I had cancer and lost a part of my body because of it.  That reminder stings.  I’m hoping it lessens with time but I can imagine a lot of frustration comes with those reminders.  I’m choosing to not focus on the why I’m not able to do what I use to and focus more on how much improvement I’m  able to achieve now.  I’m focused on recovering from the surgery and improving.  I’m obsessed with the spirometer and getting as close to my preop lung capacity as possible.   I hope I can keep up that perspective long term.  I’d like to get back in a Montauk bike this summer   
    Lungevity has some endurance events you may want to look into when you feel ready.   https://lungevity.org/events/team-lungevity-endurance-events
    Its awesome you are interested in getting back into running.  Go with how you feel during and after running, that’s what’s most important.  Not how far or fast you go.  
  2. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in judiles   
    Judiles,
    Welcome here and so very sorry to learn of your husband's diagnosis.  Wow, 18 months of back pain, that is a lot to put up with.
    Oncologists come in two flavors: the medical oncologist and the radiation oncologist.  Of these the medial oncologist is the generalist; they see and treat all kinds of cancer primarily with chemotherapy. The radiation oncologist specializes in radiation therapy using ionized radiation or accelerated protons. Both my medical oncologist and radiation oncologist practiced in the same clinic but there is no need for proximity to have successful treatment.  Radiation oncologists tend to be colocated with hospitals because the radiation or proton generating equipment is expensive and often found in hospitals.
    My medical oncologist was captain of my lung cancer team.  After 15 years of surviving lung cancer, he still is and I see him twice a year.  I'll likely have oncology consultations for the rest of my life because lung cancer often recurs after treatment so follow-up is prudent.
    It sounds like your husband's doctor is using radiation as a palliative means to reduce his back pain. Ten cycles suggest he is receiving precision radiation; that is IMRT, IGRT or SBRT. I had SBRT as my last treatment and it worked. This is a good plan and there is no problem with the order of treatment.  I'd rather have my pain eliminated before chemo. Here are some tips and tricks that may assist with his chemotherapy.
    You mentioned a biopsy.  Did you receive a diagnosis, that is a type of lung cancer? It may be small cell or non small cell which is further classified as adenocarcinoma, Squamous cell or large cell.  Knowing the diagnosis will allow us to help you with chemo side effects and provide the basis of our experience in treatment.
    Stay the course.
    Tom
     
  3. Like
    Curt reacted to Karen.athome in update and anyone know or heard about this???   
    I'll go through my reports and notes...and get back to you...as soon as I can.
    That's the confusing thing....you aren't really sick....until...you're really sick.
    Sounds like you're on top of things....must be exhausting for you.
    Take a breath for yourself every now and then....
     
     
  4. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Rower Michelle in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    It’s different for everyone and depends a lot on your lung capacity before surgery.  Exercising and doing breathing exercises before surgery helps.  I was really surprised about how little the surgery affected my breathing, even immediately after.  The only time I noticed any differences was when I would walk around the hospital wing.  After a few laps I’d get winded quicker.  There was no pain when breathing, just shortness of breath when being active.  I did exercise and use the spirometer a lot after surgery to minimize the differences.  I still am.  
  5. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    It’s different for everyone and depends a lot on your lung capacity before surgery.  Exercising and doing breathing exercises before surgery helps.  I was really surprised about how little the surgery affected my breathing, even immediately after.  The only time I noticed any differences was when I would walk around the hospital wing.  After a few laps I’d get winded quicker.  There was no pain when breathing, just shortness of breath when being active.  I did exercise and use the spirometer a lot after surgery to minimize the differences.  I still am.  
  6. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    It’s different for everyone and depends a lot on your lung capacity before surgery.  Exercising and doing breathing exercises before surgery helps.  I was really surprised about how little the surgery affected my breathing, even immediately after.  The only time I noticed any differences was when I would walk around the hospital wing.  After a few laps I’d get winded quicker.  There was no pain when breathing, just shortness of breath when being active.  I did exercise and use the spirometer a lot after surgery to minimize the differences.  I still am.  
  7. Thanks
    Curt got a reaction from Moonbeam in CT Scan   
    Good news on the clear scan.  I hope all goes well with the vascular surgeon.  
  8. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Roz in 3 Week Lobectomy Follow Up Tomorrow   
    Thank you @Suzanne Gibb.  Welcome here, but sorry you have to be.  I read your other post.   I don’t have any experience with radiation treatment but there are others that do that I’m sure will respond.  It was too cold to go outside after my surgery so I took to cleaning the house to be active.  Keeping the house in order felt good when the rest of my life was feeling quite a bit out of order.  Good luck with your treatments.    
  9. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Roz in Medical Marijuana   
    I believe that medical marijuana has a limited amount of THC (the part that gets you high) and more CBD “Cannabidiol”, the part that helps with pain.  I have friends who are successfully treating chronic pain with CBD oil. It is definelty important to consult with your doctors to make sure there are no potential negative interactions with your treatment and MM.   
  10. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    VATS stands for Video Assisted Thorascopic Surgery.  It is a less invasive way to perform a lobectomy.  They make three, sometimes four smaller incisions and remove the lung laparoscopically.  A VATS surgery has a quicker recovery time and you should have less pain and discomfort.  I had a VATS lobectomy.  I would do it again without hesitation if I had to.    
  11. Thanks
    Curt got a reaction from Moonbeam in CT Scan   
    Positive thoughts 🙏 
  12. Like
    Curt reacted to Suzanne Gibb in 3 Week Lobectomy Follow Up Tomorrow   
    Thanks Curt. I do agree with you about keeping the house in order especially with two dogs. It is also not too strenuous yet. Suzanne
  13. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Suzanne Gibb in 3 Week Lobectomy Follow Up Tomorrow   
    Thank you @Suzanne Gibb.  Welcome here, but sorry you have to be.  I read your other post.   I don’t have any experience with radiation treatment but there are others that do that I’m sure will respond.  It was too cold to go outside after my surgery so I took to cleaning the house to be active.  Keeping the house in order felt good when the rest of my life was feeling quite a bit out of order.  Good luck with your treatments.    
  14. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Irka in Session at Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute, Lancaster PA   
    Sounds like a great team.  An MRI and PFT are standard testing.  I agree with Michelle re MRI. It is confining. I haven’t tried one, but the stand up MRI’s look a lot less confining.  
  15. Like
    Curt reacted to Hament in Chemo and immunotherapy along with Radiation for SCLC   
    Yes we have changed onco team as previous one was more or less interested in palliative care while his new onco team is going with curative intent..keep up the spirit you will be playing golf very soon.
    Hoping for speedy recovery for you also
    Hament
  16. Like
    Curt reacted to Rower Michelle in Session at Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute, Lancaster PA   
    Hi Irka!
    So nice to hear from you!  I’m thrilled that you landed in the right place.  Sounds like you’ve got the start of a great team in place.  Diagnostics are critical in the development of an effective treatment plan.  
    I get happy meds for the brain MRI (aka Valium).  I don’t like closed in spaces or the actual noise, then I take a long nap.  
    You might want to ask about what holistic services the clinic offers such as yoga.  
    In this case being registered with a cancer center means membership has many benefits! 
    Keep us posted!
    Michelle
  17. Like
    Curt reacted to Irka in Session at Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute, Lancaster PA   
    Dear Lungevity Friends,
    Here’s a recap of my fairly long session on Tues, Apr 16, with Dr. Cziserle, the thoracic surgeon I saw at the Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute in Lancaster PA. (I prepared this for my immediate family members & thought I’d share it with you all as well.) Dr. Cziserle thoroughly reviewed my case with me & my husband Ken, pointing out on my CT scans the 3 nodules (one in particular) in my right lung that, although smallish, are of concern. He then ordered two additional tests: a brain MRI (to make sure no screws are loose!!!) & a Pulmonary Function Test. These are necessary to get a fuller picture of my condition & possible treatment options.  Before proceeding with any treatment, however, Dr. Cziserle & 11 of his colleagues (including oncologists, radiologists, etc.) will examine my case.  They meet each Thurs to discuss individual cases & reach a general consensus on how best to proceed.  (I've already started to refer to them as the “twelve apostles!”)
    The doctor & assistants & everyone we encountered were very welcoming.
    And yesterday I had a phone call from one of the assistants at Barshinger.  She has already set up those appointments for me on Thurs, Apr 25, so Dr. Cziserle gets the results in time for my next appointment with him on Tues, Apr 30.  He also indicated I'd get another CT done next month.
    This facility appears to be top-notch!
     
  18. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    Hi Lucilori,
    I agree with  Curt's suggestion that you ask for an explanation for the recommendation for surgery when your biopsy and PET scan were both inconclusive. My single small nodule was discovered in a routine CT scan that was done to watch for possible metasteses from a prior non-lung cancer. They recommended a re-scan in 3 months and that scan showed slow growth. It did not "light up" on the PET scan. Due to its location, it couldn't be biopsied by needle or bronchoscope. Due to it's spiculated (spiky) appearance, it looked to the various specialists like a primary lung cancer (and not a metastasis from my otheer cancer). I had s VATS lobectomy and my recovery was fairly easy.  It turned out to be cancer, adenocarcinoma stage 1a. I was 71 and in pretty good health at the time of my surgery. Now two and a half years later I have No Evidence of Disease (NED). I don't have any remaining effects from the surgery other than my breathing sounds a bit funny at times..
    If your doctors aren't clear about why they think  your nodule is likely to be cancer, or if you're not convinced, you could get a second opinion.
    If you have more questions, post them and somebody on these forums will probably have answers. Collectively, we've been through a lot!
    Bridget O
     
  19. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    Hi Lucy.  Given both tests being inconclusive I understand why you are concerned with both options of treatment.  Did the doctor tell you why they felt you should pursue those treatments?   Are there other characteristics of the nodule that concern them?   Has it grown, is it spiculated, it is located in a concerning location?  I had an 8mm nodule that was too small to biopsy.  It also did not light up on a PET scan.  My nodule was spiculated, in a concerning location and I have a significant family history of lung cancer.  Given those reasons my doctor also recommended I do a lobectomy.  I had the surgery 2 months ago. My nodule turned out to be lung cancer but the majority of nodules (around 60% are not cancer).  I don’t require any follow up treatment.  
    Typically they will do what is called a wedge resection to remove the nodule, test it right then and there and proceed with a full lobectomy if it is cancer.  Recovery from a lobectomy is different for everyone.  I’m 43 years old and in reasonable health.  I have very few residual issues from the surgery.  Most are just irritations that I expect to go away as opposed to things I believe will be long term issues.  I have a lump/tickle in my throat that makes me cough.  I have some never discomfort on my side where the incisions were.  I have sole tightness in my chest when I cough or sneeze.  My lung capacity is less, but not less enough to stop me from doing my normal activities.  My doctor said unless I was planning on running a marathon I wouldn’t notice any lifestyle differences.  The recovery from surgery was also not terrible either.  A lobectomy is considered a curative treatment for early stage lung cancers.   My grandmother was treated with radiation for lung cancer when she was in her 80’s. Her doctors felt it was a better option than surgery given her age.  She passed in her 90’s from unrelated causes.  
  20. Like
    Curt reacted to Eagle13 in EGFR - Tagrisso ( osimertinib)   
    Almost 8 months on Tagrisso now.  Scans showing no progression and stabilized.  Everyday is a new normal.  Managing the side effects and able to do things I could not before Tagrisso.
    🦅
  21. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in Husband newly diagnosed - looking for support   
    Hi Stacey.  Welcome.  I’m glad you found us but sorry you had to.  I am 43 years old, never smoker and had a right upper lobe lobectomy via VATS a little over six weeks ago.  I had the same images of being frail and walking around on oxygen as your husband has.  I don’t have any residual breathing issues.  I’m able to run, play in the yard with my kids and be active.  I do get out of breath quicker than I use to but I’m motivated to get back to 110%.  I had Stage 1 NSCLC Adenocarcinoma.  I don’t require any follow up treatment, just periodic CT scans for monitoring.  
     
     
     
  22. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Rower Michelle in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  23. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Tagrisso EGFR   
    Io uso Google Traduttore. La mia bisnonna paterna è passata dal cancro al seno o ai polmoni. I record non sono chiari. La mia nonna paterna aveva un cancro ai polmoni ed era stata trattata con radiazioni negli anni '80. Passò di cause non correlate nei suoi anni '90. Mio padre e quattro delle sue sei sorelle avevano un lungo cancro. Tutte tranne una di quelle sorelle sono passate. Anche mio padre, suo fratello e una delle sorelle avevano i sarcomi dei tessuti molli. Recentemente sono stato disgnosed con NSCLC Adenocarcimona. Ho avuto una lobectomia in alto a destra per rimuoverlo. Non ho bisogno di alcun trattamento di follow-up, solo scansioni periodiche. Sto facendo testare il mio intero genoma per eventuali mutazioni genetiche della linea germinale. Spero di avere presto questi risultati.
    Ti incoraggerei a smettere di fumare. È una buona scelta di vita indipendentemente dal cancro. Da quello che so mutazioni genetiche ereditarie della linea germinale per il cancro sono molto rare. C'è più ricerca in corso su di esso, ma c'è ancora molto da imparare.
    Translation...
    I use Google Translate.  My paternal great grandmother passed from breast or lung cancer. The records are not clear. My paternal grandmother had lung cancer and was treated with radiation in her 80's. She passed of unrelated causes in her 90’s. My father and four of his six sisters had long cancer. All but one of those sisters have passed. My father, his brother and one of the sisters also had soft tissie sarcomas. I was recently disgnosed with NSCLC Adenocarcimona. I had an upper right lobectomy to remove it. I do not require any follow up treatment, just periodic scans. I am having my entire genome tested for any germline genetic mutations. I hope to have those results back soon.
    I would encourage you to stop smoking.  It is a good life choice regardless of cancer.  From what I know hereditary genetic germline mutations for cancer are very rare.  There is more research being done on it, but there is lots still to be learned.  
  24. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  25. Like
    Curt got a reaction from PaulaC in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
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