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Curt

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  1. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    Hi Lucilori,
    I agree with  Curt's suggestion that you ask for an explanation for the recommendation for surgery when your biopsy and PET scan were both inconclusive. My single small nodule was discovered in a routine CT scan that was done to watch for possible metasteses from a prior non-lung cancer. They recommended a re-scan in 3 months and that scan showed slow growth. It did not "light up" on the PET scan. Due to its location, it couldn't be biopsied by needle or bronchoscope. Due to it's spiculated (spiky) appearance, it looked to the various specialists like a primary lung cancer (and not a metastasis from my otheer cancer). I had s VATS lobectomy and my recovery was fairly easy.  It turned out to be cancer, adenocarcinoma stage 1a. I was 71 and in pretty good health at the time of my surgery. Now two and a half years later I have No Evidence of Disease (NED). I don't have any remaining effects from the surgery other than my breathing sounds a bit funny at times..
    If your doctors aren't clear about why they think  your nodule is likely to be cancer, or if you're not convinced, you could get a second opinion.
    If you have more questions, post them and somebody on these forums will probably have answers. Collectively, we've been through a lot!
    Bridget O
     
  2. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in Cancer -Scared to Death   
    Hi Lucy.  Given both tests being inconclusive I understand why you are concerned with both options of treatment.  Did the doctor tell you why they felt you should pursue those treatments?   Are there other characteristics of the nodule that concern them?   Has it grown, is it spiculated, it is located in a concerning location?  I had an 8mm nodule that was too small to biopsy.  It also did not light up on a PET scan.  My nodule was spiculated, in a concerning location and I have a significant family history of lung cancer.  Given those reasons my doctor also recommended I do a lobectomy.  I had the surgery 2 months ago. My nodule turned out to be lung cancer but the majority of nodules (around 60% are not cancer).  I don’t require any follow up treatment.  
    Typically they will do what is called a wedge resection to remove the nodule, test it right then and there and proceed with a full lobectomy if it is cancer.  Recovery from a lobectomy is different for everyone.  I’m 43 years old and in reasonable health.  I have very few residual issues from the surgery.  Most are just irritations that I expect to go away as opposed to things I believe will be long term issues.  I have a lump/tickle in my throat that makes me cough.  I have some never discomfort on my side where the incisions were.  I have sole tightness in my chest when I cough or sneeze.  My lung capacity is less, but not less enough to stop me from doing my normal activities.  My doctor said unless I was planning on running a marathon I wouldn’t notice any lifestyle differences.  The recovery from surgery was also not terrible either.  A lobectomy is considered a curative treatment for early stage lung cancers.   My grandmother was treated with radiation for lung cancer when she was in her 80’s. Her doctors felt it was a better option than surgery given her age.  She passed in her 90’s from unrelated causes.  
  3. Like
    Curt reacted to Eagle13 in EGFR - Tagrisso ( osimertinib)   
    Almost 8 months on Tagrisso now.  Scans showing no progression and stabilized.  Everyday is a new normal.  Managing the side effects and able to do things I could not before Tagrisso.
    🦅
  4. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in Husband newly diagnosed - looking for support   
    Hi Stacey.  Welcome.  I’m glad you found us but sorry you had to.  I am 43 years old, never smoker and had a right upper lobe lobectomy via VATS a little over six weeks ago.  I had the same images of being frail and walking around on oxygen as your husband has.  I don’t have any residual breathing issues.  I’m able to run, play in the yard with my kids and be active.  I do get out of breath quicker than I use to but I’m motivated to get back to 110%.  I had Stage 1 NSCLC Adenocarcinoma.  I don’t require any follow up treatment, just periodic CT scans for monitoring.  
     
     
     
  5. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Rower Michelle in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  6. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in Tagrisso EGFR   
    Io uso Google Traduttore. La mia bisnonna paterna è passata dal cancro al seno o ai polmoni. I record non sono chiari. La mia nonna paterna aveva un cancro ai polmoni ed era stata trattata con radiazioni negli anni '80. Passò di cause non correlate nei suoi anni '90. Mio padre e quattro delle sue sei sorelle avevano un lungo cancro. Tutte tranne una di quelle sorelle sono passate. Anche mio padre, suo fratello e una delle sorelle avevano i sarcomi dei tessuti molli. Recentemente sono stato disgnosed con NSCLC Adenocarcimona. Ho avuto una lobectomia in alto a destra per rimuoverlo. Non ho bisogno di alcun trattamento di follow-up, solo scansioni periodiche. Sto facendo testare il mio intero genoma per eventuali mutazioni genetiche della linea germinale. Spero di avere presto questi risultati.
    Ti incoraggerei a smettere di fumare. È una buona scelta di vita indipendentemente dal cancro. Da quello che so mutazioni genetiche ereditarie della linea germinale per il cancro sono molto rare. C'è più ricerca in corso su di esso, ma c'è ancora molto da imparare.
    Translation...
    I use Google Translate.  My paternal great grandmother passed from breast or lung cancer. The records are not clear. My paternal grandmother had lung cancer and was treated with radiation in her 80's. She passed of unrelated causes in her 90’s. My father and four of his six sisters had long cancer. All but one of those sisters have passed. My father, his brother and one of the sisters also had soft tissie sarcomas. I was recently disgnosed with NSCLC Adenocarcimona. I had an upper right lobectomy to remove it. I do not require any follow up treatment, just periodic scans. I am having my entire genome tested for any germline genetic mutations. I hope to have those results back soon.
    I would encourage you to stop smoking.  It is a good life choice regardless of cancer.  From what I know hereditary genetic germline mutations for cancer are very rare.  There is more research being done on it, but there is lots still to be learned.  
  7. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Tom Galli in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  8. Like
    Curt got a reaction from PaulaC in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  9. Like
    Curt got a reaction from eric byrne in My Introduction   
    Hi Lou.  Welcome.  Sorry you are here but glad you found this site.  I had an upper right lobe VATS lobectomy six weeks ago.  I went in for a wedge resection to remove an 8 mm nodule, they tested it while I was still under, determined it was Stage 1 Adenocarcinoma NSCLC and the doctor moved ahead with the lobectomy.  I don t require any follow up treatment, just periodic scans.  My nodule was found a year ago also by chance on an abdominal scan.  I am not a doctor but given the growth, previous history and the 2.3 SUV on the PET the course of action you describe seems appropriate.  Good news is that surgery can be a very effective treatment, even cure. Make sure it’s a VATS surgery if possible.  That will make recovery easier than an open surgery.  The recovery from the VATS surgery hasn’t been terrible and the quality of life changes have been minimal after just six weeks.  I expect to get back to 100% at some point.  
    Cancer and anxiety go hand and hand.  The last year was one of the most stressful of my life.  You’ve found a good place to ask questions , lean on people with similar experiences and to contribute.  All three are welcome.  
  10. Like
    Curt reacted to Forrest J in Tagrisso EGFR   
    Hi, All,
    I don't know if the EGFR mutation is genetic, but I believe it is. As it stands today, In the US Tagrisso is now (since 4/2018) considered the best first line of defense/attack against metastasized NSCLC. Terceva was the therapy of 1st choice prior to this. However, I do not  think Tagrisso has been found effective against breast cancer yet. I am still doing OK, many tumors have shrunk. I feel good many/most days and exercise daily. All the best everyone! By the way, off of Decadron--it brought many unwelcome side effects.
  11. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in My Introduction   
    Hi Lou.  Welcome.  Sorry you are here but glad you found this site.  I had an upper right lobe VATS lobectomy six weeks ago.  I went in for a wedge resection to remove an 8 mm nodule, they tested it while I was still under, determined it was Stage 1 Adenocarcinoma NSCLC and the doctor moved ahead with the lobectomy.  I don t require any follow up treatment, just periodic scans.  My nodule was found a year ago also by chance on an abdominal scan.  I am not a doctor but given the growth, previous history and the 2.3 SUV on the PET the course of action you describe seems appropriate.  Good news is that surgery can be a very effective treatment, even cure. Make sure it’s a VATS surgery if possible.  That will make recovery easier than an open surgery.  The recovery from the VATS surgery hasn’t been terrible and the quality of life changes have been minimal after just six weeks.  I expect to get back to 100% at some point.  
    Cancer and anxiety go hand and hand.  The last year was one of the most stressful of my life.  You’ve found a good place to ask questions , lean on people with similar experiences and to contribute.  All three are welcome.  
  12. Like
    Curt got a reaction from eric byrne in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  13. Like
    Curt reacted to eric byrne in My Introduction   
    Hi Lou,
    Its a pleasure to meet you,I am happy to chat with you anytime it suits you.I did travel around the USA on Amtrak in 2011 for 7 weeks,with the encouragement Of our dear friend Katie here, I kept a daily diary of my adventures,you can still find my diary on my website Travelling Eric.I have also a couple of films in You Tube, one of my LUNGevity charity walk around Lincoln Park Seattle,where at the end of it a microphone was pushed into my hand and asked to give a little talk about myself, it comes under the heading Eric Byrne Lung Cancer Survivor. Another film was Eric Byrne Stop Smoking where some students in the college I taught in were filming something called Healthy Working Lives,they asked me if I would agree to be filmed for the series,well we must support our students,so i guessed it would take the form of a Q&A interview but no,they just set up their camera  and a microphone and said,Eric,tell us about your cancer journey.Well,its unprepared,unscripted but I did my best to encourage the viewers who do not smoke not to start and those who do smoke to stop.Its really been my mission as well as speak up where ever I can in appeal for better LC research funding.
    Best Wishes,
    Eric
  14. Like
    Curt reacted to Tom Galli in New italian caregiver   
    Ale,
    Benvenuto.
    È possibile una remissione completa con il carcinoma polmonare in stadio IV?
    Non usiamo il termine di remissione nella comunità del cancro ai polmoni. Speriamo che i risultati del trattamento non presentino evidenza di malattia o NED. Nella malattia di stadio IV, ci sono un certo numero di tumori metastatici. Il trattamento può eliminare questi tumori? Sì.
    Tuttavia, dovresti tenere presente che tua madre potrebbe aver complicato le condizioni mediche che influenzano il trattamento. Inoltre, il cancro ai polmoni è persistente e spesso si verifica un numero di cicli di trattamento prima di raggiungere il NED.
    Ciò che è ragionevole e molto possibile è che il trattamento prolungherà la vita di tua madre. Per quanto? Nessuno lo sa, ma il miglior consiglio è godersi l'estensione della vita.
    Mantenere la rotta.
    Tom
    Translation....
    Welcome ale,
    Is a complete remission possible with stage IV lung cancer?
    We don’t use the term remission in the lung cancer community. We hope treatment results in no evidence of disease or NED.  In Stage IV disease, there are a number of metastatic tumors. Can treatment eliminate these tumors? Yes.
    However, you should be mindful that your mother may have complicating medical conditions that affect treatment.  Moreover, lung cancer is persistent and one often experiences a number of treatment cycles before achieving NED.
    What is reasonable and very possible is that treatment will extend your mother’s life. How long? No one knows but the best suggestion is to enjoy the life extension.
    Stay the course.
  15. Like
    Curt reacted to LouT in My Introduction   
    Eric
    Thanks for sharing your story. Along with the others I've heard, it gives me hope for the future. I'll admit I'm very concerned about recovery, post-op limitations, and recurrence. I just retired 2 years ago and had an optimistic picture of how my wife and I would spend time in this part of our lives.  When I read a story like yours,Lexie and others  it brings a spark of that optimism back.  I'm working hard on staying positive and do better some days more than others. 
    Finding this forum is a blessing to me at this time.  Thanks again for the words of hope. 
    Lou
  16. Like
    Curt reacted to Ld1978 in Hello   
    Hi Lauren
    Thanks for asking. Recovery is going well apart from he didn’t do as he was told and caught a cold and cough off the kids. I guess mental health is as important and he didn’t want to stay home. It’s made him a little breathless but he has some antibiotics which are helping.
    he had his follow up and no more cancer and no further treatment needed so that’s really positive and great news for him.
    im hoping things will just get better and better but for 81 he is doing amazingly 
  17. Like
    Curt reacted to eric byrne in My Introduction   
    Hi Lou,welcome to LCSC,I live in Scotland and had a upper right lobectomy in January 2009,your descriptions of your surgery experience does bring back memories to me.I had a drain port placed in my back post surgery which was removed prior to leaving hospital.I didnt have the benefit of key hole surgery ,which incidentally was pioneered by a surgical team in Scotland.I did have some aches with my scar for some weeks post surgery,pain is too strong a word,this ache disapeared imperceptively over the weeks.In Scotland we dont do post surgery CT scans,just a X-ray and check up every six months for 5 years post surgery.At my last visit 5 years post surgery,my oncologist told me he had every confidence that I was  cured,now go away I dont expect to see you again.Now over 10 years later I have a full and active life,I enjoy every minute,now have  a grandson someone at one time never thought I would never have met.I have a new partner in my life Liz,we have been together for 5 years,she has two grandchildren,a boy and a girl,all the grandchildren visit regularly with their parents of course,although we are often used as babysitters including the children staying with us overnight.I have bought a holiday home in Albir Spain a couple of years ago,so Liz and I can jet off to the sun whenever to escape the worst of Scotlands weather.We are off shortly to Spain this May/June,granddaughter Alba and parents are coming out with us for a week (Alba means Scotland in Gaelic) Alba is just a lovely person (16months old) the other grandkids are Parker 4 years old and my grandkid Orion 2 and a bit.Yes strange names,seems Scottish parents dont go in for John or Mary anymore.I do hope you forgive my rambling I just wanted to share with you there is life post cancer,I celebrate my 70th birthday this May and have much in life to look forward to.I do wish you a complete recovery from your surgery and can enjoy many years ahead.
  18. Like
    Curt reacted to Staceyj in Husband newly diagnosed - looking for support   
    Curt - thank you so very much! Your words give us both hope ❤️ I am thankful to hear that you are able to run and play with your kids! I am so happy for you that you did not have to go through radiation and chemo. We will keep both you and Lexie in our prayers for continued clean scans and good health. Scary stuff for sure - I am glad I was able to connect with you via this forum - it helps so very much. 
  19. Like
    Curt reacted to PaulaC in Time for Pet Scan   
    I’m doing the program C25K finishing week 5 and hope to start week 6. It’s an 8 week training program which is taking me about 12 weeks. 😂if I don’t master the week I redo it. I’m slow but moving. 🏃🏼‍♀️😂
  20. Like
    Curt reacted to LouT in My Introduction   
    Wow, you folks are great.  Hearing your experiences is so much better than just reading a brochure telling me what to expect.  I do get that everyone is different, but I must admit that my anxiety level has definitely gone down a bit since reading your experiences and hearing so many hopeful and positive things.  I'm also struck by the strength and courage I hear in your stories.  I couldn't be happier that I found this forum and I hope one day to pay it forward.

    LouT
  21. Like
    Curt reacted to BridgetO in Husband newly diagnosed - looking for support   
    Hi Stacey and welcome. I had my right lower lobe removed by VATS a couple of years ago when I was 71. I'm not debilitated: far from it. I can walk a couple of miles with no problem. This winter i've been working part time in an emergency shelter for homeless families, which is a pretty active job. I can reassure your husband that the vast majority of people who have lobectomies come out just about as fit as they went in, after a reasonable recovery period. My surgeon said that unless i was planning to run a marathon (which I wasn't! )I probably wouldn't notice a difference in my lung capacity, and that's been true.
    Bridget O
     
  22. Like
    Curt got a reaction from LouT in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
  23. Like
    Curt got a reaction from Staceyj in Husband newly diagnosed - looking for support   
    Hi Stacey.  Welcome.  I’m glad you found us but sorry you had to.  I am 43 years old, never smoker and had a right upper lobe lobectomy via VATS a little over six weeks ago.  I had the same images of being frail and walking around on oxygen as your husband has.  I don’t have any residual breathing issues.  I’m able to run, play in the yard with my kids and be active.  I do get out of breath quicker than I use to but I’m motivated to get back to 110%.  I had Stage 1 NSCLC Adenocarcinoma.  I don’t require any follow up treatment, just periodic CT scans for monitoring.  
     
     
     
  24. Like
    Curt reacted to LexieCat in My Introduction   
    I needed the narcotic pain meds only for the first day or two after I got home.  They make me nauseous, so I always work to get off them as soon as I can.  High-dose ibuprofen did the job just fine after that.  I did have some constipation, which happens after almost any kind of surgery, especially with the heavy-duty pain meds.  I drank a lot of high-fiber mix and it didn't last too long.  
    I didn't have extreme tiredness.  Nor was the pain especially bothersome after the first couple of weeks--I'd describe it more as soreness, like a pulled muscle.  Everyone is different--as Curt said, prepare for the worst, but hope for the best.  My bet is it will be a lot less daunting than you think it will.  
  25. Like
    Curt got a reaction from BridgetO in My Introduction   
    I had my surgery at 4 pm on a Tuesday.  I was up and walking slowly around the hospital wing the next morning.  They had me doing a mile of walking a day.  I went home on Thursday.  Going home will depend on when they can take your chest tube out.  I’ve heard of some people who went home with it in, I had to have it out before they would let me go home.  Walking and doing the breathing exercises speeds that up.   I continued walking in my house every day and doing breathing exercises.  I was told I could drive as soon as I stopped taking the pain meds.  I really needed the pain meds while I was in the hospital.  They helped with the pain but I felt like I was in the clouds and was also concerned about constipation.  I stopped taking oxy on the Saturday after surgery.  I switched to alternating Excedrin and Tylenol.  One side affect of the Tylenol and Excedrin was night sweats.  I would wake up drenched every morning.  I started to only take it as needed and tried to avoid it before bed.  They gave me nerve blocking medicine, Gabapentin, that was supposed to help with the nerve pain.  It looked like the northern lights in my head when I’d close my eyes.  My head also felt like I had a concussion.  I stopped taking that one on the Sunday after surgery.  The nerve pain bothered me, but I found the side affects of the meds worse.  They gave me  stool softeners. Between those, drinking a lot of water and moving around as much as possible I returned to normal bowel function in about a week.  I drove myself to get s haircut the Wednesday the following week after surgery and went into the office for a couple of hours on that Friday.  I was tired after doing almost anything.  I’d wake up, walk, take a shower, Eat breakfast then take a nap.  In the afternoon I’d wake up from my nap, walk, eat lunch, go do something like get a hair cut then take a nap.  It was a tired like I’ve never felt before. The kind of tired where I could fall asleep standing up.  The tired lasted three to four weeks.  The incisions under my arm hurt and had quite a bit of swelling.  I was not able to let my arm rest at my side for almost four weeks.  I carried a small pillow agains my hip and in my hand to keep the weight of my arm off my incision.  I was six weeks out this last Tuesday.  I still have some nerve discomfort, not pain.  I’m  told that could last a long time.  Internally I never experienced much pain with normal breathing.  I was really surprised by that.  It would only hurt if I coughed or sneezed   Sneezing was worse for me.  That small pillow I used under my arm doubled as something to squeeze when I had to cough or sneeze.  At this point I can do both without any pain.  There is a pulling sensation, but no pain.    
    The fact that you exercise a lot will be very helpful with your recovery and ability to regain your lung capacity.  I’m 43 and in average physical health.  I’d call myself dad fit.  I have three young sons and they keep me going.  I was able to max out the spirometer before surgery, 4000ml of lung capacity   I’m back to 3250ml.  I’m laser focused on getting all the way back.  I’m able to do light exercise with no issue.  I walk at a fast pace on the treadmill for a mile and a half.  I play in the yard with the kids and coach their baseball teams.  I do get winded if I elevate my activity to medium/high.  It is harder right now to catch my breath but I expect that to go away soon.  
    I went into my surgery not knowing if I had cancer and if it was going to be a wedge resection (what your are having) or a full lobectomy (what you will have if it is cancer).  I would figure after two weeks I was 60% recovered, four weeks 80% and after six weeks I’m 95%.  Lexi gave some great advice about planning ahead.  Hope for the best results but plan for the worst.  If you aren’t able to drive yourself you may be able to take an Uber with your wife.  Meal prep now so you have a lot of meals ready.  Order in.  Get your bed set up.  Have a chair set up you can sit in when you are tired.  Pay all your bills for May before hand and put yourself in the best position to have time to heal.  
    I completely understand not wanting to concede it’s cancer.  You should hold out hope it’s not.  I came to this site six months before knowing what it was.  It was the only place I could find answers.  If it is benign everyone here will be thrilled for you, if it is cancer everyone here will support you.  It sounds like you are in good health and will breeze through this.  Hopefully it’s just a biopsy.  
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