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bluemax14

Up in the air and nervous

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Hello;

I have been going thru all kinds of test for 3 weeks now. The diagnosis is lung cancer (squamous) upper lobe left lung. The surgeon had scheduled me for surgery for today, But last week I had a lung scan and when the surgeon saw the results he canceled the surgery. He wants to do a surgical biopsy now. I'm waiting for a phone call to see if his office has set it up.

I have an appointment with my family doctor for this afternoon. I want him to give me a referal for a second opinion.

I am wondering why no one has suggested any treatment for me other than surgery. If I am to recieve treatment I want to start it as soon as possible.

I have had x-rays, cat scans, pet scans, a broncoscoyy with biopsy and a lung scan. Every test I take seems to turn out for the worse.

My best hope was for surgical removal of the tumor, but now I'm wondering if it is hopeless.

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The start of the battle is always the scariest and darn scary at that. But it will get better with time as you learn more and actually start your treatments.

It is NEVER hopeless...DO NOT ever give up. We are here to answer your questions and give you support. Use us!!!

jim

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Welcome. Just want you to know sometimes it is best to start with chemo and /or radiation. I did and I am soon to celebrate 8 yrs of survival and no signs of cancer.

by the way you said they had called it squamous cell lung cancer, didn't they do a biopsy, why or what is the surgeon wanting to biopsy?

Donna G

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Hi,

I remember when my Mom was first dx, it seemed like it took forever to get things going. They really didn't tell us too much as first, only the info we needed for the next step and nothing beyond that. Hang in there! It's never hopeless!

I will keep you in my prayers.

Patty

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Welcome. I am sure once all the tests are in they will have a treatment plan for you. Many times they start with chemo and radiation to shrink the tumor prior to surgery. Once you have the tests in a second opinion is not a bad idea. Good luck--hang in there.

Rochelle

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Thank you all for repling to my post. Here is a short history of my test.

Oct 3rd chest x-ray

Oct 5th cat scan of chest

Oct 12 breathing test at pulmonologist office

Oct 13 Broncoscopy and biopsy

Oct 17 PET scan-

Oct 19 consultation and exam thorasic surgeon

Oct 21st lung scan (nuclear)

Oct 24th chewing fingernails

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it's never hopeless, and second opinions are, I believe, a good thing. either you gain more confidence in your own doc or get new information that is useful in deciding on a treatment plan.

either waym, glad you found us.

hang in there,

xoxo

amie

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Hi Bluemax.

This is really an important time in your survival. You will be choosing a treatment plan that is best suited for you. If you are like me, I hadn't a clue about the ins and outs of lung cancer even though I had lost two young brothers to the dastardly illness.

I will encourage you to make the effort of getting all of your reports. Go through them with a fine tooth comb and understand every word that is in them. As you go down this path, you will uncover more and more knowledge about what it is you are dealing with. Use your computer. Believe much of what your computer has to say, but don't believe all of it.

There are many different approaches to treatment depending on your brand of cancer, location and extent of disease.

We will help you the best we can. This is a very active board whose members are here to help you sort things out. Give us more information. And remember we also have some very good experts here on the forum. They are wise and kind and also here to help.

Good luck and be back!

Cindi o'h

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Hang in there Kid, we have all been in your shoes (doesn't come easy to anyone of us). Most everyone I know has waited up to a month for exact mode of treatment. I did.

You have come to a wonderful place where all of us can give you a helping hand.

You will survive, just remember that!

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Glad you posted here, and welcome. Surgery is the treatment of choice when the doctors thinks there is a good chance to remove all the cancer. The doctor must have been something in the scan that told him it had spread, and surgery would then not be used. You need to write down your questions to the doctor ahead of time and be sure he answers them to your satisfaction, like "what did you see that changed your mind about surgery?"

There is plenty of hope. Just look around you on this website. I imagine the doctor will recommend chemo and even radiation for treatment. Hang in there, and let us know how you are doing. Don

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Wanted to welcome you and let you know that there is always hope...always!

Everyone has given you wonderful, useful advice, especially about finding out every thing you can, writing down your questions and coming *here* for support and info.

Adding you to my prayers and please hang in there!

Libby

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Hi , I just wanted to welcome you and let you know that you have found a wonderful group of people here. Everyone is willing and eager to help if they can. The more information you can share with us, the more we are able to help. Every case of cancer is unique as is every person who has it, but there are also a lot of similarities . Looking forward to knowing you better. Keep us up to date and know that we are glad to help in any way we can.

Sue

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I would be pushing for the Second Opinion consult with a major NIH-NCI designated comprehensive cancer center asap. Obtain copies of all of your scans and the reports, along with the PFTs and previous biopsy reports to take with you. I agree with Donna! You need to consult with a Medical Oncologist, too, about pretreating with chemo.

I know this can be overwhelming, but you only get one chance at first line treatment. You want to make certain that you get the best treatment.

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Welcome... glad you found us. As you can see, you will get great advice here, and it is NEVER hopeless. Just read some of the "My Stories". The first few weeks are always the hardest.. Hang in there.

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Hi Blue,

I just want to welcome you here. We are always here to answer your questions and for support when you need it.

One thing I want to bring out is LC is not a death sentence. They have come a long way in research and treatments. There are so many people on here who had grim diagnosis in the beginning who have beaten the odds and are still here running strong after many years since diagnosis.

A second opinion is always good to do. If you turn out to be a candidate for an operation, they you are very lucky.

Keep us posted and know we are here 24/7

Good luck,

Maryanne

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You've had a rough time of it this month, haven't you? I'm so sory. Wish no one ever had to go through this experience. Glad you're here --- the information, advice, concern, and humor here have made a tremendous difference to me.

The first month or two after diagnosis are so hard - every day feels like a visit to the Twilight Zone. And the rushes of fear that come washing over you out of the blue are the worst. Fear, confusion, disorientation, and a sense of unbearable urgency are common side effects of a lung cancer diagnosis. Fortunately, they will subside a little every day.Once you have a good medical team you trust and make a plan of action, things will start to ease up. Really.

Learn everything you can about your conidition and treatment options. Skip the statistics about survival" - they are scary for everyone and not particularly useful. Your doctors are there to serve you - bring notes, questions you've prepared in advance and make the most of your visits. Ask questions until you feel you really understand what the doctor says. There are no "stupid" questions.

Who is around to support you emotionally, to listen, to be strong when you don't feel strong? Fighting this disease is a team effort -- accept all the support and help you can get. We're always here for you at LCSC.

You're not alone, friend.

Leslie

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Again I would like to say thank you to all the wonderful people who replied to my post.

Today I am recovering from yesterdays biopsy (what they call the Chamberlain procedure). Also getting over my mad at the surgeon for leaving me in the little curtained off area the hospital uses for rooms for almost 7 hours and no post recovery directions or prescription. I drank so much black coffee waiting for him to show up I was a nervous wreck. I finlly gave up waiting for him and had my family take me home.

The surgeon did talk to my wife and her sister and brother in law. The news was not good. he said the lymph nodes were cancerous. My wife didn't give me the news till late in the evening.

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blue,

sorry you need us, but glad you found us. My husbad is the one with lung cancer so I am speaking as a famliy member/caregiver. Please keep hope and faith the 1st month of Alan's DX was probably the most stressful. The appointments, uncertainty, ect. However, you will fall back into some type of routine eventually. Sorry you had such a terrible experience with your surgeon, that is NOT acceptable and a new Dr. may be in order.

I will pray for you and your family.

Debbie

Husband Alan DX small cell lung cancer Jan 10th 2005

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Hi again Bluemax..

I tried looking up Chamberlain procedure and wasn't able to come up with anything. I had a mediastinoscopy where a little slit above my colarbone gave access to a scope and snips throughout my medastinum to get at the lymph nodes. Mine were affected by cancer also. Like you, I was hoping that the cancer had not spread, but it had.

It spread to the opposing side of the tumored lung, so that put me at stage lllb.

That was almost 3 years ago. I had lots of radiation and chemo and I am still perking along. So far, it looks as if all of the cancer was destroyed.

Now, you will need to focus on the next step. You will need to learn the exact extent of the disease and choose a treatment plan that will probably include radiation and chemotherapy. There are many options available. You will probably be talking to a radiation oncologist and a medical oncologist.

Where do you live? What part of the country or world?

Don't forget to spit out those fingernails! And you know, many of us got help from an anti-anxiety med in our first weeks from diagnosis.

We're still here. Glad you are too!

Cindi o'h

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The Chamberlain procedure is just a differant name for the same procedure you had, which I can't even spell. The doctor hasn't mentioned anything about stages, but he is going to set up an appointment with an oncologist for me early next week.

Your post was encoraging, thank you.

I live in Northeat Arkansas, about 70 miles from Memphis.

I have to confess that my fingernails are safe, but I have been having a few highballs and lowballs. Not enough to get real high, but I have gotten quite mellow a time or two in the last 2 weeks.

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Hey Bluemax..whatever gets you through the night...

My Dad lived in Dumas, AR. many years and worked as an aerial crop duster and operations manager for cotton, rice, and beans.

I am guessing, then, that you will be going to Memphis for all of your medical care and treatments?

There are some really good links to information and encouragement from many of our members here. Look up Leslie's links. She has a very positive outlook on her cancer and life and has put much effort into her own recovery along these lines while helping others to find their way through the initial shock stages.

I remember one thing about myself that has pretty much stuck with me this whole time. And that was that I was unique and an individual. And that my experience with my lc was my own. And that just because someone else didn't survive it, didn't necessarily mean that I couldn't survive it. I can! And you can too!

It takes commitment and effort on your part! Try to muster your inner courage to fight back. Use all of the survivor skills that you have learned throughout your life. You can do this!

Have you been reading messages from members on this board? Have you been reading "my story"? There is alot to learn. Have you gone to read the "ask the expert"? Lots to do...!

We are here!

Cindi o'h

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