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Eileen

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I have now been smoke free two months

this has been something I have had such a struggle with and quit for about a year after my diagnosis

and I was so ashamed of myself when i went back

people thought I was nuts saying you are so lucky how can you do this to yourself?

I simply have no answer---guess i am weak

I hope this quit takes, I really do!

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you may have a addictive personality... so if you did not REPLACE your addicition with something else the urge/need to return to smoking is there.

try to think of something you can do with your hands to replace the urge/need crocheting...painting...playing with playdough... anything that might make you smile after doing it for 15 mins or so...

just an idea...its worked for other ppl I know

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Kicking the smoking habit is hard. I've smoked on and off since I was 19 (48 now), with the longest quit being 8 years. At times of high stress, a lot of people fall back on the stinky butts as a crutch. I've been smoke-free (for good this time) 2 weeks. Good luck to you and hang in there. Don't beat yourself for having difficulty quitting, they are more addictive than heroin. (google the stats). Ask your doctor if you can take Chantix - a new pill to help people stop. Works like a charm.

Susan

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Congratulations , Eileen. Quitting smoking is hard because nicotine is addictive. I quit over 4 years ago after smoking for 38 years. I learned so much about nicotine addiction from this site... http://whyquit.com/. You should be very proud of yourself for being two months free. I promise you that in time it does get easier. You will have triggers that make you have thoughts of smoking , but they are only thoughts. You are doing great.

Sue

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As long as you keep trying your NEVER WEAK! I hope this time it sticks for you. But if not, then you'll just have to try and try again, until it does. :wink: I know how hard it is to quit. I've been smoke free for 12 years now. :D Ever since they took my left lung out! :roll::wink:

Good luck to you. I won't shame you, but I will send you a (((((HUG)))).

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Eileen,

Congrats on the quit!!

You are past the physical addiction part, its' easier to handle the mental part without the physical craving. Just keep thinking it through.

And hey, you are one of the strongest people I know.

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Congratulations!! You're not weak, you're human. Don't be so hard on yourself. One day at a time. It's tough, but making the decision to quit is the first step towards success.

I've been smoke-free for 3 years and it's one of my proudest accomplishments. I know how hard it is to become a non-smoker, but you can do it!

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I used to smoke, right up until the moment before I entered the emergency room (11/8/06) and they knocked me out and intubated me for three weeks...

I still WANT to smoke. Everyday. Like right now.

The physical addiction came and went while I was unconscious, doesn's seem fair to the rest of you who quit the old fashioned way, I'm sure!

I like the idea of not smoking one day at a time, but that's just too many decision points for me, too many ways to say "just one" (where one is too many and a thousand is never enough)!

I can still taste it, I can still feel it, and I still like it (I know, sick isn't it?)

So here's my deal with myself. I smoked for nearly 35 years. If, after another 35 years (I'll be 86!), I STILL want to smoke, then I can have one, because by then, it probably won't matter much. And if I get to 86, I probably won't remember that I promised myself a cigarette!

So far, it' working for me, but I gotta quit thinking about it so much!

GinnyB

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Eileen,

Congratulations!! I know how hard it is. I have been smoke free now for 13 months. The urge will continue to come and go but after the first month it is easier to resist. When you feel the urge, find something to do to occupy your time. It will go away. For most people it takes more than one attempt to quit, so don't beat yourself up.

Lilly

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Eileen,

That's great. I quit servile times the last time was 35 years ago. Here is something that may help. Every time you see a person smoking or smell smoke, think bout getting sick to your stomach. When you think about cigarettes, think about how lousy they taste when you are sick or have a bad cold. When you light one up put it out and light another. I got to the point where now when I smell smoke I will get nauseas. It worked for me and made me not even to desire one.

Stay positive, :)

Ernie

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